Most Common Birds of New Jersey

Did you know that New Jersey is home to more than 375 different bird species? From the common blue jay to the elusive ivory-billed woodpecker, there is something for everyone when it comes to New Jersey’s birds. In this blog post, we will take a look at some of the most common birds found in the state. Whether you are a beginner or an experienced birder, we hope you will find this post helpful!

Common Backyard Birds of NJ:

Northern Cardinals

are one of the most easily identified birds in North America. They are well-known for their bright red plumage, which stands out starkly against the green of trees and bushes. Cardinals are relatively large songbirds, measuring about nine inches in length from beak to tail.

Cardinals are found in a variety of habitats throughout the eastern and central United States, including woodlands, gardens, and city parks.

They are year-round residents of their range, meaning that they do not migrate south for the winter like many other bird species. Cardinals are mostly seed eaters, although they will also consume insects on occasion.

One of the most interesting behaviors of cardinals is their mate-feeding behavior. Cardinals are monogamous birds, meaning that they mate for life. The male cardinal will often feed seeds to his mate as a way of showing affection. This behavior is thought to help maintain the pair bond between the two birds.

Red-winged Blackbird

(Agelaius phoeniceus) is a species of a true blackbird in the family Icteridae. The red-winged blackbird is sexually dimorphic, with the male being all black with a red shoulder and the female being dark brown.

The red-winged blackbird is found in marshes and wetlands throughout North America. It is a territorial bird, often seen perched on tree branches or fences. The red-winged blackbird is omnivorous and feeds on insects, spiders, snails, berries, and seeds.

The female red-winged blackbird builds a cup nest out of twigs, grasses, and leaves. She lays between three and five eggs, which are incubated for 12-14 days. The red-winged blackbird is a vocal bird and its song consists of a series of trills and whistles.

The red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) is a species of true blackbird in the family Icteridae. The red-winged blackbird is sexually dimorphic, with the male being all black with a red shoulder and the female being dark brown.

The red-winged blackbird is found in marshes and wetlands throughout North America. It is a territorial bird, often seen perched on tree branches or fences. The red-winged blackbird is omnivorous and feeds on insects, spiders, snails, berries, and seeds.

The female red-winged blackbird builds a cup nest out of twigs, grasses, and leaves. She lays between three and five eggs, which are incubated for 12-14 days. The red-winged blackbird is a vocal bird and its song consists of a series of trills and whistles.

White-throated Sparrow

White-throated Sparrows are common New Jersey birds. They have a white throat and breast with dark streaks, yellowish-brown upperparts, and a long tail. White-throated Sparrows eat insects, sunflower seeds, and berries. They are about five to six inches long with a wingspan of eight to ten inches.

White-throated Sparrows live in woodlands, gardens, and brushy areas. They build nests in trees or shrubs. White-throated Sparrows are active during the day. They sing a clear whistle that sounds like “old-sam-peabody-peabody-peabody.”

The white-throated sparrow is a songbird native to North America. It gets its name from the white throat patch which is a prominent feature on both male and female birds. The rest of the plumage is a mix of brown, gray, and yellowish-brown tones. These sparrows are typically around five or six inches in length with a wingspan of eight to ten inches.

White-throated sparrows are found in a variety of habitats including woodlands, gardens, and brushy areas. They build their nests in trees or shrubs, usually quite close to the ground. These birds are active during the day and sing a clear whistle that sounds like “old-sam-peabody-peabody-peabody.”

House Sparrow

House Sparrows are small birds with brown upperparts and gray underparts. They have a stout build, a short tail, and a large, rounded head. Their bill is short and thick, and their legs are short and black. Adult males have gray crowns and napes, while females and juveniles have brown crowns and napes.

House Sparrows are found in a variety of habitats, including urban and suburban areas. They typically eat insects and sunflower seeds. These birds are about six inches long and weigh one ounce.

House Sparrows are social birds that often form flocks. They are also known to be aggressive towards other bird species. House Sparrows sometimes build their nests in cavities in buildings. These birds are not migratory and can be found in New Jersey all year round.

House Finches

(Haemorhous mexicanus)

The House Finch is a small songbird with a stout build. The adult male has red on its head, breast, and back, with brown streaks on its sides. The female usually lacks the red and instead is streaked overall with brownish-black. Young birds are similar to females. Both sexes have brown wings and tails with white bars and brown streaks on the belly. The House Finch is about five inches long.

The House Finch is found in open woodlands, brushy areas, weedy fields, and suburban gardens across much of the United States. It has adapted well to human activity and often nests near houses.

The House Finch eats mostly sunflower seeds, but will also eat insects. You can attract them to your yard by putting out a bird feeder with sunflower or thistle seed.

These birds are often seen in pairs or small flocks feeding on the ground or in bushes. They may also be seen at backyard bird feeders. The House Finch is an important seed disperser for many native plants.

The House Finch is a relatively new bird to New Jersey, having only been seen in the state since the 1950s. It is not clear how this bird got its start in New Jersey, but it is now a common sight in the southern and central parts of the state. The House Finch is an important seed disperser for many native plants in New Jersey.

Song Sparrow

Song Sparrows are medium-sized sparrows with streaked brown upperparts and grayish underparts. Their breast and throat are pale with heavy dark streaks. They have a dark line through their eye and a long-notched tail.

Song Sparrows can be found in open woodlands, fields, marshes, and suburban areas. They build cup nests made of grasses, weeds, and twigs. The female lays three to five eggs which are incubated for 12-14 days.

Both parents feed the young birds who leave the nest after about two weeks. Song Sparrows eat mostly insects but will also eat sunflower seeds and berries. In the winter they often form flocks and can be seen in open areas searching for food.

Red-bellied Woodpecker

(Melanerpes carolinus)

The red-bellied woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker found in North America. Males have a red cap that extends from the forehead to the nape, while females have a red patch on the nape. The adult red-bellied woodpecker has a white belly with red sides. Juveniles have a brownish head and back with pale spotting.

The red-bellied woodpecker is found in forests and woodlands. It is a common bird in the eastern United States and Canada. The red-bellied woodpecker feeds on insects, fruits, and nuts. It often excavates holes in trees to find food.

The red-bellied woodpecker is about 16 cm (63 in) long with a wingspan of 28 cm (11 in). Males weigh 50 g (18 oz) and females 45 g (16 oz). The red-bellied woodpecker is the only North American woodpecker with a red belly.

The red-bellied woodpecker is a shy bird that is often seen alone or in pairs. It is a non-migratory bird that spends its entire life in the same area. The red-bellied woodpecker excavates holes in trees to make nests. It also uses these holes to store food for the winter.

Northern Flicker

(Colaptes auratus) – The Northern Flicker is a medium-sized bird with a length of approximately 11 to 14 inches. It has a brown back, black bars on its wings, and a red breast.

The male has a black mustache mark on its face, while the female does not. Its diet consists mainly of insects, but it will also eat fruits, berries, and nuts. The Northern Flicker is found in open woodlands, parks, and backyards across North America.

It is a non-migratory bird that is active during the day. The Northern Flicker is known for its loud ‘wick-a-wick-a-wick’ call. It is also known to hammer on wood to attract mates and to make nests.

Gray Catbird

(Dumetella carolinensis)

The Gray Catbird is a small songbird with gray plumage and a long tail. It is found in wooded areas across the eastern United States and southern Canada.

The Gray Catbird feeds on insects, berries, and fruits. It nests in trees or shrubs, usually near the ground. The Gray Catbird is not considered to be a threatened or endangered species.

The Gray Catbird is a small songbird with gray plumage and a long tail. It is found in wooded areas across the eastern United States and southern Canada.

The Gray Catbird feeds on insects, berries, and fruits. It nests in trees or shrubs, usually near the ground. The Gray Catbird is not considered to be a threatened or endangered species.

Carolina Wren

The Carolina wren is a small songbird with a long tail and rusty-brown plumage. It has a white eyebrow stripe and a black mask around its bright yellow eyes. This bird is found in the southeastern United States, where it is the state bird of South Carolina.

The Carolina wren feeds on insects, spiders, and other small invertebrates. It forages on the ground or in low vegetation, hopping along with its tail held upright.

This bird builds a nest of twigs and leaves in a protected location, such as a hollow tree or nest box. The Carolina wren is non-migratory and usually remains in its territory year-round.

Mourning Doves

Mourning Doves are a common sight in New Jersey. These plump, gray birds with long tails and black-tipped wings can be found in open habitats such as fields, meadows, and parks. Mourning Doves are ground feeders and eat mostly sunflower seeds.

They drink by sucking up water into their bill and then tilting their head back to let the water run down their throat. Mourning Doves are shy birds and will quickly fly away when disturbed.

These birds mate for life and build their nests in trees or shrubs. The female lays two white eggs per clutch. Both parents help care for the young.

Tufted Titmouse

Tufted Titmice are small birds with big personalities. They are easily identified by their gray bodies and white breast, as well as the black tuft of feathers on their heads. These spunky little birds are not afraid to stand up to larger birds, and will often be seen chasing away much larger birds from their territories.

Their diet consists mostly of insects and spiders, which they find by searching through the leaves of trees. They will also eat nuts and berries.

Tufted Titmice are small birds, only about six inches in length. Their habitat is mostly woodlands, where they nest in holes in trees.

These little birds are very active and are constantly on the move, looking for food. They are also very vocal birds, and their loud calls can often be heard in the woods.

American Crowd

American Crowders are large birds that can be found in the woods of New Jersey. These birds are known for their loud calls and their bright plumage. American Crowders typically eat insects, fruits, and nuts. They usually nest in trees or on cliffs. American Crowders are interesting birds to watch because of their behavior.

They are known to be curious and will often approach people. They are also known to be good at flying and will often soar in the sky.

European Starlings

European Starlings are small to medium-sized birds with glossy black feathers and yellow eyes. They are found in open woods and fields in New Jersey. Their diet consists of insects, fruits, and seeds. European Starlings are about the same size as a robin. They have long wings and short tails.

Their habitat is open woods and fields. European Starlings are social birds. They are often seen in flocks of 20 to 30 birds. They make a variety of sounds, including chirps, squeaks, and whistles. European Starlings are known for their nesting habits.

They build nests in trees, on buildings, and in the ground. European Starlings are considered an invasive species in New Jersey. They are a threat to native birds because they compete for food and nesting sites.

European Starlings are not protected in New Jersey. You can help control the population of European Starlings by removing their nests and eggs from your property.

Downy Woodpecker

(Picoides pubescens)

The Downy Woodpecker is the smallest woodpecker in North America, measuring just six to seven inches in length. Its back is black with white spots, its belly is white, and its head has a distinctive black-and-white striped pattern.

The Downy Woodpecker can be found in forests and woodlands across the United States and Canada. It feeds on insects, larvae, and spiders, which it finds by pecking at tree bark.

The Downy Woodpecker is a common backyard bird that often visits bird feeders. It is a friendly bird that is not afraid to approach humans. Downys are known to mate for life and often nest in tree cavities.

American Robin

(Turdus migratorius) is a medium sized songbird with a strong, slightly curved bill. They are mostly gray-brown above and pale below, with a black head and white throat.

The juvenile robin has browner upperparts and is paler overall. Robins are found in woods, gardens, farmland, and parks throughout North America. They are very adaptable and will even nest in urban areas.

Robins eat a variety of invertebrates, including earthworms, insects, and snails. They also eat fruits and berries. During the winter, robins will often congregate in large flocks to forage for food. Robins are active birds and are constantly on the move.

They are also known for their beautiful song. If you hear a robin singing in the spring, it is most likely a male bird trying to attract a mate. Robins are not shy birds and will often approach humans. This makes them one of the easiest backyard birds to spot!

Blue Jay

The Blue Jay is a striking bird with blue upperparts and white underparts. It has a black neck and head, with a white “collar” around its throat. It also has a crest on its head, which it can raise or lower. Blue Jays are found in woods and forests across North America. They are social birds, often seen in pairs or small groups. Blue Jays are known for their loud, harsh calls.

They also make a softer “purring” sound. Blue Jays eat mostly insects and nuts. They will also take eggs and nestlings from other birds’ nests. Blue Jays are about the size of a crow. They have long tails and short, stout legs. Blue Jays can fly up to 60 miles per hour!

Blue Jays are found in woods and forests across North America. They prefer areas with lots of trees, but they can also be found in urban areas. Blue Jays are very active birds.

They are constantly moving around, flying from place to place, and looking for food. Blue Jays are known for their loud, harsh calls. They also make a softer “purring” sound. Blue Jays are very curious birds.

They often come close to people, even landing on them! Blue Jays are shy around other animals, though. When they see a cat or dog, they will usually fly away. Blue Jays are about the size of a crow.

Common Grackle

The Common Grackle is a large blackbird with a long tail and shiny black plumage. The males have yellow eyes, while the females have brown eyes. These birds are found in open woodlands, fields, and marshes.

They prefer to nest in trees near water. Their diet consists of insects, earthworms, berries, and seeds. Grackles are known to be aggressive and will often chase away other birds from their territory.

These birds are also known to make a variety of sounds, including a loud, harsh “cackle.” Common Grackles are generally about 12 inches in length. They can be found throughout North America.

American Goldfinch

The American Goldfinch, also called the Eastern Goldfinch or simply the “Goldie”, is a small North American bird in the finch family. It is migratory, moving south in winter. Male and female goldfinches are very similar in appearance, with only slight differences in size and coloration.

The adult male has a yellow head and body with black wings, tail, and cap. The adult female is paler overall, with a dull olive-brown back and wingtips. Both sexes have white patches on their outermost primaries (flight feathers). Juveniles are similar to females, but have a brown streaked back.

The American Goldfinch is a small bird, measuring about 12-15 cm in length and weighing only 15-20 grams. Its wingspan is 20-25 cm. The Goldfinch has a very characteristic conical bill, which is used to feed on seeds from thistle heads and other sources.

The American Goldfinch breeds across much of North America, from Alaska and Canada to the Gulf States. In winter, it can be found as far south as Panama. The Goldfinch typically inhabits open areas with scattered trees, such as fields, meadows, and farmland.

Eastern Kingbird – Tyrannus

The Eastern Kingbird is a medium-sized flycatcher with a large head and bill. They are dark grayish-brown on their upperparts and paler gray wings on their underparts. Their tail is long and black with white tips. Adults have a white wing bar. Juveniles are similar to adults but have brown wings.

The Eastern Kingbird breeds in open habitats across eastern North America. Their diet consists of insects which they capture in mid-air. They typically nest in trees or shrubs, laying three to five eggs.

Kingbirds are aggressive and will defend their territories from other birds, even much larger ones such as hawks and crows. They have even been known to attack humans who come too close to their nests.

The Eastern Kingbird is a fairly common bird in New Jersey. Look for them in open habitats such as fields, parks, and roadsides.

Tree Swallow – Tachycineta bicolor

The Tree Swallow is a small, sleek bird with iridescent blue-green upperparts and white underparts. The wings are long and pointed, and the tail is forked. The bill is black and the legs are short.

Adult males have a dark blue throat, while females have a light gray throat. Juveniles resemble adults but have browner upperparts and duller throats.

This insectivorous bird nests in tree cavities, often using man-made nest boxes. It forages in open areas, typically flying low over the ground or water to catch insects in flight. The Tree Swallow is a social bird, forming large flocks during migration and winter.

The Tree Swallow is found in open habitats across North America. In the breeding season, it occurs in forests, farmlands, and marshes. During migration and winter, it can be found in a variety of open habitats, including coastal areas.

The Tree Swallow is a relatively sedentary bird, with most individuals remaining within a few kilometers of their birthplace. Some birds do undertake long-distance migrations, however. The Tree Swallow is one of the earliest migrating songbirds in North America, with some birds beginning their journey south as early as July.

Barn Swallow – Hirundo rustica

The barn swallow is a small songbird with distinctive long, pointed wings. They are usually blue-black above and rusty-brown below with a forked tail. The female may have less reddish coloration than the male.

Juveniles are similar to adults but with more brown on their upperparts. These birds can be found near open fields and marshes and often build their mud nests on barns or other man-made structures.

The diet of the barn swallow consists mostly of insects which they catch in mid-flight. They will also eat berries and other fruits.

The average size of a barn swallow is about five to six inches long with a wingspan of around ten inches.

The preferred habitat of the barn swallow is open country with some trees or shrubs nearby. They will also nest near water.

Behaviorally, the barn swallow is a very social bird. They are often seen in large flocks and can be quite vocal. Breeding pairs will mate for life and often return to the same nesting site each year. These birds are also known to migrate long distances, sometimes traveling as far as South America.

Northern mockingbirds

Mockingbirds are about the size of a robin. They are grayish-brown above and pale below, with white bars on the wings. The tail is long and has white outer feathers that are often raised in a fan-like display. males and females look alike.

Mockingbirds eat mostly insects but will also consume fruits and berries. You may see them hopping along the ground looking for food or flying up to catch insects in midair. They also sometimes eat flower petals and grass.

Mockingbirds are found in open habitats such as fields, parks, and yards. They are not afraid of humans and will often build their nests close to homes. Mockingbirds are known for their singing ability. They sing a variety of songs that can last up to six minutes.

Dark-eyed Junco

The Dark-eyed Junco is a small sparrow with a slate-colored back and wings. They have white bellies and pinkish brown breasts. Their tails are long and pointed. Adult Juncos are about five to six inches in length.

The Dark-eyed Junco is found in woodlands, forests, and mountain areas. They prefer areas with thick vegetation. In the winter, they can be found in open fields and backyards.

The Dark-eyed Junco eats insects, seeds, and berries. In the summer, they eat mostly insects. In the winter, they eat mostly seeds.

The Dark-eyed Junco is a shy bird that is often seen alone or in small groups. They are not very vocal birds. The male Junco will sing a short song during mating season.

Eastern Bluebird

(Sialia sialis) is a small thrush found in open woodlands, farmlands, and orchards. This robin-sized bird has blue upperparts, rusty-red underparts, and a white belly. It has a black cap and throat and yellow eyes. The bill is black with a yellow base. The adult male has a solid blue head and throat.

The adult female usually has a blue head and rusty-red throat. Both sexes have reddish brown on the wings and tail. Juveniles are similar to adults but have paler upperparts, duller underparts, and no black cap or throat.

The Eastern Bluebird is found in the eastern half of the United States and southeastern Canada. It is a non-migratory bird that will move to new areas if its habitat becomes unsuitable.

This bird prefers open woodlands, farmlands, and orchards with scattered trees. It also needs access to ground level nesting sites such as old stumps, fence posts, or nest boxes.

Chipping Sparrow

Chipping Sparrows are small birds with brown upperparts and gray underparts. They have a streaked cap, a white face, and a long, thin bill. Chipping Sparrows eat insects and seeds. They nest in trees or shrubs, often near the ground. Chipping Sparrows are found in open woods and fields throughout North America.

These sparrows are active and vocal birds. The Chipping Sparrow’s song is a series of trills, chips, and buzzes. These sparrows are commonly seen in residential areas and parks.

The Chipping Sparrow is a small bird, measuring only about five inches in length. This sparrow has brown upperparts and gray underparts, with a streaked cap and white face. The Chipping Sparrow has a long, thin bill that is well-suited for picking insects out of the air.

Carolina Chickadee – Poecile carolinensis

The Carolina Chickadee is a small songbird with a black cap and bib with white sides to its face. Its back and wings are gray, and its underside is pale. This bird has a relatively long tail that is often held upright. It measures approximately four to five inches in length with a wingspan of six to seven inches.

The Carolina Chickadee typically eat insects and spiders, although they will also consume berries and other plant matter. They forage in trees and shrubs, often hanging upside down to reach their food.

This bird is found in woodlands throughout the eastern United States. It nests in tree cavities or nest boxes, and will often use the same nesting site year after year.

The Carolina Chickadee is an active bird, and is often seen flitting about in search of food. It is also known for its loud, distinctive call which sounds like “chick-a-dee-dee-dee”. This bird can often be seen in residential areas, and is a popular backyard bird.

What birds are common in NJ?

There are many different types of birds that can be found in New Jersey. Some of the more common species include American robins, blue jays, cardinals, and chickadees. There are also a variety of songbirds, waterfowl, and raptors that can be seen in the state.

NJ is a great place for birdwatching, as there is a wide variety of habitats to explore. Whether you’re in the woods, at the beach, or in your own backyard, you’re sure to see some amazing birds!

What’s the most common bird in New Jersey?

The most common bird in New Jersey is the American robin. Robins are found in woodlands, fields, and backyards throughout the state.

What is the rarest bird in NJ?

The rarest bird in NJ is the red-cockaded woodpecker. This bird is so rare that it is listed as endangered by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The red-cockaded woodpecker gets its name from the two red stripes on its head, which are called cockades.

How many species of birds are there in New Jersey?

There are over 375 species of birds that have been recorded in New Jersey. This number is constantly changing as new species are being found and some species are disappearing.

The bird population in New Jersey is very diverse and includes many different types of birds such as warblers, sparrows, hawks, and eagles.

How do you find out what bird I saw?

The best way to start is by looking at the bird’s physical characteristics. Try to identify the bird by its size, shape, color, and patterns. If you’re still not sure, look for clues in its habitat and behavior. For example, does it live in trees or on the ground? Is it a waterbird?

Does it eat insects or seeds? Once you’ve narrowed down your options, you can look for more specific identification marks like the shape of the beak or tail. With a little patience and observation, you should be able to figure out which bird you saw.

Bird Feeders

If you’re a bird lover, you may want to consider investing in a bird feeder. Bird feeders come in all shapes and sizes, so you can choose one that best suits your needs. You can also find bird feeders that cater to specific types of birds.

For example, if you live in an area with a lot of hummingbirds, you may want to buy a feeder that’s specifically designed for them.

When buying a bird feeder, it’s important to keep in mind the type of birds that you want to attract. You’ll also want to think about the size of the feeder and where you’re going to place it.

If you have a small yard, you may want to buy a smaller feeder. But if you have a large yard, you may want to buy a larger feeder so that more birds can enjoy it.

No matter what type of bird feeder you choose, be sure to clean it regularly. Dirty bird feeders can spread disease, so it’s important to keep them clean.

You should also empty the feeder and refill it with fresh bird seed every few days. By following these simple tips, you can enjoy watching birds in your own backyard!