Most Common Birds in Ohio

Did you know that Ohio is home to more than 350 different species of birds? In this blog post, we will take a look at some of the most common birds in our state. These birds can be found in many different habitats, including forests, wetlands, and urban areas. Keep reading for a closer look at these fascinating creatures!

Common Backyard Birds of Ohio:

House Sparrow

House Sparrows are small birds with stout bodies and short necks. They have brown upperparts, pale underparts, and a gray breast. The males have black throats and darker crowns. Females usually have lighter throats and crowns. House Sparrows are seedeaters, but they will also eat insects.

They forage on the ground in open areas. House Sparrows are found in urban and agricultural areas. They nest in cavities, either natural or man-made. House Sparrows are social birds and often form flocks.

The House Sparrow is a small bird that can be found in both urban and agricultural areas. It has a stout body and a short neck, with brown upperparts and pale underparts. The male House Sparrow has a black throat and a darker crown, while the female usually has a lighter throat and crown.

Tufted Titmouse

Tufted Titmouse is a small songbird with gray upperparts, white underparts, and a black cap. This bird has a long crest on its head that often stands erect. The Tufted Titmouse is found in woodlands and gardens where it feeds on insects, spiders, berries, and nuts. These birds are social creatures and often travel in small flocks. The Tufted Titmouse is a small songbird measuring about five to six inches in length.

This bird has gray upperparts, white underparts, and a black cap. The most distinguishing feature of the Tufted Titmouse is the long crest on its head that often stands erect. The Tufted Titmouse is found in woodlands and gardens where it feeds on insects, spiders, berries, and nuts.

These birds are social creatures and often travel in small flocks. The Tufted Titmouse is a non-migratory bird found throughout the year in Ohio. This bird can be seen all year round in woodlands, gardens, and even urban areas.

American Goldfinch

The American goldfinch, also known as the Eastern goldfinch or simply the wild canary, is a small North American bird in the finch family. It is migratory, ranging from mid-Alberta to North Carolina during the breeding season, and from just south of the Canadian border to Florida during the winter. Male and female goldfinches are very similar in appearance, with only slight differences in size and coloration.

Both sexes have a black cap and wings, a bright yellow body, and a white underside. The tail is usually black with white markings on the tips of the outer feathers. Goldfinches are relatively small birds, measuring just over four inches in length and weighing less than one ounce.

Goldfinches are seed eaters and are particularly fond of thistle seeds. They will also feed on other small seeds, such as those from dandelions, cosmos, and sunflowers. In the winter months, when seeds are scarce, they will switch to a diet of insects. Goldfinches are found in open woodlands, fields, and gardens.

They build their nests in trees or shrubs, using plant down, spider webs, and other soft materials to construct a cup-shaped structure. Goldfinches typically lay four to six eggs at a time.

Carolina Wren

The Carolina wren is a small songbird with a long tail and rusty-brown plumage. It has a white belly and black streaks on its back. The Carolina wren is found in the eastern United States, from Maine to Florida and west to Texas. It prefers wooded habitats near streams or swamps. The Carolina wren is a ground nester and builds its nest in tree cavities, logs, or stumps.

It is a timid bird and is easily frightened by loud noises. The Carolina wren feeds on insects, spiders, and snails. It also eats fruits and berries. The Carolina wren is a common backyard bird in the eastern United States.

Song Sparrow

Song Sparrows are one of the most widespread birds in North America. They’re small sparrows with streaked brown upperparts and a plain gray breast with a central dark spot. The head has a distinctively shaped blackish mark behind each eye, and there are two whitish wingbars. Their bill is pinkish with a dark tip, and their legs and feet are brown. Females are similar to males, but they’re usually a little bit smaller.

Song Sparrows eat mostly insects and seeds. In the spring and summer, they eat mostly insects, including beetles, caterpillars, grasshoppers, crickets, and spiders. In the fall and winter, they switch to eating mostly seeds, including the seeds of grasses, sedges, and forbs. They also eat some fruits and berries, especially in the fall.

Northern Cardinals

Cardinals are small songbirds with bright red plumage. The males are especially vibrant, with a red crest and black mask. Cardinals are year-round residents in Ohio and can be found in woodlands, gardens, and backyards. They eat a diet of insects and seeds and build nests in trees or bushes.

Cardinals are social birds and often travel in pairs or small flocks. They are known for their melodious songs, which they sing year-round. Cardinals are a beloved bird species in Ohio and across the United States.

Common Grackle

The Common Grackle is a member of the blackbird family and is native to North America. These birds are easily identified by their iridescent black feathers and long tail. The male Common Grackle is larger than the female and can reach up to 15 inches in length.

The diet of the Common Grackle consists mainly of insects, but they will also eat fruits and seeds. These birds are often seen foraging in fields and meadows.

The Common Grackle is a social bird and can often be seen in large flocks. During the breeding season, these birds form small pairs or family groups. The female will build the nest using twigs, grass, and other materials. The nest is usually located in a tree or shrub.

White-breasted Nuthatch

(Sitta carolinensis)

The White-breasted Nuthatch is a small songbird with a black cap and white face. It has a blue-gray back, wings, and tail. The belly and breast are white. Males and females look alike. These birds are about five inches long and weigh about an ounce.

White-breasted Nuthatches eat mostly insects and nuts. They use their strong beaks to crack open acorns and other hard seeds. You can often see these birds climbing up and down tree trunks headfirst!

These birds live in woods with mature trees. They nest in holes in tree trunks or walls. White-breasted Nuthatches are found throughout the eastern United States.

If you see a White-breasted Nuthatch, listen for its loud, nasal call: “yank yank yank!” You might also hear these birds making a high, twittering sound. These noises help them keep track of other nuthatches in their territory. These birds are fun to watch as they hop around on tree trunks and branches, often hanging upside down!

American Crowd

American crows are large birds, measuring about 40cm in length. They have black feathers and can be found in open woodlands, fields, and near water. American crows are Omnivorous and eat a variety of food including insects, small mammals, berries, and carrion.

These birds are known to be intelligent and are often seen working together to solve problems. American crows are also known to be aggressive and will defend their territory from other birds and animals.

Red-winged Blackbird

The Red-winged Blackbird is a medium-sized blackbird with striking red and yellow shoulder patches on its wings. Both sexes have these markings, but they are more pronounced in males. The female is dark brown overall with some pale streaks on her body and wings. These birds are found in open habitats such as marshes, ponds, and meadows throughout North America.

Their diet consists mainly of insects, but they will also eat berries and seeds. In the summer, you may see them chasing after dragonflies or catching grasshoppers in mid-air. Red-winged Blackbirds are known for their loud, musical songs which they sing from high perches such as tree branches or power lines.

Males are very territorial and will defend their breeding territory from other males by singing, displaying their wings, and even dive-bombing intruders. If you hear a loud “konk-la-ree” coming from a nearby marsh, chances are there’s a Red-winged Blackbird nearby!

House Finch

The house finch is a small songbird with a short tail and pointed bill. The adult male has red on its head, breast, and back, with brown streaks on its sides. Females and young birds are gray-brown with streaked breasts. These birds are found in open areas such as fields, suburbs, and parks.

They eat seeds, grains, and insects. House finches build nests of twigs and leaves in trees or shrubs. They are often seen perching on power lines or fence posts. These birds are not afraid of humans and will often approach people for food.

Blue Jay

Blue Jays are one of the most common birds in North America. They are easily identified by their blue plumage and crest on their head. Blue Jays are also known for their loud calls which can often be heard in suburban areas.

The diet of a Blue Jay consists mainly of acorns, nuts, and seeds. In the spring and summer months, they will also eat insects. Blue Jays typically nest in trees and lay between two and six eggs.

Blue Jays are medium-sized birds, measuring about 12 inches in length. They have a wingspan of around 16 inches.

The habitat of a Blue Jay is typically woods or forested areas near open spaces. They are also commonly found in suburban areas.

The behavior of a Blue Jay can vary depending on the time of year. During the breeding season, they are known to be aggressive towards other birds and animals. Outside of the breeding season, they typically form small flocks and forage for food together. Blue Jays will also often mimic the calls of other birds.

Mourning Doves

Mourning Doves are the most common bird in North America, and you’re likely to hear their mournful cooing in Ohio. The grayish-brown birds have a long, pointed tail and are about 13 inches long. They eat mostly seeds, and you’ll often see them perched on power lines or fences.

Mourning Doves mate for life and build their nests in trees or on ledges. The female usually lays two eggs, which hatch after about two weeks. The young birds leave the nest after about another two weeks. You might see Mourning Doves year-round in Ohio, but they’re most common in spring and summer.

Downy Woodpecker

The Downy Woodpecker is the smallest woodpecker in North America. They are mostly black with a white belly and wings, and have a small red patch on their head. These birds are found in woods across North America and prefer to nest in trees.

Downy Woodpeckers eat insects, which they find by pecking holes in tree bark. These birds are about six inches long and weigh around two ounces.

The Downy Woodpecker is the smallest woodpecker in North America, measuring in at about six inches long and weighing around two ounces. As their name suggests, these birds are downy, or soft to the touch, due to their feathers.

Downy Woodpeckers are mostly black with a white belly and wings, and have a small red patch on their head.

Carolina Chickadee

The Carolina chickadee is a small songbird with a black cap and bib, gray back, wings, and tail, and white sides and belly. It has a large head with a short bill. Males and females look alike. Juveniles have duller plumage. These birds are found in woodlands across the eastern United States.

The Carolina chickadee’s diet consists of insects, spiders, and other small invertebrates. They will also eat seeds and berries. These birds forage in trees and shrubs, often flying out from a perch to catch an insect in midair. They will also pick food items from the surface of leaves or branches.

Carolina chickadees are small birds, measuring only four to five inches in length. They have a wingspan of six to seven inches. These birds weigh only about half an ounce.

Northern Flicker

The Northern Flicker is a member of the woodpecker family. They are native to North America and can be found in woods, fields, and backyards. These birds are easily identified by their brown bodies with black bars, white underparts, and a red patch on their heads. Male flickers also have a black mustache mark.

Flickers are mostly ground feeders and eat a variety of insects, berries, and seeds. They will also visit bird feeders for nuts and suet. These birds are about 15 inches in length with a wingspan of 24-26 inches.

Northern Flickers typically nest in tree cavities but will also use man-made nest boxes. Both parents help to incubate the eggs and care for the young. These birds are generally solitary, but can sometimes be seen in small flocks. During the winter months, they may roost communally in large groups.

Flickers are active during the day and are often heard before they are seen. Their loud calls of “wick-a-wick-a-wick” or “kee-yer” are a common sound in many backyards.

European Starlings

European Starlings are small, stocky birds with short legs. They have black feathers with iridescent green, blue, and purple highlights. The adult male has a white spot on each side of its head. European Starlings are about the same size as an American Robin.

Their diet consists of insects, fruits, and seeds. In the spring and summer, they eat mostly insects. In the fall and winter, they eat more fruits and seeds.

European Starlings live in open habitats with trees nearby. They are found in woods, fields, gardens, and parks.

European Starlings are social birds. They often form large flocks. During the breeding season, they build nests in trees. They lay three to seven eggs per clutch.

Red-bellied Woodpecker

The Red-bellied Woodpecker is a common bird found in Ohio. It is easily identified by its red belly, black and white stripes on its back, and black cap. This woodpecker is a medium-sized bird, measuring about nine inches in length.

Its diet consists mainly of insects, which it finds by pecking at tree bark. The Red-bellied Woodpecker prefers to live in forests, but can also be found in suburban areas.

It is a very active bird, often seen flying from tree to tree or hanging upside down while feeding. This woodpecker is also known for its loud call, which sounds like a rapid drumming noise.

American Robin

(Turdus migratorius)

The American Robin is a songbird of the true thrush genus and Turdidae, the wider thrush family. It is named after the European robin because of its reddish-orange breast, though the two species are not closely related, with the European robin belonging to the Old World flycatcher family. The American Robin is widely distributed throughout North America, wintering farther south than the closely related Gray-cheeked Thrush and Bicknell’s Thrush.

The adult robin is preyed upon by hawks, cats, and snakes. Its eggs and nestlings are also eaten by a wide variety of animals, from squirrels to blue jays to crows. Despite this, the American Robin is one of the most abundant thrushes in North America, with a population of more than 300 million.

Eastern Bluebird

The eastern bluebird is a small thrush with brilliant blue feathers on its back and head, rusty-brown wings and tail, and white underparts. Males and females look similar. These birds are about six to seven inches long with a wingspan of nine to 11 inches.

Their diet consists of insects such as grasshoppers, crickets, and beetles. They also eat berries and fruits.

The eastern bluebird is found in open woodlands, farmlands, and suburbs. In winter, they sometimes come to backyards and bird feeders. These birds build their nests in tree cavities or nest boxes. The female lays three to seven eggs per clutch.

The eastern bluebird is the state bird of Missouri and New York. These birds are not currently considered endangered, but their populations have declined in recent years due to loss of habitat.

Chickadees

Chickadees are small songbirds with black cap and bib, white cheeks, grey back, wings and tail.

Females have a brownish cap. Chickadees are found in woodlands and forests across North America. These birds are constantly busy searching for food which consists of insects, spiders, seeds and nuts. They will often hang upside down while looking for food.

Chickadees are very curious and will often approach people. They will even land on your head or shoulder! These birds are extremely important to our ecosystem because they help control the insect population.

The best time to see a chickadee is during the winter months when they are looking for food to store away for the cold winter months. Chickadees are very important to our ecosystem and it is always a pleasure to see one!

Pine Warbler – Setophaga pinus

The Pine Warbler is a small songbird with a stout body and short tail. It has a yellowish-olive upper body, whitish underparts, and a dark-streaked back. The male has a yellow head with a black cap and line through the eye. Females and young birds are paler overall with less distinct head markings.

Pine Warblers breed in coniferous forests across the eastern United States and Canada. They nest in a tree cavity or nest box and lay four to six eggs. These warblers are insectivores and eat mostly caterpillars. They forage for food by climbing through foliage and picking insects off of needles and leaves. Pine Warblers are non-migratory and spend the winter in their breeding range.

Some birds may move to lower elevations in the mountains during cold weather. Pine Warblers are shy birds that stay high in trees, making them difficult to spot. They are most easily heard during the spring when they sing a clear, warbling song from the top of a tree.

Chipping Sparrow – Spizella passerine

The Chipping Sparrow is a small sparrow with a pale brown back, gray breast, and white belly. They have a dark brown cap and a black line through their eyes. Their bill is short and pointed. Chipping Sparrows are about five inches long.

These sparrows eat mostly insects but will also eat seeds. In the summer, they will eat grasshoppers, beetles, and caterpillars. In the winter, they eat mostly seeds from weeds and trees.

Chipping Sparrows live in open areas with some trees. They are commonly found in parks and yards. They make small nests out of twigs and grasses. Chipping Sparrows are not aggressive and will often live in close proximity to humans.

During the spring and summer, Chipping Sparrows can be heard singing a simple song made up of three or four notes. This sparrow gets its name from its call, which sounds like “chip-chip-chip”. The Chipping Sparrow is a common bird across North America.

Killdeer – Charadrius vociferus

The killdeer is a plover, a group of wading birds that also includes the sandpipers. It is about nine inches long with a wingspan of approximately 16 inches. The upperparts are mottled brown and white, while the underparts are primarily white with some black on the breast and sides. The face is white with a black stripe across the eye. The bill is short and black, and the legs are orange. The killdeer has a distinctive call that sounds like its name.

The killdeer is found in North America, Central America, and the Caribbean. It breeds in open areas with little vegetation, such as fields, golf courses, and beaches. The killdeer are migratory bird species, wintering in the southern United States, Mexico, and Central America.

The diet of the killdeer consists primarily of insects, such as beetles, grasshoppers, and crickets. It will also eat snails, earthworms, and other small invertebrates.

The killdeer is a ground-nesting bird. The female lays a clutch of four eggs in a scrape on the ground. Both parents incubate the eggs for about 28 days. The chicks are able to fly within three weeks of hatching.

Dark-eyed Junco – Junco hyemalis

The Dark-eyed Junco is a small sparrow with a slate-gray back and white belly. The head is gray with a black bill, eyes, and legs. They are about six inches long with a wingspan of eight to ten inches.

These birds breed in open woodlands in the summertime but can be found in a variety of habitats during the winter. In Ohio, they are most often seen in forests and fields but can also be found near bird feeders.

Dark-eyed Juncos eat mostly seeds and insects. During the summer, their diet consists mainly of insects. You can attract them to your yard by providing a bird feeder with seed mix, millet, and sunflower seeds.

White-throated Sparrow – Zonotrichia albicollis

The white-throated sparrow is a fairly small songbird with a stout body and a relatively long tail. The adult has gray-brown upperparts, white underparts, and a distinctive white throat with yellow streaks. The bill is pinkish-brown, the legs are pale pink, and the eyes are dark brown. The male and female are similar in appearance, but the male is usually slightly larger.

The white-throated sparrow is found in woodlands and brushy areas throughout most of North America. It typically nests on or near the ground, often using a fallen log or stump as a base. The diet of this bird consists mainly of insects and black oil sunflower seeds.

The white-throated sparrow is generally a shy and secretive bird, but it can become quite tame in some situations. It is known to sometimes build its nest in the eaves of houses or other man-made structures. This bird usually forms small flocks during the winter months.

Rufuos Hummingbird – Selasphorus rufus

The Rufous Hummingbird is a small hummingbird with striking red-orange plumage. It is one of the most widespread hummingbirds in North America, breeding from Alaska and western Ohio south to northern Mexico. This hummingbird is migratory, spending the winter in Mexico and Central America.

The Rufous Hummingbird is a sexually dimorphic species, meaning that males and females have different plumage. The male has brilliant red-orange feathers on its back, tail, and flanks.

The throat and chin are white, while the rest of the underparts are pale gray. The female Rufous Hummingbird is much paler, with greenish-gray upperparts and white underparts. Both sexes have a rufous (reddish-brown) wash on their sides and flanks.

Brown-headed Nuthatch – Sitta pusilla

The Brown-headed Nuthatch is a small songbird with a large head, short tail, and stout bill. They are grayish-brown above and pale below, with a black cap and white face. Males and females look alike. Brown-headed Nuthatches are found in forests of the southeastern United States.

These birds forage actively in trees, often hanging upside down, using their sharp bills to pry open bark to find insects. They will also eat nuts and black oil sunflower seeds. Brown-headed Nuthatches nest in cavities in trees, usually old woodpecker holes. They often use acorns or other small objects to prop open the entrance to their nest.

Brown-headed Nuthatches are social birds, often seen in pairs or small flocks. They are active and noisy, constantly calling to each other with a high-pitched “tsee-tsee-tsee” sound.

White-winged Crossbill – Loxia leucoptera

The white-winged crossbill is a small songbird with a large bill that is slightly crossed at the tips. The male has red plumage, while the female is usually greenish-brown. These birds are found in North America, mostly in coniferous forests. They feed on the seeds of pine cones and other cone-bearing trees.

White-winged crossbills are known for their unusual feeding behavior; they use their crossed bills to pry open pine cones and extract the seeds.

These birds are fairly small, measuring only about six inches in length. They have a wingspan of eight to ten inches. The white-winged crossbill is a fairly common bird in North America, and its population is thought to be stable.

What kinds of birds live in Ohio?

There are many different types of birds that live in Ohio. Some of the more common ones include robins, bluebirds, cardinals, and finches. There are also many different types of ducks and geese that live in Ohio. The state is home to many different kinds of birds.

What birds are most common in Ohio?

The most common birds in Ohio are American robins, northern cardinals, and mourning doves. These three species make up nearly 60% of the state’s bird population. Other common birds include blue jays, downy woodpeckers, and black-capped chickadees.

What are song birds in Ohio?

There are more than 400 species of songbirds in Ohio. The most common songbirds include the American robin, the northern cardinal, and the blue jay. Some of the less common songbirds include the yellow-breasted chat, the scarlet tanager, and the brown thrasher.

How many bird species are native to Ohio?

There are 211 species of birds that are native to Ohio. This number includes both migratory and non-migratory birds. Ohio is home to a variety of different bird habitats, including forests, wetlands, and grasslands. Some of the more common bird species that can be found in Ohio include the American crow, the blue jay, and the cardinal.

Ohio is also home to a number of rare bird species, such as the bald eagle and the peregrine falcon. Bird watching is a popular pastime in Ohio, and there are many different ways to get involved.

Bird Feeders

One of the best ways to attract birds to your yard is by putting up a bird feeder. Bird feeders come in a variety of shapes and sizes, and you can choose one that best fits the needs of the birds in your area. It’s important to keep your bird feeder clean, and to make sure that it is filled with the right type of food. Some common bird feeder foods include sunflower seeds, peanuts, and suet.