Most Common Birds of Louisiana

Louisiana is a great place to bird watch. In fact, the state is home to more than 460 species of birds! Of these, some are more common than others. In this blog post, we will take a look at the 10 most common birds in Louisiana. These birds can be found in a variety of habitats, including forests, wetlands, and even urban areas. So if you’re looking for a good bird watching spot in Louisiana, keep reading!

Common Backyard Birds in Louisiana:

Northern Cardinals

Cardinals are one of the most easily recognizable birds in North America. They are a common sight in backyards and gardens across the United States, and they are also the official state bird of seven states. Cardinals are relatively large songbirds, measuring about nine inches in length from beak to tail.

Adult males have bright red plumage, while females and juveniles are drab brown birds. Cardinals are seed eaters, and they are often seen feeding on black oil sunflower seeds and other small fruits.

Cardinals typically live in wooded areas near sources of water. They build their nests in trees or shrubs, and they often reuse the same nesting site year after year. Cardinals are monogamous birds, meaning that they mate for life.

Both males and females help to build the nest and care for the young. Cardinals are very vocal birds, and they sing a variety of songs throughout the year. Male cardinals are particularly known for their loud, repetitive calls.

Cardinals are active during the day, and they can often be seen perching on tree branches or flying from place to place in search of food. Cardinals are not migratory birds, so they can be seen in Louisiana all year round.

Northern mockingbirds

Northern mockingbirds are medium-sized songbirds with grayish-brown upperparts and white underparts. They have a long tail and wings, and a black cap on their head. Northern mockingbirds are found in open areas throughout the southeastern United States, including Louisiana.

These birds feed on insects, berries, and other small prey items. Northern mockingbirds typically nest in trees or shrubs, and their behavior includes singing, mimicry, and territoriality. These birds can be helpful to humans because they help control insect populations.

However, they can also become pests if they build their nests too close to houses or other structures. Northern mockingbirds are protected by state and federal laws in the United States.

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

The Ruby-crowned Kinglet is a small songbird with a distinctive ruby-red crown. These birds are found in wooded areas across North America and are known for their high-pitched twittering calls. Kinglets are tiny birds, measuring just over four inches in length.

They have olive-green upperparts and pale gray underparts. The male Ruby-crowned Kinglet has a bright red crown, which is usually only visible when the bird is excited or singing.

Kinglets are insectivores and primarily eat spiders and small insects. They forage rapidly through trees and bushes, using their long claws to cling to branches. In the winter months, kinglets will also eat small berries.

Ruby-crowned Kinglets are non-migratory birds and can be found in their breeding territories year-round. These birds build their nests in trees or shrubs, using spider webs and other materials to construct a cup-shaped nest.

Red-winged Blackbird

(Agelaius phoeniceus)

The Red-winged Blackbird is a species of true blackbird in the family Icteridae. The male has black feathers with red wing bars and yellow eyes. The female usually has dark brown feathers.

These birds are found in marshes and wetlands across North America. They eat insects, small fish, and amphibians. The Red-winged Blackbird is about 16 cm long with a wingspan of 30 cm. It weighs about 35 grams.

The male Red-winged Blackbird is very territorial during the breeding season. He will build several nests and try to attract as many females as possible. The female will usually lay her eggs in the male’s nest. The young birds will fledge (leave the nest) after about two weeks.

White-throated Sparrow

White-throated Sparrows are a small songbird with a brown back, white belly, and striking yellow eyes. They have a white throat and breast with dark streaks.

White-throated Sparrows are found in woods and brushy areas across North America. They eat insects and seeds. White-throated Sparrows are about six inches long.

In Louisiana, White-throated Sparrows are found in woods and brushy areas. They eat insects and seeds. White-throated Sparrows are about six inches long.

White-throated Sparrows have a few different calls, but the most commonly heard is a three-note whistle: o-wee-o. The first note is lower than the others and may be omitted.

This bird’s song is a series of clear notes that rise and fall in pitch, often ending with two trills: whit-a-wee-ooh. White-throated Sparrows also sing at night.

Eastern Phoebe

The Eastern Phoebe is a small songbird with drab brown upperparts and light underparts. It has a black bill, dark wings, and two white wing bars. The tail is often cocked up at an angle. Phoebes are known for their lack of fear around humans.

This bird can be found near streams and other water sources in wooded areas or near human habitation. It nests in crevices, often using man-made structures such as buildings or bridges.

The diet of the Eastern Phoebe consists of insects and spiders which it catches by flying from a perch to snatch them out of the air.

The Eastern Phoebe is a small songbird, measuring only about six inches in length. It has a wingspan of nine to ten inches. This bird is found in the eastern United States and Canada. It winters in the southern United States, Mexico, and Central America.

American Goldfinch

The American Goldfinch is a small, sprightly songbird. It is about the size of a house finch, with a wingspan of approximately five inches. The adult male has yellow plumage with black wings and tail; the female is paler overall.

Juvenile birds are brownish-gray with streaks on their breast and back. The American Goldfinch is found in open woodlands, meadows, and gardens across the United States. It is a seedsnacker, eating primarily thistle and sunflower seeds. In the winter months, it will also feed on berries and tree buds.

The American Goldfinch is a social bird, often seen in flocks of ten or more birds. It is a vocal bird, with a distinctive “per-chic-o-ree” song. The American Goldfinch is the state bird of Iowa, New Jersey, and Washington. It is also the national bird of Trinidad and Tobago.

Yellow-rumped Warbler

(Setophaga coronata), previously classified as Dendroica coronata, is a small songbird. Identification characteristics include yellow rump, black streaks on sides, and white wing bars. This warbler also has a relatively long bill.

The diet of the Yellow-rumped Warbler mainly consists of insects although they will consume berries during the winter. These birds are relatively small, measuring around five inches in length.

The Yellow-rumped Warbler breeds in coniferous forests across North America and winters primarily in the southern United States, Mexico, and Central America. Although these birds are not considered shy, they are often difficult to observe since they spend most of their time high up in trees.

The song of the Yellow-rumped Warbler is a series of high notes that descend in pitch, often compared to the sound of a bouncing ball. Nesting generally takes place in May or June and clutches usually contain four eggs.

Carolina Chickadee

The Carolina Chickadee is a small songbird with a black cap and bib, white cheeks, and a gray back. These birds are found in forests throughout the eastern United States. Chickadees are acrobatic little birds that often hang upside down while feeding on insects or seeds.

They will also store food for the winter months. Carolina Chickadees are non-migratory and will stay in their territories year-round. These birds nest in holes in trees, often using abandoned woodpecker nests.

Chickadees will also use man-made nesting boxes. You can attract them to your yard by providing bird feeders with sunflower seeds or suet.

Barn Swallows

Barn Swallows are one of the most widespread birds in the world. They can be found on every continent except Antarctica. In North America, they are most common in the western United States and southern Canada. Barn Swallows are easily recognizable with their long, forked tails and reddish-brown upperparts. They have a wingspan of about 16 inches and weigh about an ounce.

These birds are most often seen near open fields and marshes where they hunt for insects. Their diet consists mostly of flying insects such as beetles, flies, grasshoppers, and wasps. Barn Swallows typically build their nests on structures like barns, bridges, and cliffs. They use mud to construct their nests which can contain up to six eggs.

During the nesting season, Barn Swallows are very protective of their young and will often dive-bomb predators or humans that come too close. Once the chicks have hatched and are old enough to fly, the parents will teach them how to hunt for insects. After a few weeks, the chicks will be on their own and the parents will begin to migrate south for the winter.

Common Grackle

The Common Grackle is a large blackbird with a long tail and yellow eyes. These birds are found in open areas such as fields, parks, and wetlands. They eat insects, small mammals, and seeds. Common Grackles are about 12 inches long with a wingspan of 18 inches.

Behavior:

Common Grackles are social birds that often travel in large flocks. They can be aggressive towards other birds and will sometimes steal their food. These birds are also known to make a variety of noises including clicks, cackles, and squeaks.

Habitat:

Common Grackles are found in open areas such as fields, parks, and wetlands. In the winter, they will also be found in wooded areas and forests.

Diet:

Common Grackles eat insects, small mammals, and seeds. They will also eat fruits and vegetables.

Size:

Common Grackles are about 12 inches long with a wingspan of 18 inches. These birds weigh between four and six ounces.

Identifying Characteristics:

The Common Grackle is a large blackbird with a long tail and yellow eyes. The male bird has glossy blue-black feathers, while the female bird has duller brown feathers. Both sexes have long tails and yellow eyes. The juvenile birds look similar to the adults but have browner feathers.

Downy Woodpecker

(Picoides pubescens)

The downy woodpecker is the smallest woodpecker in North America, measuring just six to seven inches in length. It has a black body with white stripes running down its back, a black tail, and a small black bill. The male bird has a red patch on the back of its head, while the female has a white patch.

The downy woodpecker is found in woods and forests across North America. It feeds on insects, spiders, and berries. The bird nests in tree cavities, often using the same nest site for several years in a row. The downy woodpecker is a non-migratory bird, meaning it stays in the same area year-round.

House Sparrow

House Sparrows are small birds with brown upperparts and gray underparts. They have a short tail and stout bill. The male has a black throat and gray crown. Females and young birds are brownish-gray overall.

These sparrows are found in open habitats such as fields, parking lots, and city parks. They nest in cavities such as holes in trees, buildings, and nest boxes. House Sparrows eat mostly seeds and insects.

They will also visit bird feeders. These sparrows are about six inches long with a wingspan of eight inches.

Red-bellied Woodpecker

The red-bellied woodpecker is a small to medium-sized woodpecker with a black and white striped back, wings and tail.

The belly and sides of the head are reddish, and there is a red cap on the male. This bird can be found in woods and forests across North America. It feeds on insects, nuts and berries.

The red-bellied woodpecker is a cavity nester, meaning it will excavate a hole in a tree to build its nest. These birds are known for their loud drumming, which they use to communicate and mark their territory.

Mourning Doves

Mourning doves range in size from 11 to 13 inches in length and have a wingspan of 18 to 21 inches. The adult has gray-brown upperparts, pale gray underparts, a pinkish breast, and black spots on its sides.

Its tail is long and pointed, with white edges on the outer feathers. The Mourning Dove is the official state bird of Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, North Carolina, South Dakota and Tennessee.

Mourning doves are ground feeders and eat mostly seeds. They forage on the ground in flocks or pairs, scratching at the soil with their feet to uncover food. They also eat insects and snails. Mourning doves drink by sucking up water and then tilting their head back to let it run down their throat into their body.

Mourning doves are found in open woodlands, farmland, suburban areas, and city parks. They build flimsy nests of twigs in trees or shrubs, or on the ground. The female lays two white eggs. The young hatch in about two weeks and leave the nest after another two weeks.

Blue Jays

Blue Jays are one of the most common birds in North America. They are easily identified by their blue feathers and white chest. The diet of a Blue Jay consists mostly of insects and nuts.

They are medium sized birds that typically live in wooded areas. Blue Jays are known to be aggressive birds that will defend their territory from other animals.

Although they are not typically considered to be a nuisance, they can become a problem if they build their nests too close to human dwellings. Blue Jays are interesting birds to watch and can provide hours of entertainment.

Carolina Wren

Carolina Wrens are small songbirds with brown upperparts and a buff belly. They have a white stripe above the eye and a long tail that is often cocked. Males and females look alike.

Carolina Wrens eat mostly insects, but they will also eat berries and fruits. In the winter, they will form flocks and forage together.

Carolina Wrens are found in the southeastern United States. They prefer woodlands, but they will also live in gardens and parks. Carolina Wrens build their nests in tree cavities, stumps, or logs.

European Starlings

European Starlings are small to medium-sized birds with short necks and legs. They have black feathers with iridescent spots of green, purple, and bronze. Their bills are short and pointed. European Starlings eat insects, berries, and fruits. They can be found in open woodlands, fields, and gardens.

European Starlings are not shy birds and will often approach humans. They are known to be aggressive towards other birds and will fight for nesting sites. European Starlings are interesting birds to watch and can provide hours of entertainment.

American Crowd

American Crowders are small, stocky birds with short legs and tails. They have strong bills for crushing seeds, and they often feed on the ground. These birds usually live in open woodlands or scrublands.

American Crowders are social birds that often travel in small flocks. They are also known to be aggressive toward other bird species.

One of the most distinguishing features of American Crowders is their loud, raucous calls. These birds are also known for their striking plumage. Male American Crowders have gray bodies with black wings and tail feathers.

They also have a white patch on their throat and breast. Female American Crowders are similar in appearance to males, but they tend to be duller in color.

Song Sparrow

Song Sparrows are one of the most common birds in North America. You can find them in nearly every habitat, from backyards to mountaintops. They’re small songbirds with streaked brown plumage and rusty breasts. Their diet consists mostly of insects, but they will also eat seeds and berries.

In Louisiana, Song Sparrows are most often found in woodlands and forests. They typically nest in trees or shrubs, but will also build their nests on the ground. Their behavior is mostly diurnal, meaning they are active during the day. However, they will sometimes sing at night.

House Finch

The House Finch is a common bird in North America. The adult male has red on its head, breast, and back. The female is mostly brown with some streaking. These birds are about five and a half to six inches long with a wingspan of about nine inches.

They eat mainly seeds but will also eat insects. You can find them in open woodlands, farmlands, and urban areas. They build their nests in trees, shrubs or man-made structures. The House Finch is a social bird that forms flocks when not breeding. It is also known to hybridize with the Purple Finch.

These birds are not migratory and will stay in their territories year-round. House Finches are known to carry a disease that can be deadly to other birds, so if you have pet birds it is best to keep them away from wild birds.

Pileated Woodpeckers

Pileated Woodpeckers are the largest woodpeckers in North America, measuring about 17-19 inches in length with a wingspan of 26-28 inches. They are black with white stripes on their face and neck, and have a prominent red crest.

Both male and female Pileated Woodpeckers have these characteristics, but the males also have a red moustache. These woodpeckers are strong fliers and can often be seen soaring between trees in search of food.

Pileated Woodpeckers eat mostly insects, including ants, beetles, wasps, and termites. They also eat fruits, nuts, and berries. To find food, they use their long tongue to probe into crevices in tree bark. Pileated Woodpeckers leave behind telltale signs of their feeding activities, including large rectangular holes in trees.

Purple Martin

(Progne subis) is the largest member of the swallow family in North America. Adult purple martins are about 16 cm (​63⁄64 in) long with a 31 cm (12 in) wingspan and they weigh 50–60 g (​17⁄60 – 21⁄40 oz). The adult male has glossy dark purple plumage, while the adult female has duller blue-black plumage. Juveniles have dark gray plumage.

These birds can be found in open habitats near water such as marshes, ponds, lakes, and rivers. They forage in flight for flying insects such as bees, wasps, beetles, dragonflies, and flying ants.

Purple martins are gregarious birds that nest in colonies. They use man-made nesting structures such as birdhouses or martin boxes. A typical colony can have up to 100 pairs of purple martins. These birds are known for their aerial displays and vocalizations. They produce a variety of sounds including chirps, cheeps, squeaks, and twittering.

Eurasian Collared-Doves

Eurasian Collared-Doves are medium-sized doves with small bodies and long necks. They have a pale grey body with darker wings and a black collar around their neck. Their diet consists of seeds, fruits, and insects.

They are found in open woodlands, farmlands, and gardens. Eurasian Collared-Doves are gentle and shy birds. They are usually seen in pairs or small groups. They make soft cooing sounds and are known to roost in large numbers.

The Eurasian Collared-Dove is a non-native species that was introduced to North America in the 1970s. It is now one of the most widespread dove species in the world. In Louisiana, they are commonly seen in urban and suburban areas.

They are a common sight at bird feeders and can often be seen perching on power lines or fences. Eurasian Collared-Doves are not currently considered a conservation concern, but their impact on native bird populations is not well understood.

Pine Warbler

The Pine Warbler is a small songbird with yellowish-olive upperparts and pale yellow underparts. It has a white eye-ring, black bill, and two white wing bars. The male has a yellow throat and breast. The female has a whitish throat and breast.

Both sexes have a rusty cap during the breeding season. The Pine Warbler breeds in pine forests and pine-oak woodlands of the southeastern United States. It winters in the southern United States, Mexico, and the West Indies.

The Pine Warbler is a nonmigratory bird. Diet consists mostly of insects and spiders, but also include fruits and berries.

Orange-crowned Warbler

The Orange-crowned Warbler is a small songbird with olive-green upperparts and yellow underparts. It has a white throat and eyebrow, and a thin orange line extends from its bill to behind its eye.

This warbler is often found in open woodlands, scrublands, and gardens. It feeds on insects, spiders, and other small invertebrates. The Orange-crowned Warbler is a migratory bird, wintering in Mexico and Central America.

Northern Flicker

The Northern Flicker is a medium-sized bird with a strong bill and long wings. The back is brownish with black bars, the underparts are pale with black streaks, and the tail is dark with white bars. The head has a red cap that extends down the nape, and there is a small yellow patch on each side of the face.

The male has a black mustache mark, while the female does not. Northern Flickers are often seen perching on tree trunks or power lines and flying to the ground to feed on ants and other insects. They also eat berries, fruits, and seeds. In Louisiana, Northern Flickers are found in woodlands, forests, and parks.

They nest in tree cavities, and the female lays between four and eight eggs. Northern Flickers are active during the day and are often seen feeding on the ground. When they fly, their wings make a loud whirring sound.

Cedar Waxwing

The Cedar Waxwing is a beautiful bird that can be found in Louisiana. They are easily identified by their red and yellow plumage, as well as their black mask. Cedar Waxwings are social birds and often travel in flocks.

They eat mainly insects, but will also consume fruits and berries. Cedar Waxwings are small birds, measuring only about six inches in length. They make their homes in forests and woodlands.

Cedar Waxwings are known for their playful behavior, often seen chasing each other around or playing with objects. They are also very curious birds and will often approach humans out of curiosity.

Indigo Bunting

The Indigo Bunting is a small songbird that is native to North America. The bird gets its name from the bright blue plumage of the male bird. The female bird has brown and gray plumage.

The Indigo Bunting typically measures between four and five inches in length. The bird has a short beak and long wings. The tail of the Indigo Bunting is forked.

The diet of the Indigo Bunting consists mostly of insects. The bird will also eat berries and other small fruits.

The habitat of the Indigo Bunting includes open woodlands, fields, and forest edges. The bird is also commonly found near bodies of water such as lakes and streams.

The Indigo Bunting is a shy bird that is typically seen alone or in pairs. The bird is not known to be aggressive and will typically flee if approached by a predator. The song of the Indigo Bunting has been described as being cheerful and musical.

Common Yellowthroat

(Geothlypis trichas)

The Common Yellowthroat is a small New World warbler. Adult males have olive-yellow upperparts, with darker wings and tail. Their throat and breast are bright yellow, and they have a black mask through their eyes. Females look similar but tend to have paler colors overall. These birds are about 13 cm long and weigh around 20g.

Their diet consists mainly of insects, which they glean from foliage or catch in mid-air. Common Yellowthroats typically nest in low shrubs or weeds, laying between three and six eggs at a time. Both parents help to incubate the eggs for about 12 days until they hatch. The young birds fledge about two weeks after hatching.

Common Yellowthroats are found throughout North and Central America, from Alaska to Panama. They prefer habitats with dense vegetation, such as woods edges, swamps, and wetlands. In the winter months, they can be found in southern parts of the United States, Mexico, and Central America.

Eastern Bluebird

(Sialia sialis) are one of the most beautiful birds in North America. They have a blue back, wings, and tail with an orange chest. The female typically has duller colors. They are small birds measuring about six inches long.

The Eastern Bluebird eats mostly insects but will also consume berries. You can find them in open woodlands, fields, and orchards. They build their nests in tree cavities or man-made nest boxes. The male will find a suitable nesting spot and then try to attract a mate by singing and showing off his vibrant colors.

Chipping Sparrow

Chipping Sparrows are small birds, measuring only about 15 cm in length. They have brown upperparts and grayish-brown underparts. The sides of their face are streaked with brown and they have a white line above their eyes. Their bill is black and slightly curved.

Chipping Sparrows eat mostly insects, but will also consume seeds and berries. They forage on the ground, often in open areas near trees or bushes.

These birds breed in North America, typically in the eastern and central parts of the continent. Their breeding habitat is open woodlands, farmlands, and suburban areas. Chipping Sparrows build nests made of grasses, leaves, and hair, which are usually hidden in trees or shrubs.

Brown-headed Cowbird

The Brown-headed Cowbird is a small blackbird with a dark brown head. Males and females look similar. These birds are found in open woodlands, fields, and edges throughout North America.

Brown-headed Cowbirds are parasitic birds. This means they lay their eggs in the nests of other bird species. The host bird then raises the young cowbird as its own. Brown-headed Cowbirds often eat more food than the host bird’s own chicks. This can cause the smaller host chicks to starve and die.

These birds are about seven and a half inches long with a wingspan of eleven to thirteen inches. They weigh between one ounce and one and a half ounces. Brown-headed Cowbirds eat mostly insects and seeds.

You can find Brown-headed Cowbirds in all of Louisiana except for the northwest corner, which is part of the Prairie region. These birds are year-round residents in our state. You’re most likely to see them from March through October, when they’re actively breeding.

Brown Thrasher

The Brown Thrasher is a medium-sized songbird with reddish brown upperparts and streaked, grayish brown underparts. It has a long rust-colored tail with white edges, and yellow eyes.

This thrasher is found in open woodlands, brushy areas, and gardens throughout the southeastern United States. It forages on the ground for insects, spiders, and other small invertebrates. The Brown Thrasher is the state bird of Georgia.

This thrasher is about nine and a half inches long with a wingspan of fourteen inches. It has a reddish brown back with grayish brown streaked underparts. The tail is long and rust-colored with white edges. The bill is black and curved. The eyes are yellow.

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

The yellow-bellied sapsucker is a medium-sized woodpecker with a black back, white breast, and yellow belly. They are also known to have a red throat and forehead. These birds can be found in the eastern half of North America where they prefer to live in deciduous or mixed forests.

When it comes to their diet, these sapsuckers eat mainly sap from trees but they will also consume insects. As for their size, yellow-bellied sapsuckers are about 16 to 20 cm in length with a wingspan of around 30 cm. Now let’s take a look at their habitat and behavior.

When it comes to their habitat, yellow-bellied sapsuckers prefer to live in deciduous or mixed forests. These birds can be found in the eastern half of North America. As for their behavior, yellow-bellied sapsuckers are known to be aggressive when it comes to defending their territory.

They will often attack other birds that come too close to their nesting area. These sapsuckers are also known to be rather vocal birds. They will often make a “pik” sound or a “sik-sik-sik” noise.

What birds are common in Louisiana?

There are many birds that are common in Louisiana. Some of these include the American crow, the Carolina wren, and the northern cardinal. These are just a few of the many different types of birds that can be found in Louisiana.

If you are interested in seeing all of the different types of birds that live in Louisiana, make sure to check out the Audubon Society of Louisiana. They are a great resource for information on all things related to birds in Louisiana.

What is the rarest bird in Louisiana?

The Louisiana bird list is comprised of 436 species, but the rarest is the ivory-billed woodpecker. This bird was thought to be extinct until a sighting in Arkansas in 2004.

There have been no confirmed sightings of the ivory-billed woodpecker in Louisiana since 1950, but there is still hope that this magnificent bird may one day be seen again in the Bayou State.

What is the biggest bird in Louisiana?

The biggest bird in Louisiana is the American pelican. These massive birds can weigh up to 15 pounds and have a wingspan of up to 12 feet. Pelicans are excellent swimmers and can dive down deep to catch fish.

They often live near bodies of water such as lakes, rivers, and coasts. In Louisiana, you can find pelicans near the Gulf of Mexico.

Pelicans are protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. This law makes it illegal to harm, hunt, or kill pelicans. If you see a pelican in Louisiana, be sure to give it plenty of space and admire it from a distance.

Do finches live in Louisiana?

Finches are found in a variety of habitats throughout the world, including Louisiana. In the United States, finches can be found in all states except Hawaii.

There are many different species of finches, and they come in a variety of colors and sizes. Some common finches that are found in Louisiana include the American goldfinch, the house finch, and the purple finch.

Finches are generally social birds that live in small flocks, and they can often be seen perching on branches or flying from place to place in search of food. While most finches eat seeds and insects, some species of finches also eat fruits and berries.

Bird Feeders

One of the best ways to attract birds to your backyard is by putting up a bird feeder. But with so many different types and styles of bird feeders on the market, it can be tough to know which one is right for you. Here are a few things to keep in mind when shopping for a bird feeder:

  • The type of birds you want to attract
  • The size of your backyard
  • Your budget

If you’re looking to attract a specific type of bird, like cardinals or bluebirds, be sure to choose a feeder that’s designed for that species. If you have a large backyard, you may want to consider getting a few different types of feeders to attract a variety of birds. And finally, don’t forget to factor in your budget when making your purchase.