Most Common Birds of North Carolina

North Carolina is a diverse state with many different habitats, making it a haven for bird species. Some of the most common birds found in the state include American robins, northern cardinals, mourning doves, blue jays, and red-winged blackbirds.

The data in this guide was gathered from trustworthy sources and crosschecked by an Ornithologist, ensuring its accuracy. We’ve also included pictures of the most commonly seen birds in North Carolina.

Common Backyard Birds in North Carolina

Eastern Towhee

Eastern Towhee

Eastern Towhee birds can be identified by their black bodies and white belly, with a red patch on their heads. They mainly eat insects and berries found in the underbrush of forests and thickets.

Eastern Towhees are about nine to eleven inches in size. In North Carolina, they can typically be found in deciduous or mixed woodlands.

These birds are ground foragers, often seen scratching at the leaves to find food. They are also known for their loud and distinctive songs. Eastern Towhees are usually solitary or found in pairs, but can sometimes be seen in small flocks during wintertime.

Northern mockingbirds

Northern mockingbirds

Northern mockingbirds, identified by their gray feathers and white wing patches, have a diet consisting mainly of insects and fruits.

They can reach up to 11 inches in length and have been known to inhabit gardens, shrublands, and open woodlands. These birds are known for their vocal abilities and will mimic the sounds of other birds and even electronic devices.

They also exhibit territorial behavior and will aggressively defend their territory against intruders. Northern mockingbirds can be commonly found in North Carolina during the spring and summer months.

Dark-eyed Junco

Dark-Eyed Junco

Dark eyed Juncos are small songbirds commonly found in North Carolina. It has a gray body with white outer tail feathers and a dark hood on its head. Its diet consists of black oil sunflower seeds, insects, and berries. Juncos typically inhabit coniferous or mixed wood forests, but can also be found in backyard bird feeders.

Their behavior includes foraging on the ground and quick, bouncy flight. They also have a distinctive, trilling song. The Dark-eyed Junco is a common winter visitor to North Carolina but some may stay year-round in higher elevation areas.

Other identifying characteristics of the Dark-eyed Junco include pinkish legs and bill, and white or light brown patches on the wings.

There are several color variations of the Dark-eyed Junco, including the Slate-colored, Oregon, Pink-sided, and White-winged forms. These variations can sometimes be found in North Carolina during winter months.

White-throated Sparrow

White-throated Sparrow

White-throated Sparrows can be identified by their white throat, yellow spot above the eye, and striped head. They primarily eat seeds and insects. These sparrows typically measure around six inches in length. In North Carolina, they can be found in deciduous woods and brushy areas.

White-throated Sparrows are known for their playful behavior, often engaging in hopping and wing-flicking. They can also be heard singing a distinctive two-note song.

It is important to protect the habitats of White-throated Sparrows, as well as all bird species, for the health and balance of our ecosystems. By providing bird feeder and planting native plants, we can support and attract these beautiful creatures to our outdoor spaces.

White-throated Sparrow range map

Eastern Bluebird

Eastern Bluebird

The Eastern Bluebird, the state bird of North Carolina, can be identified by its bright blue upper parts and reddish-brown breast. These birds mainly eat insects and berries. They typically have a length of 6 to 7 inches and can be found in open woodlands, fields, or suburban areas with trees and shrubs for nesting.

Bluebirds are known for their territorial behavior and will often chase away other bird species from their territory. They also engage in courtship rituals, such as flying high and then diving back toward their mate. This behavior is known as “threat displays” and often includes vocalizations. Bluebirds typically build their nests in tree cavities or nesting boxes provided by humans.

These birds form monogamous pairs and the female will lay a clutch of 4 to 5 eggs, which are incubated for 12 to 14 days before hatching. Both parents participate in feeding and caring for the young until they fledge at about 21 days old.

Eastern Bluebird range map

Northern Cardinals

Northern Cardinals

Northern Cardinals, also known as redbirds, can be identified by their bright red plumage and prominent crest. They primarily eat seeds and insects, but will also feed on fruits and berries. Male cardinals average 9 inches in length, while females tend to be slightly smaller at 7 inches.

In North Carolina, cardinals can be found in wooded areas, gardens, and backyard bird feeders. They often stay low to the ground while foraging, but will also perch in shrubs and trees.

Cardinals are monogamous and territorial birds, typically seen in pairs during the breeding season. They are known for their distinctive “cheer-cheer-cheer” call and frequent singing during dawn and dusk.

House Finch

House Finch

(Haemorhous mexicanus) can be identified by their red heads and chests, brown backs, and white belly. They primarily eat seeds and grains, but also consume insects, fruits, and berries. The average size of a House Finch is about 5-6 inches in length with a wingspan of 8-9 inches.

They can be found in a variety of habitats including urban areas, forest edges, and open woodlands.

In terms of behavior, these birds are typically seen in small flocks and have a song consisting of simple chirps and trills. They nest in tree cavities or on ledges and will defend their territory fiercely against intruders.

In North Carolina, House Finches can be seen year-round and are common backyard visitors, often visiting bird feeders to supplement their diet.

House Finch range map

American Goldfinch

American Goldfinch

American Goldfinch, also known as the Eastern Goldfinch, is a small, vibrant bird with a bright yellow body and black wings and tail. Their diet consists mainly of seeds and insects.

In North Carolina, they can be found in open woodlands and fields during the breeding season. During winter, they can often be seen flocking with other finches at feeders or in open habitats with abundant food sources.

During the breeding season, male goldfinches perform aerial maneuvers to attract a mate, including flying high and then letting themselves plummet toward the ground before catching themselves at the last second.

They build their nests from plant fibers and line them with soft materials such as thistle down. Both parents work together to incubate eggs and care for the young until they are able to fly on their own.

The average size of an American Goldfinch is 4-5 inches in length with a wingspan of 7-9 inches. They can live up to 10 years in the wild.

American Goldfinch range map

Carolina Chickadee

Carolina Chickadee

Carolina Chickadee, a small black and white bird, is one of the most common birds in North Carolina. They can be identified by their black cap and bib, white cheeks, and gray back.

Their diet consists mainly of insects, seeds, and nuts. They have been known to visit backyard feeders for sunflower seeds or suet.

The Carolina Chickadee usually measures 4-5 inches in length with a wingspan of 7-9 inches.

These birds can be found in a variety of habitats, including deciduous and coniferous forests, suburban areas, and even city parks.

In the winter, Carolina Chickadees form small flocks and forage for food together. They have a quiet but distinctive call, often heard as “chick-a-dee-dee-dee.” They are also known for their clever ability to hide food by storing it in tree crevices or other small hiding places for later consumption.

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler, also commonly known as “Butterbutt,” can be identified by their yellow patch on their rump and streaked gray chests. These birds feed mainly on insects, berries, and seeds, often foraging in dense shrubs or trees.

They typically measure around 5-6 inches in length and can be found in a variety of habitats such as coniferous forests, deciduous forests, and even urban areas.

During the breeding season, male Yellow-rumped Warblers display aggressive behavior to defend their territory and attract mates. They are also known for their distinctive songs and calls.

In North Carolina, these birds can be commonly seen during migration as well as by year-round residents in the western mountains. In the winter, they often flock with other species such as Cedar Waxwings and American Robins to feed on berries.

Yellow-rumped Warbler range map

Tufted Titmouse

tufted titmouse

Tufted Titmouse is a small gray and white songbird with a prominent black forehead, large round head, and short slender bill.

It can often be found in wooded areas or backyard gardens where it feeds on insects, seeds, berries, and nuts. These North Carolina birds typically nest in tree cavities but will also use birdhouses.

These social birds are often seen in small flocks and have a loud, metallic “peter-peter-peter” call. They are year-round residents in the state and do not migrate. On average, they measure around 5 to 6 inches in length with a wingspan of 7 to 9 inches.

Downy Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker is a small bird with black and white feathers, a white belly, and a black bill. They typically have a distinctive white patch on their backs.

In North Carolina, Downy Woodpeckers mainly eat insects, nuts, and berries. They also sometimes feed on sap from trees by pecking holes in the bark.

These birds are about 6-7 inches in length and have a wingspan of 9-10 inches.

Downy Woodpeckers can be found in wooded areas, parks, and backyard bird feeders. They often cling to tree trunks while foraging for food.

In terms of behavior, Downy Woodpeckers are known for their characteristic drumming on tree trunks using their strong bills. They also sometimes engage in aerial acrobatics, such as spinning and somersaulting in flight.

Downy Woodpeckers form monogamous pairs during breeding season and often nest in cavities excavated by the male. They also sometimes use old nests of other bird species or natural tree cavities. These birds may be seen in small flocks during the winter months.

Indigo Bunting

Indigo Bunting

Indigo Bunting is a small, bright blue bird commonly found in open woodlands and fields throughout North Carolina. They have white underbellies and black wings with white wingbars. Their diet consists mainly of insects and seeds.

In the summer months, males can often be seen singing from high perches or performing elaborate flight displays to attract mates. During the winter, they form small flocks and forage together on the ground.

In terms of size, indigo buntings typically measure around 4-5 inches in length with a wingspan of 7-9 inches. Their habitat preferences can vary, but they are commonly found in open woodland areas with dense shrubs or thickets for nesting.

American Robin

American Robin

(Turdus migratorius) is a common sight in North Carolina, with its distinct reddish-orange breast and black head. These birds primarily eat insects and fruits, but will also feed on earthworms and snails.

They are about 11-12 inches in length and can be found in both urban and rural habitats, from backyard gardens to forests.

American Robins are social birds, typically found in groups or flocks, and are known for their characteristic “cheer-up, cheerily, cheer up, cheer up” song. They build cup-shaped nests made of grass and mud, often seen high in trees or on building ledges.

These birds can also be spotted on the ground, as they frequently forage for food by digging and flipping over leaves with their strong beaks. During winter months, American Robins may form large flocks and migrate to warmer areas.

American Robin range map

Ruby Throated Hummingbird

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Ruby Throated Hummingbird is the only hummingbird that commonly nests in North Carolina. They have iridescent green backs and ruby red throats, with white underbellies and forked tails.

These birds mainly feed on nectar from flowers, but also eat small insects for protein. They are very small, typically only measuring 3-3.5 inches in length.

Ruby Throated Hummingbirds can be found in a variety of habitats, including gardens, woodlands, and open meadows. They are known for their unique flying abilities, as they are able to fly forwards, backwards, and hover in place. They also have the ability to migrate long distances, traveling up to 500 miles in one day.

During mating season, males perform elaborate aerial displays to attract a mate. They also defend their territory aggressively against other hummingbirds. These territorial behaviors can sometimes be seen at backyard feeders, where multiple hummingbirds may fight for access to the food source.

Ruby-throated Hummingbird range map

Carolina Wren

Carolina Wren

Carolina Wrens, found in North Carolina, have a distinctive rusty-brown color on their upper feathers and a white belly. They have a long black tail that often cocks up at the end, giving them a perky appearance. Their diet consists primarily of insects and berries.

These tiny birds typically measure around 4 to 5 inches in length. They can be found in a variety of habitats, including forests, gardens, and even urban areas.

Carolina Wrens are known for their loud and energetic songs. They also have a habit of carrying sticks and other materials to add to their nests, which they construct in cavities or sheltered areas such as tree hollows or birdhouses. These are non-migratory birds and often form long-term pair bonds.

Mourning Doves

Mourning Doves

Mourning Doves are easily identified by their soft gray and brown plumage, long slender tail, and small black spot on their neck. They primarily feed on seeds from plants and grains but will also eat insects for protein.

The average size of a Mourning Dove is 12 inches in length with a wingspan of 18 inches. These birds can be found throughout North Carolina in open woodlands, fields, and suburban areas.

They primarily nest on the ground in a well-concealed location near trees or buildings.

Mourning Doves are most active during dawn and dusk, however they can also be seen foraging for food during the day. These birds have a distinct call consisting of loud coos that increase in volume and speed.

They often form monogamous pairs during breeding season and both parents will help raise their young. Mourning Doves are also known for their quick flight, which can reach speeds up to 55 miles per hour.

Blue Jays

Blue Jays

Blue Jays are easily recognizable by their bright blue feathers and black crest on top of their head. They are also known for their loud and distinct calls.

In terms of diet, Blue Jays primarily feed on nuts and seeds, but they have been known to eat insects, fruits, and even smaller birds.

Blue Jays typically range in size from 9 to 12 inches in length and have a wingspan of 13 to 17 inches.

In North Carolina, Blue Jays can be found in forests and residential areas with trees.

In terms of behavior, Blue Jays are known for their intelligence and problem-solving abilities. They also have the ability to mimic the calls of other birds. Additionally, they have a tendency to hide and store food for later consumption.

Blue Jays are also known for their aggressive nature, particularly when defending their territory or feeding sources. They have been known to aggressively chase away smaller birds from bird feeders.

Wood Thrush – Hylocichla mustelina

Wood Thrush

The Wood Thrush is a medium-sized bird, about 9-11 inches in length with brown upperparts and heavily spotted underparts. Its most distinguishing feature is its chestnut-brown colored throat.

In North Carolina, the Wood Thrush can be found in deciduous forests and woodlands, where it primarily feeds on insects and berries.

During the breeding season, the male Wood Thrush can often be heard singing its melodic song, a series of flute-like phrases. The female builds a cup-shaped nest on the ground or low in a tree and typically lays 3-4 eggs. Both parents take turns incubating the eggs and feeding the young.

In the winter, Wood Thrushes migrate to Central and South America, where they can be found in subtropical and tropical forests.

Wood Thrush range map

Song Sparrow – Melospiza melodia

Song Sparrow

The Song Sparrow can be identified by its brown streaked upperparts and buff underparts, with a noticeable dark spot on the breast. They have a long rounded tail and a distinct facial marking, with a dark stripe through the eye and a thin stripe above.

Their diet consists mainly of insects and seeds, foraging on the ground or low in vegetation.

Song Sparrows range in size from 5.5 to 6.7 inches in length and have a wingspan of 8.7 to 10.6 inches.

These birds can be found in a variety of habitats, including marshes, fields, shrublands, and residential areas. They are common throughout North Carolina and can be seen year-round in the state.

Song Sparrows are often found alone or in pairs, but may gather in small flocks during migration and winter. They have a loud, varied song consisting of trills, whistles, and buzzes. These singing behaviors peak during the breeding season as they establish territories and attract mates.

They build cup-shaped nests on or close to the ground, and both the male and female take part in incubating the eggs and feeding the young.

Eastern Phoebe – Sayornis phoebe

Eastern Phoebe

In North Carolina, the Eastern Phoebe can typically be identified by its gray-brown upperparts and pale underparts, with a darker tail and wings. It also has a white eye ring and dark bill.

During the breeding season, the Eastern Phoebe primarily feeds on insects such as flies, beetles, and caterpillars. They may also eat some berries and seeds.

Eastern Phoebes are small birds, measuring around 5-6 inches in length with a wingspan of 8-10 inches.

They can typically be found near open woodlands, fields, and other habitats with low vegetation. They often build their nests on man-made structures such as buildings, bridges, and fences.

During the breeding season, Eastern Phoebes can be seen making short sallies from a perch to catch insects in midair. They may also fly low over the ground to catch prey. Outside of the breeding season, they often forage in small flocks with other insect-eating birds.

The male Eastern Phoebe will perform an aerial display during courtship, diving and then rising with deep wing beats. They may also bring food to the female as a way of courting her. Both sexes help build the nest and care for the young.

American Crow

American Crow

(Corvus brachyrhynchos) can be identified by their all-black plumage, stout bills, and fan-shaped tails. They have a diverse diet including insects, fruits, nuts, garbage, and small animals. They are typically about 17-21 inches in length with a wingspan of 33-40 inches.

American Crows can be found in a variety of habitats, including forests, fields, and urban areas. They are highly intelligent birds and have been observed using tools, problem solving, and even holding funerals for their fallen comrades.

In North Carolina, American Crows can be commonly seen throughout the year with peak numbers during fall migration. However, their populations have been decreasing in recent years due to West Nile Virus and other threats.

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker can be identified by their red crown and nape, white cheeks, black and white striped back, and barred wings and tail. They primarily eat insects, nuts, fruits, and sap from trees. Their average size ranges from 9 to 12 inches in length.

In North Carolina, they can commonly be found in deciduous or mixed woodlands, residential areas with mature trees, orchards, and parks.

Their behavior includes using their strong bill to drill holes in tree trunks to extract food and nest, climbing up and down tree trunks “head first”, and storing excess food for later consumption. They are also known for their loud call that sounds similar to a “jackhammer”.

Red-bellied Woodpecker range map

Pileated Woodpecker – Dryocopus pileatus

pileated woodpeckers

In North Carolina, the Pileated Woodpecker can be identified by its black body with white stripes on the wings and a red crest on its head.

This bird primarily feeds on insects and their larvae, nuts, and fruit found in wooded areas. They are one of the largest woodpeckers in North America, measuring up to 19 inches in length.

Pileated Woodpeckers prefer mature forests with large trees for nesting and foraging. They create nests by excavating holes in dead or dying trees, and may even use these cavities for roosting at night.

In addition to their loud drumming on tree trunks to communicate and find food, Pileated Woodpeckers also use their strong beaks to strip bark from trees in search of insects.

These birds play an important role in forest ecosystems by helping to control insect populations and create nesting cavities for other species.

However, habitat loss and fragmentation can impact their populations. Conservation efforts such as protecting mature forests and managing dead and dying trees can help support Pileated Woodpeckers and other wildlife.

Pileated Woodpecker range map

Eastern Screech Owl – Megascops asios

eastern screech owl

The Eastern Screech Owl is a small owl, measuring approximately 6-10 inches in length with a wingspan of 18-24 inches. It has distinctive ear tufts and coloration that can vary between gray or red morphs.

In North Carolina, the Eastern Screech Owl can be found inhabiting deciduous or mixed forests and urban areas with mature trees.

Their diet consists primarily of small mammals, insects, and other birds. They hunt by perching on a branch and waiting to spot prey, or by flying low over open areas to capture food on the ground.

During the day, Eastern Screech Owls are typically inactive and roost in tree cavities or nest boxes. At night, they can often be heard calling with their signature trilling sound. They are also known for their ability to camouflage themselves by flattening their bodies against tree bark.

In North Carolina, Eastern Screech Owls typically breed from February to May and may have up to five eggs per clutch. The female incubates the eggs for about a month before they hatch, with both parents participating in caring for and feeding the young owls until they are ready to leave the nest at six to seven weeks old.

Eastern Screech-Owl range map

Red-winged Blackbird

Red-winged Blackbird

(Agelaius phoeniceus) can be identified by their black body and red shoulder patches, or “epaulets.” Their diet consists mainly of insects, seeds, and grains. They typically measure around 9-11 inches in length.

In North Carolina, this species can be found in marshes, meadows, fields, and other wetland areas.

Red-winged Blackbirds are highly social, often seen in large flocks and forming colonies for nesting. They are also known for their loud, distinctive calls. Males display their red shoulder patches during courtship displays, diving and swooping over potential mates.

When threatened or defending their territory, they may engage in aerial “dive bombing” towards the perceived threat. This species is also known to sometimes use abandoned nests of other bird species for their own nesting purposes.

House Sparrow

House Sparrow

House Sparrows, also known as English Sparrows, can be easily identified by their stocky build and gray-brown plumage with black markings on the head and chest. They are commonly found near human habitation, where they feed on seeds, grains, and insects. These birds typically measure about 6 inches in length and have a wingspan of 8-9 inches.

In North Carolina, House Sparrows can be found in urban and suburban areas, particularly near sources of food such as bird feeders or agricultural fields. They are often seen in large flocks and can be quite noisy and aggressive towards other birds at feeding sites.

In the breeding season, male House Sparrows will puff up their chest feathers and chirp to attract a mate. They build their nests in sheltered areas such as tree cavities or the eaves of buildings.

Despite their close association with humans, House Sparrow populations have been declining in recent years due to loss of habitat and competition for food from other introduced bird species. However, they are still common and can be easily spotted in North Carolina cities and towns.

House Sparrow range map

Common Grackle

Common Grackle

(Quiscalus quiscula) can be identified by their glossy purple-black feathers and long, pointed tails.

They mainly eat insects, seeds, and grains. In North Carolina, they can range in size from 11 to 13 inches in length. Grackles typically inhabit open areas such as fields or parks where there are trees for nesting and plenty of food sources.

These birds are known to be noisy and aggressive, especially during breeding season when they will defend their territory. They also have a habit of gathering in large flocks outside of the breeding season.

Common Grackle range map

Brown Headed Nuthatch

Brown-headed-Nuthatch

Brown Headed Nuthatch is a small bird, measuring only about 4 inches in length. They have a distinct brown head and gray body with white underparts. Their diet consists mainly of insects, nuts, and seeds.

In North Carolina, Brown Headed Nuthatches can be found in pine forests and woodlands. They are often seen clinging upside down on tree trunks while foraging for food.

These birds are also known for their nesting habits, as they will often use a previous hole or cavity in a tree made by woodpeckers to build their nests.

They will also join with other small birds such as chickadees and titmice in cooperative breeding groups, where all individuals help to raise the young.

White-breasted Nuthatch

White-breasted Nuthatch

White-breasted Nuthatch is a small bird with gray upperparts and white underparts. They have a black cap and white face, with a long, pointed bill.

Their diet consists mostly of insects and seeds found in trees.

They can range in size from 4-5 inches in length, with a wingspan of 7-9 inches.

They can be found in deciduous and coniferous forests, as well as suburban areas with large trees.

Their behavior includes climbing up and down tree trunks in search of food, and storing excess food for later consumption. They also have a distinct call, described as a “yank-yank” sound.

In North Carolina, they can be commonly found in the western and central regions of the state during breeding season. They may also appear in the eastern region during winter months.

White-breasted Nuthatch range map

Carolina Wren

Carolina Wren

Carolina Wrens, found in North Carolina, have a distinct brown and white striped appearance and are known for their loud singing. Their diet consists primarily of insects, but they will also eat berries and seeds. They typically measure around 4 to 5 inches in length and can be found in various habitats including forests, parks, gardens, and even urban areas.

Carolina Wrens are known for their curious and energetic behavior, often seen flitting from branch to branch in search of food. They also build dome-shaped nests made of sticks and other materials, typically located low to the ground in shrubs or tree cavities.

Additionally, Carolina Wrens are known for their remarkable ability to adapt and survive in a variety of environments, making them a common sight across North Carolina.

Black-eyed Junco – Junco hyemalis

Dark-Eyed Junco

In North Carolina, the Black-eyed Junco can be identified by its slate gray body and black head with a distinct white eye ring. This bird primarily eats seeds and insects. It measures about 6 inches in length and can be found in coniferous or mixed forest habitats.

The Black-eyed Junco is known for its timid behavior and tendency to forage on the ground rather than in trees.It is also a frequent visitor to bird feeders. In the winter, flocks of these birds can often be seen in open fields or residential areas.

During mating season, male Black-eyed Juncos perform elaborate courtship displays, including hopping, wing flicking, and singing. They build cup-shaped nests in trees or shrubs and typically lay 4-5 eggs per clutch. Both parents take part in incubating the eggs and caring for the young until they are ready to leave the nest.

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker – Sphyrapicus varius

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

In North Carolina, the Yellow-bellied Sapsucker can be identified by its black and white striped back, red crown, and yellow lower belly. This bird primarily feeds on tree sap and insects but also eats berries and fruit.

On average, the Yellow-bellied Sapsucker measures 7 to 8 inches in length with a wingspan of 13 to 15 inches. They can be found in deciduous and mixed woodlands, often near water sources.

In terms of behavior, the Yellow-bellied Sapsucker will create rows of holes in trees to access sap and attract insects. They are also known for storing excess food by tucking it into the bark crevices of trees. They are solitary birds, only forming small flocks during migration.

They breed in late spring and early summer, creating a nest in a dead tree or snag and laying 3 to 9 white eggs. Both parents help in incubating the eggs and feeding the young birds until they can fly on their own.

Great Horned Owl – Bubo virginianus

Great Horned Owl

The Great Horned Owl is a large raptor, with a distinctive round head and prominent ear tufts. It has yellow eyes and dark brown feathers. Its diet consists mainly of small mammals such as mice and squirrels, but it also hunts birds, reptiles, amphibians, and insects.

In North Carolina, the Great Horned Owl can be found in a variety of habitats, including forests, swamps, and urban areas. It is a powerful hunter and uses its sharp talons to catch prey.

During breeding season, the Great Horned Owl has a deep hooting call that can often be heard at night. They are also known for their aggressive behavior towards other birds and animals that may threaten their territory.

Great Horned Owl range map

Hermit Thrush – Catharus guttatus

Hermit Thrush

In North Carolina, the Hermit Thrush can be identified by its brown upperparts, spotted breast, and reddish-brown tail. Its diet consists mainly of insects and berries. The average size of this bird is about 7-8 inches in length with a wingspan of 10-11 inches.

This bird prefers to reside in deciduous or coniferous forests, but can also be found in shrubby areas and even urban parks. It is a solitary bird, often seen foraging on the ground or perching on low branches. During the breeding season, the male will attract a mate by singing from high perches.

What’s the most common bird in North Carolina?

The answer may surprise you: it’s the Northern Cardinal. This brightly colored songbird can be found in wooded areas and gardens all across the state, where they feed on seeds and fruits. In urban areas, they can often be seen at bird feeders.

The Northern Cardinal is also a year-round resident of North Carolina, so you have a good chance of spotting one any time of the year.

Other common birds in the state include American Goldfinches, Mourning Doves, and Blue Jays. However, with over 400 species of birds recorded in North Carolina, there are plenty of opportunities for bird watching and discovering new avian friends.

What’s the rarest bird in North Carolina?

The Red-cockaded Woodpecker, a species listed as endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is one of the rarest birds in North Carolina.

This bird is known for carving cavities into pine trees for nesting and can only be found in longleaf pine forests, where it is estimated that less than 1% of its historic habitat remains.

Conservation efforts for this bird include preserving and restoring longleaf pine forests, as well as providing artificial cavity nesting sites. Other rare birds in North Carolina include the Piping Plover, Wood Stork, and Bachman’s Sparrow.

What kind of big birds are in North Carolina?

Some of the larger bird species that can be found in North Carolina include bald eagles, red-tailed hawks, great blue herons, wood storks, and turkey vultures.

These birds can often be spotted soaring above open fields or perching atop tall trees. Additionally, peregrine falcons and ospreys can also be found in certain areas of the state, particularly near coastal regions.

These birds play important roles in their ecosystems, serving as both predators and scavengers. With proper protection and conservation efforts, these majestic birds can continue to thrive in North Carolina for years to come.

Winter Birds in North Carolina

Winter is a great time for bird watching in North Carolina, as the state sees an influx of migratory species during this season. Some notable winter birds include Snowy Owls, Northern Harriers, and Rough-legged Hawks.

Other birds that can be found year-round but may be more easily spotted in the winter include American Robins, Cedar Waxwings, and Dark-eyed Juncos.

To attract winter birds to your backyard, make sure to keep bird feeders stocked with a variety of seeds and suet. You may also see an increase in bird activity at water sources, so be sure to keep bird baths or fountains thawed during the colder months.

With a bit of patience and some bird seed, you may just have a winter wonderland of birds in your own backyard.