Most Common Birds in Oklahoma

Oklahoma, known as the Sooner State, is a diverse landscape of forests, mountains, and plains. This environment supports a variety of bird species, including waterfowl, raptors, and songbirds.

Join us as we explore the various birds in Oklahoma through pictures and key information. Rest assured that all data has been collected from credible sources and authenticated by an Ornithologist.

Common Backyard Birds of Oklahoma

Dark-eyed Junco

Dark-eyed Junco

Dark-eyed Junco is a small songbird commonly found in Oklahoma. It has a gray body with a white belly and dark stripes on its head and back. Its diet consists mainly of seeds and insects.

In terms of habitat, Dark-eyed Juncos can be found in open woodlands, parks, and backyard bird feeders. In the winter, they often form large flocks and can be seen foraging on the ground together.

These birds are known for their musical, repetitive songs and also have a distinct call that sounds like a tinkling bell. They typically breed in spring and build cup-shaped nests on the ground or low in bushes or trees.

Northern mockingbirds

Northern mockingbirds

Northern mockingbirds are small, gray birds with white patches on their wings and tails. They have a black masks on their face and are known for their vocal abilities, mimicking the sounds of other birds and even man-made noises.

In Oklahoma, they can be found in open areas such as parks, fields, and residential areas.

Their diet consists mainly of insects and fruits, which they forage for on the ground.

In terms of behavior, northern mockingbirds are fiercely territorial and will aggressively defend their territory by chasing off other birds and even mammals. They also mate for life and often build their nests in shrubs or trees.

Eastern Bluebird

Eastern Bluebird

(Sialia sialis) can be identified by their blue plumage on the top of their bodies and rust-colored breast. In Oklahoma, they can be found in open woodlands, fields, orchards, and backyard habitats. These birds primarily eat insects and berries. Adult Eastern Bluebirds have an average length of 6-7 inches and a wingspan of 10 inches.

In the breeding season, males will perform aerial displays to attract a mate and establish territory. Eastern Bluebirds will also use man-made nest boxes for nesting and raising young. These birds often form small flocks outside of the breeding season.

Eastern Bluebirds are considered a non-threatened species, though their numbers have decreased in the past due to competition from introduced species and loss of suitable habitat.

Conservation efforts such as providing nest boxes and managing open woodlands can help support populations of this beautiful bird.

Eastern Bluebird range map

Northern Cardinals

Northern Cardinals

Northern Cardinals, also known as redbirds, are easily identifiable by their bright red plumage and crested head. They primarily eat seeds and insects and can be found in wooded areas, gardens, and backyard bird feeders.

These birds are monogamous and territorial, often seen defending their territory with loud songs and aerial displays. On average, they measure approximately 9 inches in length and have a wingspan of 12 inches.

In Oklahoma, Northern Cardinals can be spotted year-round. However, their populations may fluctuate during the winter months as some migrate to southern regions.

Red-winged Blackbird

Red-winged Blackbird

Red-winged Blackbird can be identified by their glossy black feathers with distinct red and yellow shoulder patches. They primarily eat insects, seeds, and grains.

These birds range in size from 7-9 inches in length and can be found in wetlands, marshes, agricultural fields, and grasslands. Their behavior includes flying in large flocks and aggressive territorial defense during the breeding season.

In Oklahoma, they can be commonly seen nesting in cattail marshes and fields. They are also known for their loud and distinctive “konk-la-ree” call.

Carolina Chickadee

Carolina Chickadee

Carolina Chickadee, identified by its black and white coloring and distinct “chick-a-dee-dee-dee” call, primarily eats insects, seeds, and berries.

These small birds typically measure 4-5 inches in length and can be found in wooded habitats such as forests and parks. Carolina Chickadees are known for their intelligence and problem-solving abilities, and have been observed using tools to obtain food.

They also engage in cooperative breeding, with a group of chicks often being raised by multiple adult birds. In Oklahoma, the Carolina Chickadee can be seen year-round and is a common backyard visitor.

House Sparrow

House Sparrow

House Sparrows, also known as English Sparrows, can be identified by their small round bodies, brown and black streaked backs, white undersides, and distinct dark patches on either side of their cheeks.

They are omnivorous and mainly eat seeds, but will also feed on insects and even small rodents. These birds measure about 5 to 6 inches in length and have a wingspan of 7 to 8 inches.

In Oklahoma, House Sparrows can be found in urban areas such as cities and towns, where they nest in man-made structures like buildings and bridges. They are highly social birds, often seen foraging and nesting in large flocks.

While they may occasionally mimic the songs of other bird species, their own calls are described as chirps and trills.

House Sparrow range map

Common Grackle

Common Grackle

Common Grackle birds in Oklahoma can be identified by their iridescent black feathers and long tail. They are omnivorous, feeding on insects, seeds, grains, and berries. These birds typically measure around 12 inches in length and can be found in open areas such as fields, parks, and wetlands.

Grackles are known for their noisy vocalizations and large flocks. They have also been known to destroy crops and steal food from other birds.

Common Grackle range map

American Goldfinch

American Goldfinch

American Goldfinch, also known as the “Wild Canary,” is a small bird with bright yellow feathers, black wings, and a distinctive black cap on its head. Its diet consists primarily of seeds and insects.

In Oklahoma, American Goldfinches can be found in open woodlands and fields, often near thistle or sunflower plants. They are social birds, often seen in flocks and known for their playful behavior, including hanging upside down to eat.

Despite their small size, American Goldfinches are strong fliers and migrate long distances. They also have the ability to adjust the pitch of their songs, allowing them to communicate with other Goldfinches even among noisy surroundings.

American Goldfinch range map

American Robin

american robin

(Turdus migratorius)

The American Robin is a recognizable medium-sized bird with a red-orange breast, dark head and back, and white belly. They have a distinctive black bill and yellow eyes.

In the wild, their diet consists mostly of insects, worms, and fruit. In urban areas, they may also eat bread and birdseed from backyard bird feeders.

Adult robins typically measure about 10 inches in length and have a wingspan of 16 inches.

Their preferred habitat includes open woodlands, gardens, parks, and lawns.

In the springtime, robins are known for their loud singing. They also have a distinctive behavior of repeatedly hopping and then suddenly stopping to listen for prey on the ground.

In Oklahoma, American Robins can be found year-round but may form large flocks during migration. They are commonly seen in both rural and urban areas.

American Robin range map

Blue Jay

blue jay

Blue Jays are easily identifiable by their bright blue feathers and crest on top of their head. They have black markings on their wings and tail and a white chest.

In terms of diet, Blue Jays are omnivores and will eat both plants and small animals such as insects and eggs from other bird’s nests.

They are typically about 11-12 inches in size, with a wingspan of 13-17 inches.

Blue Jays can be found in various habitats including forests, gardens, and parks.

In terms of behavior, Blue Jays are known for their loud calls and aggressiveness towards other birds. They also have the ability to imitate the calls of hawks to scare off other birds and protect their territory. Blue Jays are also known for their clever problem-solving skills, such as using tools to obtain food.

In Oklahoma, Blue Jays can be seen year-round, but are more abundant during the winter months when they often gather in large flocks.

Brown-headed Cowbird

Brown-headed Cowbird

(Molothrus after) is a blackbird with a distinct chocolate-brown head and thick bill. These birds can often be found in open grasslands and agricultural fields, where they forage on insects and seeds.

They are known for their parasitic breeding behavior, laying their eggs in the nests of other bird species and leaving the host parents to raise their young. This adaptation allows them to spend less time on nest building and caring for their own offspring, and instead focus on finding more nests to parasitize.

In terms of size, the Brown-headed Cowbird is approximately 7-9 inches in length with a wingspan of 12-15 inches. They have a fairly high adaptability to human-altered habitats and can often be found in urban and suburban areas as well.

Mourning Doves

Mourning Doves

Mourning Doves are easily identified by their soft, gray-brown bodies and long, pointed tails. They have a small black spot on their neck and a bill that is dark at the tip and pinkish toward the face.

In Oklahoma, Mourning Doves primarily eat seeds from grasses and weeds. They will also eat grains found in agricultural fields.

Mourning Doves typically reach sizes of 11 to 13 inches in length and weigh around 4 ounces.

In Oklahoma, Mourning Doves can often be found in open fields and grasslands, as well as suburban areas with nearby sources of food.

These birds are ground foragers, but they will also perch on telephone wires and bird feeders. Mourning Doves are known for their cooing calls and courtship displays, in which they fly high with wings humming before descending in a spiral motion. They also perform a “mourning” display by bowing their heads and spreading their tails.

Mourning Doves form long-term pair bonds and often mate for life. They build their nests on horizontal surfaces, such as tree branches and ledges, using twigs and grasses to construct a flimsy platform.

Females typically lay two eggs at a time and both parents take turns incubating them for about 14 days until they hatch. The young fledge about 10 days after hatching and usually have one brood per year.

Mourning Doves are common and widespread throughout Oklahoma, with a stable population. They are not currently threatened or endangered. However, they can be hunted for sport during certain seasons in the state.

Conservation efforts focus on protecting their habitats and regulating hunting practices to ensure sustainable populations.

European Starlings

European Starling

European Starlings, also known as Common Starlings, can be identified by their iridescent black feathers with speckles of white. They have a long, pointed beak which they use to forage for food such as insects, grains, and fruit.

In Oklahoma, these birds can typically be found in open areas such as fields and parks. They also make their homes in urban areas, nesting in holes in buildings and trees.

In terms of behavior, European Starlings are highly social birds often seen in large flocks. They are known for their vocal abilities and for mimicking other bird sounds. Additionally, they have been observed using tools to obtain food.

On average, these birds measure around 8 inches in length and have a wingspan of 12-15 inches.

Barn Swallows

Barn Swallows

Barn Swallows are small, slender birds with dark blue upperparts and light-orange breasts with dark streaks. They have long, pointed wings and deeply forked tails. Their diet consists mainly of flying insects caught in the air.

In Oklahoma, Barn Swallows can be found near open habitats such as fields, pastures, and wetlands. They often build cup-shaped nests made of mud on man-made structures such as buildings, bridges, and barns.

In terms of behavior, Barn Swallows are highly social birds often seen in large flocks. They perform aerial acrobatics, catching insects on the wing with their wide mouths. They also have a distinct bouncing flight pattern as they search for food.

During the breeding season, Barn Swallows are known to aggressively defend their nests from potential predators and competitors.

Carolina Wren

Carolina Wren

Carolina Wrens can be identified by their reddish-brown plumage, white eyebrow stripe, and long black bill. They primarily feed on insects, but also eat berries and seeds.

These small birds typically grow to around 4 – 5 inches in length.

In Oklahoma, they can be found in forests, shrublands, and even urban areas with dense vegetation.

They are known for their loud and energetic songs, as well as their habit of vigorously wagging their tails up and down. Carolina Wrens often build dome-shaped nests in small, hidden areas such as crevices or hanging plants.

They have also been known to nest in birdhouses and even shoe boxes left out by humans. This species is non-migratory and typically stays in the same area year-round.

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker is a medium-sized bird, measuring approximately 9 inches in length. They have a red head and neck, with black and white barring on their back and wings. Their belly is pale or salmon colored.

In terms of diet, Red-bellied Woodpeckers primarily feed on insects and larvae found in tree bark, as well as nuts and fruits.

These birds can be found in deciduous or mixed forests, particularly near oak and pine trees. They are also known to inhabit suburban areas with mature trees.

In terms of behavior, Red-bellied Woodpeckers typically live in small family groups and communicate through various calls and drumming on trees. They also create nests by excavating holes in dead or dying trees.

Red-bellied Woodpeckers can be seen year-round in Oklahoma, with some potential seasonal fluctuations in population. They are a common sight in the state and can often be spotted actively foraging for food or perched on tree trunks.

Red-bellied Woodpecker range map

American Crow

American Crow

(Corvus brachyrhynchos) is a common and widespread bird found in Oklahoma. They can be identified by their all black feathers, shiny blue-green iridescence, and loud cawing calls.

Crows are omnivorous and will eat just about anything, including insects, fruits, nuts, small animals, and even garbage.

On average, crows measure about 17 to 21 inches in length with a wingspan of 33 to 39 inches.

Crows can be found in a variety of habitats including forests, fields, parks, and urban areas.

In terms of behavior, crows are known for their intelligence and problem-solving abilities. They have also been observed engaging in cooperative hunting, tool use, and even holding funerals for fallen members of their group.

Northern Flicker

Northern Flicker

Northern Flicker is a medium-sized, brown woodland bird with a noticeable black bib and white rump. It has a long, pointed bill for feeding on insects and fruits found on the ground or low vegetation. These birds are commonly found in open woodlands and forest edges throughout Oklahoma.

Their behavior includes drumming on trees or other objects to claim territory and attract mates, as well as “gleaning” or picking food off the ground while hopping.

Their diet consists mainly of insects and fruits, with occasional seeds and nuts. Males have a black spotting on the chest and red patches on the nape, while females have a uniform brown chest with no spots.

Both sexes can be identified by their barred wings and tail and white-edged feathers on the wings. They can range from 9 to 11 inches in length and have a wingspan of up to 15 inches.

Northern Flickers are known to nest in cavities, often using abandoned woodpecker holes or man-made nesting boxes. They may also construct their own nests by carving out soft wood with their strong bills.

These birds are known to mate for life and commonly form small family groups during the non-breeding season. They are also known to migrate, moving south in the winter months to avoid harsh weather conditions.

Northern Flicker range map

Song Sparrow

Song Sparrow

s can be identified by their brown streaked upperparts, white underparts, and distinct dark spot in the middle of their chest. These birds mainly feed on insects and seeds. They have an average length of 5-6 inches and a wingspan of 8-10 inches.

Song Sparrows can be found in a variety of habitats including grasslands, shrublands, marshes, and suburban areas. They are territorial and will defend their territory by singing and chasing intruders away. During breeding season, they build cup-shaped nests on the ground or low in bushes or trees.

They typically lay 3-5 eggs and both parents help care for the young. In Oklahoma, Song Sparrows can be found year-round and are common throughout the state.

House Finch

House Finches

(Haemorhous mexicanus) can be identified by their reddish-brown color with streaks on their breast and back. They are small birds, measuring about 5 to 6 inches in length.

In Oklahoma, they can often be found in open woodlands or suburban areas near human activity where they feed on seeds and grains.

They typically form small flocks and can often be seen perching on telephone wires or bird feeders. They have a melodious song and are known for building cup-shaped nests in trees or on buildings.

Overall, House Finches are common and widespread throughout North America, including Oklahoma. They can adapt well to a variety of habitats and are not currently considered threatened or endangered.

House Finch range map

Downy Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker is a small bird, measuring around 6-7 inches in length with black and white stripes on its back and a white belly. It has a black cap on its head and a short black bill. Its diet consists mainly of insects and their larvae, which it obtains by pecking at tree bark or catching in flight.

In Oklahoma, Downy Woodpeckers can be found in a variety of habitats including deciduous forests, parks, and backyard bird feeders.

They are often seen clinging to tree trunks as they forage for food or nesting materials. These birds are also known for their drumming behavior, where they rapidly peck at objects such as tree trunks or metal poles, creating a loud and repetitive sound.

This behavior is used for communication and territory marking. Overall, the Downy Woodpecker is a common sight in Oklahoma and can easily be identified by its small size and black and white striped plumage.

Tufted Titmouse

tufted titmouse

Tufted Titmouse is a small bird with grey upperparts, a pale underside, and a black forehead with white stripes above the eyes. Their diet consists of insects, seeds, and nuts. They typically grow to be about 5-6 inches in length. In Oklahoma, Tufted Titmice can commonly be found in deciduous woodlands and suburban areas.

These birds are active and social, often found in flocks with other titmice and chickadees. They have a distinctive “peter-peter-peter” call and are known for their acrobatic behavior as they hang upside down to feed on insects.

Eurasian collared dove

Eurasian Collared-Doves

Eurasian collared dove is a medium-sized dove with a small, black half-collar on its nape and a long, pointed tail. Its diet consists primarily of seeds and grains, but it will also eat insects and fruit. In Oklahoma, this bird can be found in open habitats such as farmland and suburbia.

It is known for perching conspicuously on power lines and fence posts. Its behavior includes cooing, wing-flicking, and bowing during courtship displays. It builds flimsy stick nests in trees or on building ledges to raise its young.

The Eurasian collared dove is a non-native species that was introduced to the United States in the 1970s, and has since spread throughout much of the country. It is considered invasive in some areas due to its competition with native dove species for food and nesting sites.

Lesser Prairie-Chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus)

Lesser Prairie-Chicken

Lesser Prairie-Chicken can be identified by their distinct mottled brown and gray plumage, black breast-band, and pointed tail feathers. They primarily feed on insects, black oil sunflower seeds, and grasses found on the ground.

These birds typically measure about 16-18 inches in length and have a wingspan of approximately 25 inches. Their preferred habitat includes grasslands with sparse shrub cover, particularly in areas with low disturbance.

In terms of behavior, Lesser Prairie-Chickens engage in a mating ritual known as “lekking,” where males gather together to display and compete for females.

They are also known to perform wing-whirring displays during the breeding season. Outside of the breeding season, these birds can often be found foraging and roosting in small flocks.

Lesser Prairie-Chicken range map

Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis)

Red-tailed Hawk

Red-tailed Hawks can easily be identified by their rust-colored tail and broad wingspan. In Oklahoma, these birds can often be found soaring above open fields or perching on telephone poles. They primarily feed on small mammals and birds, but will also eat reptiles and insects.

On average, Red-tailed Hawks have a body length of 18-26 inches and a wingspan of 44-52 inches. They prefer open grasslands or sparsely wooded habitats for hunting and nesting.

In terms of behavior, Red-tailed Hawks are monogamous and mate for life. Their nest, called an aerie, is typically built high up on a tree or cliff ledge and can be used for many years. Both the male and female participate in building the nest and raising their young. These birds are also known for their impressive hunting technique, which involves diving towards prey at high speeds.

Red-tailed Hawk range map

Roseate Spoonbill (Platalea ajaja)

Roseate Spoonbill

Roseate Spoonbill can be identified by its pink feathers, black-tipped bill, and red facial skin. These birds primarily feed on crustaceans, aquatic insects, and small fish that they filter from shallow water with their spoon-shaped bills.

They can reach a size of approximately 3 feet in height and have a wingspan of around 4.5 feet. In Oklahoma, they can be found in coastal marshes and occasionally inland wetlands.

Spoonbills are often seen foraging in groups and have been known to nest colonially with other wading birds. In addition to their distinct feeding behavior, these birds also communicate through bill clattering and loud calls.

Roseate Spoonbill range map

Pyrrhuloxia (Cardinalis sinuatus)

Pyrrhuloxia

Pyrrhuloxias is a medium-sized songbird with a distinct crest on its head and a prominent red patch on its face. Its body is grayish-brown with black wings and tail, and it has a heavy, conical bill.

In their natural habitats in the southwestern United States, Pyrrhuloxias primarily feed on seeds, fruits, and insects. They are commonly found in desert scrub and open woodlands.

Pyrrhuloxias often form monogamous pairs and build their nests in cacti or shrubs. They use their thick bills to break open cactus fruits, which they then feed to their young. These birds are known for their loud, repeated calls and songs. They will also mimic the sounds of other birds, as well as mechanical noises.

Pyrrhuloxia range map

Killdeer (Charadrius vociferus)

Killdeer

Killdeer can be easily identified by their characteristic black and white spotted plumage and loud, shrill call. These birds can typically be found near open fields or grasslands, where they forage for insects, crustaceans, and small rodents.

They have also been known to eat berries and seeds in the winter months. Adult killdeer have an average length of about 10-12 inches and can have a wingspan of up to 18 inches.

In terms of behavior, killdeer are known for their unique “broken wing” display, where they feign injury in order to lure predators away from their nest. They also often nest on the ground rather than in trees or bushes. These birds are also highly social, often gathering in large flocks during migration.

In Oklahoma, killdeer can be spotted throughout the year but are most commonly seen during spring and fall migration. They can also be found as permanent residents in certain areas of the state.

Killdeer range map

Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)

Bald Eagle

The bald eagle is one of the most easily identifiable birds in Oklahoma with its distinctive white head and tail and dark brown body. These birds typically have a diet consisting mainly of fish, but will also scavenge for food or hunt small mammals.

Their size ranges from 30-38 inches in length with a wingspan of up to 80 inches. They can be found near water sources such as rivers, lakes, and coastlines.

In terms of behavior, bald eagles are known to mate for life and build large nests made of sticks high up in trees. They will fiercely defend their territory and nesting area from intruders.

These majestic birds were once on the brink of extinction but have made a comeback thanks to conservation efforts. They are currently listed as a federally protected species in the United States.

Bald Eagle range map

Glossy Ibis (Plegadis falcinellus)

Glossy Ibis1

Glossy Ibis can be identified by its iridescent feathers and long, curved bill. They are typically found in wetlands and marsh habitats, where they feed on crustaceans, insects, and small fish.

These birds have a wingspan of approximately 40 inches and weigh about 1-1.5 pounds. Their behavior includes foraging in groups or alone and nesting in colonies with other ibis species.

In Oklahoma, the Glossy Ibis can be found during migratory periods in the spring and fall, as well as year-round along the coast.

Glossy Ibis range map

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Muscivora forficata)

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher is a striking bird found in Oklahoma with long, pinkish-gray tails that can reach up to twice the length of its body. It has a black head and breast, a white belly and wings, and a dark gray back.

These birds primarily feed on insects, catching them mid-flight or plucking them off vegetation. They also eat berries and will occasionally eat small mammals or birds.

Scissor-tailed Flycatchers can reach sizes of 9 to 11 inches in length with a wingspan of 15 to 17 inches.

Their preferred habitat is open grasslands, prairies, and agricultural fields with scattered trees for perching and nesting.

In the spring, Scissor-tailed Flycatchers can often be seen performing acrobatic aerial displays during courtship. They typically nest in tree cavities or on human-made structures, building nests made of grass, twigs, and other plant material. Both the male and female take part in incubating the eggs and caring for the young.

Outside of the breeding season, these birds can be found in flocks with other flycatcher species.

Whooping Crane (Grus americana)

Whooping Crane

Whooping crane can be identified by their white bodies and black wingtips. They have long red crown patches on their heads and long, thin black legs.

Their diet consists mainly of crustaceans, insects, small mammals, and plants.

They can reach heights of up to five feet and have a wingspan of seven to eight feet.

In Oklahoma, they can be found in marshes and wet grasslands.

During mating season, the whooping crane performs elaborate dances and pairs mate for life. They also perform mutual preening, calling, and wing-flapping displays with their mates. Outside of mating season, they are typically solitary or found in small groups.

Whooping cranes have a lifespan of 16 to 22 years in the wild. They are currently listed as endangered due to hunting and habitat loss. Conservation efforts are being made to help increase their population numbers.

Whooping Crane range map

What are common birds in Oklahoma?

Some common birds in Oklahoma include Cardinals, American Robins, Mourning Dove, Northern Flickers, and Blue Jays. Other frequent visitors to the state include Red-winged Blackbirds, Great-tailed Grackles, Barn Swallows, and Eastern Phoebes. Numerous species of waterfowl can also be found in Oklahoma, particularly during migration seasons.

In addition to these common species, Oklahoma is also home to a large number of raptors, including Red-tailed Hawks, Great Horned Owls, and Turkey Vultures. Various species of woodpeckers and sparrows can also be found throughout the state.

What is the rarest bird in Oklahoma?

The rarest bird in Oklahoma is the Attwater’s prairie chicken. This species was once abundant in the coastal grasslands of Texas and Louisiana, but due to loss of habitat and overhunting, its numbers have drastically declined.

As of now, there are only about 100 individuals left in the wild, all of which can be found at the Attwater Prairie Chicken National Wildlife Refuge in southeastern Texas.

The Attwater’s prairie chicken is a brightly-colored bird, with males displaying plumage of reddish-brown feathers and striking yellow eye combs during mating season. These birds are also known for their unique mating displays, which involve inflating air sacs on their neck and making loud booming noises to attract a mate.

The Attwater’s prairie chicken is listed as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, and conservation efforts are ongoing to protect and rebuild its population. However, with such low numbers, it remains the rarest bird in Oklahoma.

What big birds are in Oklahoma?

Some of the most common big birds found in Oklahoma include bald eagles, red-tailed hawks, turkey vultures, northern harriers, and great horned owls.

Other large bird species that can be found in the state include American white pelicans, sandhill cranes, and wood storks. These birds can often be spotted in open fields, forests, wetlands, and along rivers and lakes.

Additionally, many waterfowl such as Canada geese and various species of herons and egrets can also be seen in Oklahoma’s wetlands during migration periods.

How many bird species are there in Oklahoma?

According to the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, there are approximately 433 species of birds in Oklahoma.

These include both resident and migratory birds. Some notable species found in the state include bald eagles, wild turkeys, and red-tailed hawks. Birdwatching and conservation efforts have helped increase the diversity and population of bird species in

What is the most common bird in Oklahoma?

The most commonly seen bird in Oklahoma is the Northern cardinal. These bright red birds can be found year-round in wooded areas and backyards throughout the state. Other common birds in Oklahoma include American robins, mourning doves, and house sparrows.

Bird watching is a popular hobby in Oklahoma, with several resources and organizations dedicated to the observation and conservation of birds in the state.

The Great Plains Nature Center in Tulsa even offers guided bird walks for those interested in learning more about the avian wildlife of Oklahoma.

Bird Feeder

1. The best birdseed to attract a variety of birds is a mix that includes black oil sunflower seeds and millet.

2. It’s important to keep bird feeders clean to prevent the spread of disease among birds. Scrub with hot water and vinegar at least once a month, and refill with fresh seed regularly.

3. Placing bird feeders near dense shrubs or trees will provide shelter for birds and make them feel safer while feeding.

4. Hang multiple bird feeders in different locations to attract a larger diversity of birds.

5. Adding a bird bath or fountain near the feeder will also attract birds, as they need access to water for drinking and bathing.

6. Offering a variety of foods, such as suet, fruit, and nuts, will attract different types of birds to your feeder.

7. It’s important to provide food year-round for birds, as their natural sources may not always be available during the winter months.

8. Bird feeders can also serve as a fun and educational activity for children, helping them connect with nature and learn about different bird species.

9. By providing a steady source of food, bird feeders can also support the local bird population and help them thrive in urban environments.

Winter Birds in Oklahoma

In Oklahoma, you may spot winter birds such as cardinals, juncos, and chickadees. These birds typically gather in flocks to search for food and shelter during the colder months. Bird feeders filled with seeds or suet can attract these feathered friends to your backyard.

By providing a reliable source of food, you can help these birds survive the winter and possibly even spot new species.

Always make sure to keep bird feeders clean to prevent the spread of disease among wild birds. From bright red cardinals to tiny chickadees, observing winter birds in Oklahoma can be a delightful outdoor activity for bird lovers of all ages.