Most Common Birds of Florida

Some of the most common bird species in Florida include American Crows, Northern Cardinals, Red-winged Blackbirds, Great Blue Herons, and Mourning Doves. These birds can be found in various habitats throughout the state, from wetlands to urban areas.

Common Backyard Birds in Florida:

Blue Jays

Blue Jays

Blue Jay, a member of the Corvid family, are easily identified by their bright blue feathers and crest on top of their head. They have a varied diet including nuts and seeds, grains, fruits, insects, and even smaller birds.

In Florida, they can be found in wooded areas or suburban neighborhoods. They are known for their loud calls and clever behavior, such as using tools to obtain food or hiding extra food for later consumption.

They also have a strong social hierarchy and can be aggressive towards other birds while defending their territory. Overall, the Blue Jay is a common sight in Florida and adds a splash of color to any outdoor setting.

Northern mockingbirds

Northern mockingbirds

Northern mockingbirds are easily identified by their gray bodies, white wings, and long tails. They are omnivorous, eating insects, fruits, and seeds. They can reach a size of 10-12 inches in length. In Florida, they can be found inhabiting open fields and suburban areas.

Northern mockingbirds are known for their vocal abilities and will imitate the songs of other birds. They are also known for their territorial behavior, aggressively defending their nests and territories.

Mourning Doves

Mourning Doves

Mourning Doves are easily identified by their slender gray body and long, pointed tail. Their distinct call sounds like a low, mournful cooing.

In Florida, these birds can be found in open fields and near human developments such as farms and residential areas. They mainly feed on seeds, but will also eat insects and fruits.

Mourning Doves typically grow to be about 12 inches in length and have a wingspan of 17-21 inches.

In terms of behavior, these birds are mainly ground foragers, but will also perch on low branches or telephone wires. They often travel in small flocks and can sometimes be seen drinking water at bird baths.

Breeding season occurs in the spring and summer, with pairs building flimsy nests made of twigs in trees or on buildings. Female mourning doves typically lay two white eggs at a time, which hatch after about two weeks. Both parents share in feeding and caring for the young until they are ready to leave the nest.

Mourning Doves are also popular game birds and are commonly hunted during hunting season. Their population, however, remains stable due to their high reproductive rate.

Palm Warbler

Palm Warbler

Palm Warbler, a small songbird, can be identified by its bright yellow underparts and chestnut crown. These birds mainly eat insects and occasionally berries or seeds. They are approximately 4 to 5 inches in size and can be found in open woodlands or wetlands in Florida.

Palm Warblers have a habit of constantly bobbing their tails while foraging on the ground. They also perform a wing-flicking display during courtship. Palm Warblers migrate to the southern US and the Caribbean in the winter before returning to their breeding grounds in the spring.

Palm Warbler range map

Northern Cardinals

Northern Cardinals

(Cardinalis cardinalis) can be easily identified by their bright red plumage and unmistakable crest. They primarily feed on black oil sunflower seeds and insects, but will also eat fruits and nuts. Male cardinals typically measure 21-23 cm in length, while females measure 19-21 cm.

In Florida, Northern Cardinals can be found in a variety of habitats including woodlands, gardens, and backyard bird feeders. These birds are very territorial and will defend their territory by singing loudly and chasing intruders away. They typically mate for life and the male will help to build the nest and care for the young.

Great Crested Flycatcher

Great Crested Flycatcher

Great Crested Flycatcher, a member of the tyrant flycatcher family, can be identified by its grayish-olive upperparts, pale underparts, and crest that it raises when alarmed or aggressive.

Its diet consists primarily of insects, which it catches in mid-air or plucks from tree branches. It ranges in size from 7 to 8 inches in length with a wingspan of 12 inches.

The Great Crested Flycatcher can be found in deciduous or mixed woodlands and forest edges throughout Florida. It is known for its loud, rattling call and aggressive defense of its territory. It constructs a cup-shaped nest made of twigs, grass, and other plant material, often high in the fork of a tree.

Both the male and female participate in nesting and raising their young. This species is not currently threatened or endangered.

Great Crested Flycatcher range map

Carolina Wren

Carolina Wren

Carolina Wrens are small light brown birds with white or buff underparts and a long, curved bill. They have a distinct white eyebrow stripe and a short, upright tail that is often held in a cocked position.

These birds can be found in a variety of habitats including forests, gardens, urban areas, and marshlands.

Their diet consists mainly of insects, spiders, and small fruits.

In terms of behavior, Carolina Wrens are known for their loud and complex songs. They also work together to build their domed nests using sticks and other materials.

In Florida, they can be found year-round in the southern parts of the state and seasonally in northern and central Florida.

Common Grackle

Common Grackle

(Quiscalus quiscula) can be identified by its shiny black feathers and long, pointed tail. Its diet mainly consists of insects, seeds, and grains. These birds typically measure around 11-13 inches in length and have a wingspan of 16-21 inches.

In Florida, they can be found in open areas such as fields and parks, as well as near bodies of water such as lakes and ponds. Grackles are known for their noisy, gregarious behavior in large flocks. They also have a unique vocalization that sounds like a rattle or jay-like call.

Common Grackle range map

Eastern Phoebe

Eastern Phoebe

Eastern Phoebe is a small songbird with dark gray-brown upperparts, pale underparts, and a white throat. It has a broad black bill and yellow feet.

In Florida, Eastern Phoebes can be found near open woodlands, fields, streams, and backyard gardens. They mainly eat insects such as flies, beetles, and caterpillars, but will also eat berries and seeds.

During breeding season, Eastern Phoebes build cup-shaped nests made of moss, mud, and grass on bridges, buildings, or tree branches. They are known for their tail wagging behavior while perched and their loud “phoebe” call.

Tufted Titmouse

tufted titmouse

Tufted Titmice are small birds, gray with a prominent tuft of feathers on its head. Its diet consists mainly of insects and seeds. In Florida, it can be found in wooded areas and gardens.

The titmouse is known for its bold behavior, often joining mixed-species flocks to forage for food and boldly approaching backyard feeders. It also has a recognizable, high-pitched “peter-peter-peter” call.

This bird is also a year-round resident in Florida, but some populations may migrate short distances during the winter. It builds cup-shaped nests in tree cavities or nest boxes and may even use hanging planters or wreaths as a nesting site.

Tufted Titmouse often mate for life and form strong bonds with their mates and family groups. They have been known to help feed and care for young from other titmouse pairs in their group.

Florida Scrub-Jay

Florida Scrub-Jay

Florida Scrub-Jay is a unique and threatened species of bird found only in the scrub habitats of the Florida peninsula. This jay has a blue head, wings, and tail with a gray back and white chest. Their diet consists mainly of acorns, insects, and small vertebrates. They are about 10 inches in length and have a wingspan of 13 inches.

In addition to the scrub habitat, Florida Scrub-Jays can also be found in pine flatwoods and sandhill communities. They are known for their cooperative breeding behavior, with groups of jays helping to raise young together.

They also have a long lifespan for birds, often living up to 15 years in the wild. Protecting this species’ habitat is crucial for their continued survival.

Florida Scrub-Jay range map

American Crow

American Crow

(Corvus brachyrhynchos) can be identified by their glossy black feathers, distinctive cawing sound, and savvy problem-solving abilities. These social birds can often be found in large flocks foraging for food on lawns or fields, including fruits, insects, small animals, and garbage. They can reach lengths of 17-21 inches and have a wingspan of 34-40 inches.

In Florida, American Crows can be found in a variety of habitats including woodlands, farms, and urban areas. They are also known for their clever use of tools, such as dropping nuts onto highways to crack them open and using bread or other food as bait to catch fish.

American Crows are known for their complex communication and social interactions, including funerals for fallen flock members and holding grudges against perceived threats.

They also have the ability to recognize individual human faces, holding grudges against those who have threatened them in the past.

Downy Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker, the smallest woodpecker in North America, can be identified by its black and white barred back, spotted chest, and red patch on the back of its head. It primarily feeds on insects found in tree bark, but also eats fruits and nuts.

In Florida, this bird can typically be found in pine or oak forests, or suburban areas with tall trees.

Their behavior includes drumming on tree trunks to make holes for nest cavities, as well as storing excess food in tree crevices for later consumption.

They often live and forage in small groups, but may also be seen alone or with other bird species.

Roseate Spoonbill

Roseate Spoonbill

Roseate Spoonbill, a member of the ibis and spoonbill family, can be identified by its pink feathers and distinctive spoon-shaped bill. This wading bird primarily feeds on crustaceans, mollusks, and small fish found in shallow water. Adults typically reach a height of 30 inches and have a wingspan of up to four feet.

In Florida, the Roseate Spoonbill can be found in coastal marshes and mangrove swamps. They often forage in groups, using their unique bills to sweep through the water in search of food.

During breeding season, this species builds large stick nests high up in trees or on platforms created by other birds.

Roseate Spoonbill range map

Red-winged Blackbird

Red-winged Blackbird

(Agelaius phoeniceus) is a common bird found throughout Florida. Its distinct characteristics include black feathers with red and yellow patches on the wings.

In terms of diet, Red-winged Blackbirds mainly eat insects and seeds. They forage on the ground or in shallow water for food.

These birds range in size from 7.5 to 9.8 inches in length and have a wingspan of 11.8 to 14.6 inches.

Red-winged Blackbirds can be found in a variety of habitats, including marshes, wetlands, fields, and even suburban areas.

In terms of behavior, Red-winged Blackbirds are very territorial and can often be seen standing on top of tall grass or cattails, loudly singing their characteristic “konk-la-ree” song. They form large flocks during the nonbreeding season.

During the breeding season, males establish and defend their territories by performing a display flight and vocalizing. Females build the nest and care for the young.

Tree Swallows

Tree Swallow

Tree Swallows, identified by their iridescent blue-green upperparts and white underparts, have a diet consisting mainly of insects.

They can reach sizes of 5 to 6 inches in length and can be found in open habitats such as fields, marshes, and meadows. In Florida, Tree Swallows are commonly seen hovering above water or flying low to catch insects. They also build cup-shaped nests in tree cavities or man-made nest boxes.

During the breeding season, Tree Swallows form large flocks, but they are often seen alone or in pairs during non-breeding times. In Florida, they can be found year-round and do not migrate like some other swallow species.

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker, a medium-sized bird, can be identified by its red head and chest, black and white barred wings, and white spotted back. Its diet consists mainly of insects and nuts, which it obtains by using its strong bill to peck tree bark or drill into wood.

In Florida, this species can be found in open woods or forest edges. They may also be spotted at backyard bird feeders.

In addition to foraging for food, red-bellied woodpeckers also use their bills to excavate nest holes in dead trees or utility poles. They are known for drumming on surfaces with their bills, possibly as a form of communication or territory marking. They form monogamous pairs and raise their young together.

This species is often seen climbing up tree trunks in search of food, but they can also be agile flyers. They have been known to migrate south for the winter, though some may stay year-round in Florida.

Red-bellied Woodpecker range map

Gray Catbird

Gray Catbird

Gray Catbird, a member of the Mimidae family, can be identified by its gray feathers, black cap, and long tail. Its diet consists mainly of insects and fruits.

This bird averages about 9 inches in length with a wingspan of 12-13 inches. In Florida, Gray Catbirds can be found in shrubby habitats such as wetlands, forests, and urban parks.

They are known for their playful behavior, including imitating the calls of other birds, and for building elaborate nests with materials such as leaves, grass, and twigs.

Boat-tailed Grackle

Boat-tailed Grackle

Boat-tailed Grackle, also known as the Great-tailed Grackle, is a common bird found in Florida. It can be identified by its glossy black feathers and long, boat-shaped tail. Its diet consists mainly of insects, fruits, and grains.

On average, Boat-tailed Grackles measure about 12 inches in length and have a wingspan of 18 inches. They can typically be found in open habitats, such as marshes, farmland, and suburban areas.

In terms of behavior, Boat-tailed Grackles are known to be very social birds. They often gather in large flocks and can be quite loud with their distinct cackling calls. Additionally, they may also display aggressive behavior towards other bird species in order to protect their territory.

Boat-tailed Grackle range map

American Robin

American Robin

(Turdus migratorius) is a common bird found throughout Florida. It has a distinct orange breast and gray upperparts, with a black head and white throat. Its diet consists mainly of worms, insects, and fruits.

The American Robin can reach lengths of around 10 inches and have an average wingspan of 16 inches. They can be found in a variety of habitats such as urban areas, forests, or open fields. These birds are often seen on lawns or in trees, and they form large flocks during the winter months.

They are known for their loud and melodious songs, which can often be heard at dawn and dusk. American Robins are also adept at flight, using their strong wings for migratory purposes.

American Robin range map

Limpkin

Limpkin

Limpkin, a wading bird found in Florida, can be identified by its long curved bill and brown and white striped feathers. Its diet consists mainly of apple snails, which it cracks open with its specialized bill. Limpkins typically reach about 20 inches in length and can be found in marshes, swamps, ponds, and lakes throughout the state.

These solitary birds tend to hunt during the night and spend their days resting in dense vegetation. They are also known for their distinctive, haunting calls that can often be heard echoing through wetlands.

It is important to protect and preserve the habitats of the Limpkin, as they play a vital role in controlling snail populations. Unfortunately, their numbers have been declining due to loss of wetland areas and pollution.

By taking steps to conserve and restore these crucial ecosystems, we can ensure the survival of the Limpkin and other wetland species.

Limpkin range map

Brown Noddy

Brown Noddy

Brown Noddy seabirds can be identified by their dark brown plumage, long pointed wings, and slender bill. These birds primarily feed on small fish and crustaceans found near the surface of the water. They typically measure about 12 inches in length with a wingspan of 28 inches.

Brown Noddies can be found nesting on tropical islands throughout the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico, including in Florida. They typically nest in large colonies on flat, open ground near the ocean.

In terms of behavior, Brown Noddies are known to engage in cooperative breeding where several individuals help feed and care for young chicks. These birds also perform spectacular courtship displays involving aerial acrobatics and diving into the water.

Additionally, they are highly social and can often be seen in large flocks along coastal areas.

Laughing Gulls

Laughing Gull

Laughing Gull, also known as “charcoal-backs,” can be identified by their dark gray back and white underparts. They have a black head with a white ring around the eye and bill, and red legs. These birds mainly feed on small fish, crustaceans, and insects.

The average size of a Laughing Gull ranges from 16-18 inches in length and a wingspan of 36-40 inches.

These birds can be found along coastlines, but also inhabit inland ponds, estuaries, and wetlands. They are often seen in large flocks at garbage dumps or beaches where they scavenge for food.

During breeding season, Laughing Gulls can be aggressive towards other birds and will defend their territory. They nest in colonies, often on the ground among vegetation or on man-made structures such as docks or piers. Their call is a high-pitched “kree-ar” sound.

Laughing Gull range map

Anhinga

Anhinga1

Anhinga, also known as a “snakebird” or “water turkey”, can be identified by its long, narrow neck and black plumage with glossy iridescent feathers. These birds are often seen perched with wings spread out to dry, or swimming low in the water with just their head and neck visible.

In Florida, Anhingas mainly feed on fish, but will also eat amphibians, reptiles, and small mammals.

Anhingas can reach lengths of up to 37 inches and have a wingspan of around 51 inches.

They can be found in freshwater wetlands, swamps, marshes, ponds, and lakes.

Anhingas are solitary birds and can often be spotted hunting alone or nesting in isolated trees. They use their sharp, dagger-like bill to spear prey underwater before bringing it to the surface to eat. These birds also use their feathers to help them hunt, using them like fingers to hold onto slippery fish.

Anhinga range map

Fulvous Whistling-Duck

Fulvous Whistling-Duck

Fulvous Whistling-Duck is a medium-sized duck with a long neck and dark brown body. Its most distinguishing feature is its bright orange bill and legs.

This species can be found in freshwater marshes, ponds, and flooded agricultural fields in Florida.

Their diet consists mainly of plant material such as seeds and grains, but they also eat small invertebrates.

Fulvous Whistling-Ducks typically form small flocks and are often seen perching on vegetation or on top of buildings. They have a distinctive high-pitched whistle, hence their name.

With an average length of 20-24 inches and weight of 1.6-2.4 pounds, Fulvous Whistling-Ducks are on the larger side for ducks in Florida.

Fulvous Whistling-Duck range map

Smooth-Billed Ani – Crotophaga ani

Smooth-Billed Ani

In Florida, the Smooth-Billed Ani can be identified by its glossy black feathers and long tail. This bird has a unique bill that curves downward and is smooth to the touch.

The Smooth-Billed Ani primarily feeds on insects and fruit found in open fields and forest edges.

On average, this bird measures approximately 11 inches in length and has a wingspan of 16 inches.

The Smooth-Billed Ani can typically be found in open areas with scattered trees and shrubs, including pastures, orchards, and residential areas.

In terms of behavior, the Smooth-Billed Ani is often seen foraging on the ground in small flocks.

They also engage in group nesting and cooperative breeding, with multiple individuals helping to build the nest and care for young.

This bird species is not currently threatened or endangered in Florida. However, habitat loss and degradation may pose potential threats to their populations in the future.

Smooth-billed Ani range map

Spot Breasted Oriole – Icterus pectoralis

Spot Breasted Oriole

The Spot Breasted Oriole can be easily identified by its bright orange and black plumage, with spots on its breast. These birds primarily feed on fruits, insects, and nectar. They are medium-sized birds, measuring roughly 7 inches in length.

In Florida, the Spot Breasted Oriole can typically be found in open woodlands, mangroves, and residential areas with tall trees.

They are known for their acrobatic behavior, often hanging upside down to feed on fruits or insects. These birds build hanging pouch nests in tree branches and typically lay 2-4 eggs per clutch.

Spot-breasted Oriole range map

Painted Bunting – Passerina ciris

Painted Bunting

Painted Bunting – is a small, brightly colored bird found in Florida. Its identifying characteristics include a green back, blue head and wings, and red underparts. It primarily feeds on seeds and insects.

Painted Buntings typically inhabit open woodlands and scrubby habitats. They are known to be shy and secretive birds, often keeping to the cover of dense vegetation. During breeding season, males can often be seen singing from high perches to attract a mate.

Painted Buntings are considered a threatened species in Florida due to habitat loss and illegal trapping for the pet trade. Conservation efforts have been put in place to protect these beautiful birds.

Painted Bunting range map

Eastern Towhee – Pipilo erythrophthalmus

Eastern Towhee

The Eastern Towhee can easily be identified by its black plumage, white underparts, and red eyes. They have a large, thick bill which they use to forage for seeds, fruits, insects, and small invertebrates on the ground.

In Florida, the Eastern Towhee can be found in forest edges, thickets, and scrublands. They also often make appearances in backyards and neighborhood parks.

During breeding season, male Eastern Towhees can be seen performing a courtship display called “dripping,” where they fluff their feathers and drop down from a perch while singing. They also engage in territorial behavior, using their loud and distinctive “drink-your-tea” call to defend their territory and attract mates.

Eastern Towhees are fairly large birds, measuring about 10 inches in length with a wingspan of 14 inches. They weigh around 1.5 ounces.

Burrowing Owls

Burrowing Owls

Burrowing Owls are small owls with long legs and a round head. They have brown feathers with white spotting on their breasts and a white outlining around their facial features.

Their diet consists mainly of insects and small rodents, which they hunt during the night or early morning.

In Florida, Burrowing Owls can be found in open grasslands or prairies, where they dig burrows or take over abandoned ground squirrel tunnels for their homes.

These owls are known for their playful behavior, often seen standing on one leg or hopping around on the ground. They can also be aggressive towards intruders and will defend their territory by diving and screeching at trespassers.

Due to loss of habitat and predation by domestic cats, the Burrowing Owl is listed as a species of special concern in Florida. Conservation efforts are being made to protect and increase their population in the state.

Burrowing Owl range map

Reddish egret

Reddish egret1

Reddish egret, a large wading bird found primarily in Florida, can be identified by its bright reddish-orange plumage and long, slender black bill.

This species typically feeds on small fish and crustaceans, snatched up from shallow water with quick darting movements. The reddish egret can reach up to 24 inches in length and prefers coastal habitats such as tidal flats and mangrove islands.

During breeding season, the birds perform elaborate courtship displays, including stretching their wings and hopping along the water’s surface. Overall, reddish egrets are considered to be uncommon but can often be spotted along coastal areas in Florida.

Reddish Egret range map

Purple Gallinules

Purple Gallinules

Purple Gallinules, also known as “swamphens,” can be found in marshy wetlands throughout Florida. They have distinctive purple feathers, red forehead patches, and yellow feet. Their diet consists of aquatic plants, insects, frogs, and crustaceans.

These birds typically measure between 11-13 inches in length and have a wingspan of 17-20 inches.

In addition to wetland habitats, Purple Gallinules can also be found in mangrove forests and even flooded agricultural fields. They forage for food by walking on aquatic plants or floating on the water’s surface.

During breeding season, male Purple Gallinules perform elaborate courtship displays, such as puffing up their chest and spreading their tail feathers. They build floating nests made of reeds and other aquatic plants, and both parents take turns incubating the eggs and caring for the chicks. These birds can have up to three broods a year.

Purple Gallinule range map

Long-Billed Curlew

Long-Billed Curlew

Long-Billed Curlew is a large shorebird with a curved bill, brown upperparts, and buff underparts. Its diet consists mainly of insects, worms, crustaceans, and small mollusks.

In Florida, Long-Billed Curlews can typically be found in coastal marshes and beaches. They are known for their “sky dancing” behavior during mating season, where they fly high in circles and dive steeply. They also perform elaborate displays on the ground with their long bills.

During non-breeding season, they can often be found foraging in large flocks. Their populations have been declining due to loss of habitat and human disturbance.

Conservation efforts for this species include protecting coastal marshes and limiting human disturbance during breeding season.

Long-billed Curlew range map

Swallow-Tailed Kites

Swallow-Tailed Kite

Swallow-Tailed Kites are easily identified by their long, forked tails and white heads and chests. These birds primarily eat small vertebrates, such as tree frogs and lizards, which they catch mid-flight with their sharp talons.

They have an average wingspan of 4 feet and can be found in open woodlands or wetlands in Florida during the nesting season. These kites are known for their acrobatic flight abilities and can often be seen soaring high above the treetops. Outside of the nesting season, they can be found throughout South America.

During breeding season, Swallow-Tailed Kites build their nests in tall trees and lay 1-3 eggs at a time. Both parents take turns incubating the eggs and feeding the hatchlings until they are ready to leave the nest. These birds typically mate for life and will often return to the same nesting area each year.

Due to loss of habitat and pesticide use, Swallow-Tailed Kite populations have declined in recent years. Conservation efforts aimed at protecting their habitats and controlling pesticide use are crucial for the continued survival of this species.

Swallow-tailed Kite range map

Short-tailed Hawk

Short-tailed Hawk

The Short-tailed Hawk is a small raptor with dark brown upperparts and pale underparts with fine barring. It has a short, rounded tail and yellow legs and feet. Its diet consists mainly of rodents and insects.

In Florida, the Short-tailed Hawk can typically be found in open grasslands or marshes. It hunts by perching and watching for prey, or by flying low over open areas in search of food. It may also participate in group hunting with other raptors.

Additional identifying characteristics of the Short-tailed Hawk include a dark mustache mark on its face and a black “thumb” mark on the leading edge of its wing. Male and female Short-tailed Hawks are similar in appearance, with the female being slightly larger. Adult birds have a wingspan of 18-22 inches and weigh 8-14 ounces.

Short-tailed Hawk range map

White-crested Pigeons

White-crested Pigeon

White-crested Pigeons are easily identifiable by their white crest on top of their head and gray body with black wingtips. They are typically found near mangrove forests, where they feed on fruits, seeds, and small invertebrates.

They typically measure around 12 inches in length and can be seen flying or perching in trees alone or in small flocks. Their behavior includes cooing and bobbing their heads up and down.

They can be found in southern Florida near mangrove forests, such as Everglades National Park. They are also known to visit backyard bird feeders. These pigeons are considered to be a species of least concern by the IUCN Red List.

Mottled Duck

Mottled Duck

(Anas fulvigula) is a medium-sized duck found commonly in Florida’s marshes, ponds, and lakes. They have brown mottled feathers on their body with a darker head and tail, a pale ring around the eye, and orange legs and feet.

Their diet consists mainly of aquatic plants, insects, and crustaceans.

Mottled Ducks typically reach a length of 17-21 inches and a wingspan of 29-34 inches.

In terms of behavior, Mottled Ducks are typically seen in small flocks or pairs. They are known to be quite territorial during breeding season, with males performing displays such as head pumping and wing raising to defend their territory and attract a mate.

Mottled Duck range map

Snail Kite

Snail Kite

Snail Kite is a medium-sized bird found in Florida wetlands. It can be identified by its dark grey feathers, hooked bill, and forked tail. Its diet consists mainly of apple snails, which it plucks out of their shells using its specialized bill. In terms of size, Snail Kites are about 16 inches in length with a wingspan of approximately 3 feet.

In terms of habitat, Snail Kites can be found in marshes and swamps with large populations of apple snails. They also nest in these wetland areas, building stick nests high up in trees.

Snail Kites are solitary birds, but will gather in small groups when feeding on abundant food sources. They are known for their cooperative feeding behavior, in which multiple kites will work together to flush out and capture snails.

Snail Kite range map

White Ibis

White Ibis1

White Ibises are a common sight in Florida, with their long, curved bill and white plumage. They mainly feed on crustaceans and insects found in wetlands, marshes, and beaches. Adult White Ibises can reach up to 24 inches in length and have a wingspan of approximately 39 inches.

In addition to wetland areas, they can also be found in freshwater and saltwater marshes, mangroves, mudflats, pastures, fields, and lawns.

In terms of behavior, White Ibises often forage as groups, using their bills to probe the ground for food. They also engage in cooperative feeding, with individuals taking turns stirring up prey or passing food to one another. During breeding season, they build large stick nests in trees and will defend their territory aggressively.

White Ibis range map

What type of birds are common in Florida?

Some common bird species in Florida include the American white ibis, red-winged blackbird, great blue heron, Northern cardinal, and mourning dove. Others such as the roseate spoonbill and bald eagle can also be found in certain areas of the state.

Florida’s diverse habitats including wetlands, forests, and coastlines attract a wide variety of bird species. Birdwatching is a popular pastime in Florida, with the Everglades and Dry Tortugas National Park being particularly popular destinations for bird enthusiasts.

How do I identify a bird in my backyard?

One way to identify a bird in your backyard is by observing its physical characteristics, such as size and coloration. Another way is to listen for its unique calls or songs.

You can also consult field guides or online resources to compare the bird’s appearance and sounds with known species in your area. Using binoculars or a camera can also help with identification.

What tropical birds are in Florida?

The most common tropical bird in the state is the Great Egret, often seen wading in shallow water or perched on tree branches. Other tropical birds residents include Roseate Spoonbills, Anhingas, limpkins, wood storks, and reddish egrets. Florida also has a large population of exotic escaped or released pet birds such as parrots, macaws, and peacocks.

Bird watching enthusiasts can also see a variety of migratory tropical species during the winter months. Some notable examples include the Mangrove Cuckoo, Black-whiskered Vireo, and Bay-breasted Warbler. Florida’s warm climate and diverse habitats make it a haven for both native and visiting tropical bird species.

Spectacular Florida Birds:

From the beautiful pink plumage of the Roseate Spoonbill to the bright orange feathers of the American Flamingo, Florida is a birdwatcher’s paradise. With over 500 species of birds living in or migrating through the state, there is always something new to see.

And with numerous national wildlife refuges and parks, as well as countless beaches and wetlands, there are plenty of opportunities to spot these feathered friends.