American Goldfinch

Most Common Birds of North Dakota (with Pictures)

We’ll show you the most typical avian species in North Dakota, complete with photographs and relevant facts. Only reputable sources were used to collect the data, which was subsequently verified by an ornithologist.

Did you know that there are over 365 species of birds that can be found in North Dakota? It’s true! In this blog post, we will discuss the most common birds of North Dakota. These birds can be found in a variety of habitats, including wetlands, prairies, and forests. We will also provide pictures and videos of these birds so that you can get to know them better!

10 Most Common Birds of North Dakota:

  1. American Robin (40% frequency)
  2. Mourning Dove (35%)
  3. Common Grackle (28%)
  4. American Goldfinch (27%)
  5. Black-capped Chickadee (26%)

Facts about Birds in North Dakota:

State bird of North Dakota: Western Meadowlark

How many birds are recorded in North Dakota: 365

The biggest bird in North Dakota: Bald Eagle

The smallest bird in North Dakota: American Goldfinch

North Dakota National parks: Theodore Roosevelt National Park, Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail

Number of bird species in Theodore Roosevelt National Park: over 200

Birds you might see in Theodore Roosevelt National Park: American Goldfinch, Blue Jay, Brown Creeper, Northern Flicker

Birds in North Dakota:

American Goldfinch

American Goldfinch

write about characteristics, size, appearance, behavior, habitat, diet of American Goldfinch

The American Goldfinch, also known as the Eastern Goldfinch or simply the “Goldfinch”, is a small North American bird in the finch family.

It is migratory, moving south to winter in the United States and Mexico. Males have a black cap and wing bars, and a bright yellow body.

Females are paler overall and lack the black cap. The Goldfinch is a small bird, measuring about 12 cm in length and weighing only 15-20 grams. It has a wingspan of 20 cm.

The Goldfinch is easily distinguished by its bright yellow plumage. It also has black wing bars and a black cap (which is absent in females).

The Goldfinch is a social bird, typically found in flocks of several dozen birds. It feeds on seeds and insects. The Goldfinch breeds across most of North America, from Alaska to Florida. It winters in the southern United States and Mexico.

The American Goldfinch has been recorded in every U.S. state except Hawaii. It is the state bird of North Dakota. The American Goldfinch was first described by Linnaeus in 1758. There are three subspecies of American Goldfinch, which vary slightly in coloration.

The American Goldfinch is a common bird and not considered threatened or endangered. However, its populations have declined in recent years, likely due to habitat loss and fragmentation.

Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle

The Bald Eagle is a large bird of prey found in North America. Adults have a dark brown body and white head and tail. They are one of the largest birds in North America, with a wingspan that can reach up to two meters.

The Bald Eagle is a solitary bird except during the breeding season when pairs stay together to nest. They are opportunistic predators and feed on a variety of prey, including fish, birds, small mammals, and reptiles.

Bald Eagles build large nests in tall trees or on cliffs. Females are larger than males, on average.

Bald Eagles are known for their powerful beaks and talons, which they use to prey on fish, small mammals, and other birds. They typically hunt from a perch, swooping down on their unsuspecting prey.

Bald Eagles build large nests made of sticks and branches, which they line with soft materials such as grass, moss, or hair.

Bald Eagles are monogamous and mate for life. The female lays two to four eggs, which the male incubates while the female hunts. After hatching, both parents help feed and care for the young eagles.

Barn Swallow

The Barn Swallow is a small songbird found in North America. It has blue upper parts and rusty-red underparts. The Barn Swallow is one of the most widespread birds in the world, breeding across much of North America, Europe, Asia, and Africa.

The Barn Swallow is a small bird. The Barn Swallow is easily distinguished by its blue upperparts and rusty-red underparts. It also has a long, forked tail.

The Barn Swallow is a social bird, typically found in flocks of several dozen birds. It feeds on insects, which it catches in flight.

The Barn Swallow breeds across much of North America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. It winters in southern Africa.

The Barn Swallow has been recorded in every U.S. state except Hawaii.

The Barn Swallow is a common bird and is not considered threatened or endangered. However, its populations have declined in recent years, likely due to habitat loss and fragmentation.

Blue Jay

blue jay

Blue Jays are known for their striking blue coloration. They are also quite large, with a wingspan that can reach up to three feet.

Blue Jays are very intelligent birds and are known for their mischievous behavior. They are also excellent mimics and can imitate the calls of other birds and animals.

Blue Jays make their home in a variety of habitats, from forests to open fields. They typically eat insects, but can also feast on fruits and seeds. Blue Jays are common throughout North America. They are protected by law in many areas.

Blue Jays are a common sight in many parts of North America. They are easily recognizable by their blue plumage and large size.

Blue Jays are known for their intelligence and mischievous behavior. They eat a variety of foods, including insects, fruits, and seeds.

Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper

The Brown Creeper is a small, sparrow-sized bird with brown upper parts and white underparts. They have a long, thin, down-curved bill and a black cap with a white stripe behind the eye.

Their wings are brown with two whitish bars. Brown Creepers have a rust-brown tail which they often hold cocked upright.

Brown Creepers are very active birds and are constantly moving around, searching for food. They cling vertically to tree trunks and bark using their specially adapted feet and claws which have a strong grip.

They eat mostly insects, but also spiders, small reptiles, and amphibians.

Brown Creepers are found in North America from Alaska to Newfoundland, and south to California, New Mexico, and Florida. They live in a variety of habitats including forests, woodlands, and parks.

Brown Creepers are not common birds, but they are easy to spot because of their unique behavior and characteristic call. They are winter visitors to North Dakota.

Canada Goose

Canada Goose bird

The Canada Goose is a large bird, with a body length of up to 50 inches. The wingspan can reach up to six feet. The goose has a black head and neck, with a white chin strap. The body is brown or grey, with a white belly.

The Canada Goose is found in North America, from Alaska to Newfoundland. They are found in open areas, such as fields, marshes, and airports. The diet of the Canada Goose includes grasses, grains, insects, and small fish.

The Canada Goose is a social bird, usually found in flocks of up to 100 birds. They can be very aggressive when defending their territory or young. The Canada Goose is the official bird of Canada.

The Canada Goose is a protected species in many parts of North America. Hunting and habitat loss are the biggest threats to the goose population. The population of Canadian Geese has been increasing in recent years.

The best time to see Canada Geese is in the spring when they are migrating north. They can be seen in many parts of the United States, including Alaska, California, Oregon, and Washington. In the winter, they are found in the southern United States and Mexico.

House Sparrow

House Sparrow

The House Sparrow is a small bird, with a body length of only five to six inches. The wingspan is even smaller, at only four to five inches. The sparrow has a brown back and wings, with a grey chest and belly. The head is brown with some black markings.

House Sparrows are found in North America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. They prefer to live in areas with a lot of human activity, such as farms, villages, and towns. House Sparrows eat a variety of foods, including seeds, insects, and even scraps from humans.

House Sparrows are social backyard birds and often live in large flocks. They can be aggressive, especially when defending their territory. House Sparrows are not native to North America but were introduced from Europe in the 1850s.

The House Sparrow population has declined in recent years due to habitat loss and pesticide use. However, they have still considered a common bird species.

The best time to see House Sparrows is during the spring and fall when they are migrating. House Sparrows can be found in all parts of the United States.

Mourning Dove

Mourning Doves

Mourning Doves are one of the most common birds in North America.

Mourning Doves are small to medium-sized birds. They have a slim body and long, pointed tail. The wings are rounded and the bill is short and pointed. Males and females look similar, but males tend to be slightly larger than females.

Mourning Doves are pale brown to gray in color. They have a light-colored belly and a dark band on the tail.

Mourning Doves are very tame birds and can often be seen perched on power lines or fences.

They eat seeds, fruits, and insects. Mourning Doves prefer open areas such as fields, meadows, and scrublands.

They are monogamous backyard birds and mate for life. The female builds a nest of sticks in a tree or bush and the male helps to incubate the eggs. The chicks stay with their parents until they are able to fly away.

Mourning Doves can live up to 12 years in the wild.

Mourning Doves are not currently considered to be at risk of extinction. However, they are hunted for sport and their habitat is being destroyed by development. You can help protect Mourning Doves by supporting organizations that work to conserve their habitat.

Mourning doves are a common sight in North America, but many people don’t know much about them.

These small to medium-sized birds are pale brown or gray, with a light belly and dark band on the tail. They’re very tame backyard birds and can often be seen perched on power lines or fences. Mourning doves eat seeds, fruits, and insects.

Their habitat is open areas such as fields, meadows, and scrublands. They typically mate for life and the female builds a nest of sticks in a tree or bush.

The male helps to incubate the eggs and the chicks stay with their parents until they’re able to fly away.

Northern Flicker

Northern Flicker

The Northern Flicker is a medium-sized bird with a body length of 12 inches. The wingspan is 16 to 18 inches. The Flicker has a brownish-red back and wings, with a black bib.

The chest and belly are white, and the head is tan with a black stripe running through the eye.

The Northern Flicker is found in North America, from Alaska and Canada to Mexico. It prefers wooded areas, but can also be found in parks and gardens. The Flicker eats insects, berries, and seeds.

The Northern Flicker is a shy bird that is active during the day. It often perches on tree branches or on the ground. It nests in tree cavities.

The Northern Flicker is not currently considered to be at risk of extinction. However, its numbers have declined due to habitat loss and pesticide use.

You can help protect the Northern Flicker by supporting organizations that work to conserve its habitat.

Ring-necked Pheasant

Ring-necked Pheasant

The Ring-necked Pheasant is a large bird, measuring 24 to 30 inches in length. The wingspan can be up to 40 inches. The male is larger than the female and has a colorful plumage.

He has a rusty red head, chest, and back. His belly is white and he has a black ring around his neck. The female is mottled brown and has a light-colored ring around her neck.

The Ring-necked Pheasant is found in North America, Europe, and Asia. It prefers open areas such as fields, meadows, and farmland. The Ring-necked Pheasant eats insects, seeds, and fruits. They are monogamous birds and the female builds a nest of sticks in a tree or bush.

The chicks stay with their parents until they are able to fly away. Ring-necked Pheasants can live up to 12 years in the wild.

Ring-necked pheasants are common across much of North America, Europe, and Asia.

The male has a colorful plumage with a rusty red head, chest, and back. His belly is white and he has a black ring around his neck. The female is mottled brown and has a light-colored ring around her neck.

Ring-necked pheasants prefer open areas such as fields, meadows, and farmland. They eat insects, seeds, and fruits. Ring-necked pheasants are monogamous birds and the female builds a nest of sticks in a tree or bush.

The chicks stay with their parents until they are able to fly away.

American Robin

american robin

The American Robin is a medium-sized bird with a body length of about 12 inches. The wingspan is about 16 inches. The Robin has a reddish-brown back and wings, with a white belly and blackhead.

The American Robin is found in North America, from Alaska to Mexico. It prefers wooded areas, but can also be found in parks and gardens. The Robin eats insects, berries, and seeds.

The American Robin is a tame bird that can often be seen perched on power lines or fences. It nests in tree cavities.

The male helps to incubate the eggs and the chicks stay with their parents until they’re able to fly away.

The American Robin is not currently considered to be at risk of extinction. However, its numbers have declined due to habitat loss and pesticide use.

You can help protect the American Robin by supporting organizations that work to conserve its habitat.

Dark-eyed Junco

Dark-eyed Junco

The Dark-eyed Junco is a small bird, measuring only about six inches in length. The wingspan is eight to ten inches. The Junco has a gray body with black wings and tail. The head is white with a black mask around the eyes.

The Dark-eyed Junco is found in North America, from Alaska and Canada to Mexico. It prefers wooded areas, but can also be found in parks and gardens. The Junco eats insects, berries, and seeds.

The Dark-eyed Junco is a shy bird that is active during the day. It often perches on tree branches or on the ground. It nests in tree cavities.

The female builds the nest and incubates the eggs. The chicks stay with their parents until they are able to fly away.

Dark-eyed Juncos are common across much of North America. They are not currently considered to be at risk of extinction, but their numbers have declined due to habitat loss and pesticide use.

Song Sparrow

Song Sparrow

The Song Sparrow is a small bird, measuring only five to six inches in length. The wingspan is eight to nine inches. The Sparrow has a gray-brown body with a light-colored chest and belly. It has a brown cap and a white stripe over the eye.

The Song Sparrow is found in North America, from Alaska and Canada to Mexico. It prefers wooded areas, but can also be found in parks and gardens. The Sparrow eats insects, berries, and seeds.

The Song Sparrow is a shy bird that is active during the day. It often perches on tree branches or on the ground. It nests in tree cavities.

The female builds the nest and incubates the eggs. The chicks stay with their parents until they are able to fly away.

Common Grackle

Common Grackle

The Common Grackle is a large bird, measuring about nine inches in length. The wingspan is about eighteen inches. The Grackle has a black body with a green sheen. It has a long tail and a yellow beak.

The Common Grackle is found in North America, from Alaska to Mexico. It prefers open areas such as fields, meadows, and farmland. The Grackle eats insects, seeds, and fruits.

The Common Grackle is a social bird that often gathers in flocks. It can often be seen perched on power lines or fences. It nests in tree cavities.

The male helps to incubate the eggs and the chicks stay with their parents until they are able to fly away.

The Common Grackle is not currently considered to be at risk of extinction. However, its numbers have declined due to habitat loss and pesticide use.

You can help protect the Common Grackle by supporting organizations that work to conserve its habitat.

Black-capped Chickadees

Black-capped Chickadee

The Black-capped Chickadee is a small bird, measuring only four to five inches in length. The wingspan is six to seven inches. The Chickadee has a black cap and a gray body with white underparts.

The Black-capped Chickadee is found in North America, from Alaska and Canada to Mexico. It prefers wooded areas, but can also be found in parks and gardens. The Chickadee eats insects, berries, and seeds.

The Black-capped Chickadee is a social bird that often gathers in flocks. It can often be seen perched on tree branches or on the ground. It nests in tree cavities.

The female builds the nest and incubates the eggs. The chicks stay with their parents until they are able to fly away.

Black-capped Chickadees are common across much of North America. They are not currently considered to be at risk of extinction, but their numbers have declined due to habitat loss and pesticide use.

You can help protect the Black-capped Chickadee by supporting organizations that work to conserve its habitat.

Western Meadowlark

Western Meadowlark

The Western Meadowlark is a large bird, measuring about nine inches in length. The wingspan is about eighteen inches. The Meadowlark has a brown body with a white belly. It has a black throat and a yellow beak.

The Western Meadowlark is found in North America, from Alaska to Mexico. It prefers open areas such as fields, meadows, and farmland. The Meadowlark eats insects, seeds, and fruits.

The Western Meadowlark is a social bird that often gathers in flocks. It can often be seen perched on power lines or fences. It nests in tree cavities.

The male helps to incubate the eggs and the chicks stay with their parents until they are able to fly away.

The Western Meadowlark is not currently considered to be at risk of extinction, but its numbers have declined due to habitat loss and pesticide use.

Downy Woodpecker

Downy Woodpeckers

The Downy Woodpecker is the smallest woodpecker in North America, measuring about six inches in length. Its back is black with small white spots, its belly is white, and its head has a black cap and nape (back of the neck).

Both sexes have a small patch of red feathers on the back of their heads. Juvenile backyard birds are similar in appearance to adults, but their plumage is duller and their spots are less distinct.

The Downy Woodpecker can be found in a variety of habitats including forests, woodlands, parks, and gardens. It is a common bird that is often seen feeding on insects on tree trunks and branches.

The Downy Woodpecker is a year-round resident in most of its range, although some birds do migrate south for the winter.

The diet of the Downy Woodpecker consists mainly of insects, although it will also eat fruits and berries. Common insect prey includes beetles, ants, bees, and wasps.

The Downy Woodpecker uses its long, sticky tongue to capture insects that are hidden in crevices.

The Downy Woodpecker is a relatively tame bird and is often seen at backyard bird feeders. It is an agile flier and can hover in mid-air to reach insects on tree trunks and branches.

The Downy Woodpecker is a common and widespread bird that is well-adapted to living in human-altered habitats. It is an important predator of insects, making it a valuable member of the natural community.

White-breasted Nuthatch

White-breasted Nuthatch

The White-breasted Nuthatch is a small songbird that is found in North Dakota. They have a characteristic blue cap and white underparts. They are the only nuthatch species that has a red bill. They are usually about five inches long and weigh about half an ounce.

White-breasted Nuthatches live in deciduous and mixed forests. They are usually found in the upper parts of trees, where they forage for insects. They also eat seeds and nuts.

White-breasted Nuthatches are very active birds and can be quite playful. They are known to hang upside down from tree branches or poke their heads into birdhouses looking for food.

Red-winged Blackbird

Red-winged Blackbird

The Red-winged Blackbird is a medium-sized blackbird with red and yellow wings. They are common in North Dakota and can be found in open areas near water. These backyard birds are very vocal, and often sing while perched on top of a tall tree or fence post.

Red-winged Blackbirds eat seeds, insects, and other small creatures. They build their nests in tall grass or reeds near water. Red-winged Blackbirds are a common sight in North Dakota and are easily identifiable by their bright red and yellow wings.

These birds are very vocal, often singing while perched on top of a tall tree or fence post. Red-winged Blackbirds eat seeds, insects, and other small creatures. They build their nests in tall grass or reeds near water. If you see a blackbird with red and yellow wings in North Dakota, it is most likely a Red-winged Blackbird.

These birds are common and easily identifiable, so keep an eye out for them the next time you’re in the state!

Hairy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

The Hairy Woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker that is found in North Dakota. They have black and white plumage, and males have a red cap on their heads.

These backyard birds are mostly insectivores, but will also eat nuts and seeds. Hairy Woodpeckers typically live in forests or woodland areas.

Their nesting habits are similar to other woodpeckers. Both the male and female will excavate a nest hole in a tree, often using their beaks and feet.

They will then line the nest with wood chips. The Hairy Woodpecker typically lays between three to seven eggs per clutch.

The Hairy Woodpecker is a common bird in North Dakota and can be found in most wooded habitats. They are easily identified by their black and white plumage, and males have a red cap on their heads.

These backyard birds are mostly insectivores, but will also eat nuts and seeds.

Brown-headed Cowbird

Brown-headed Cowbird

The Brown-headed Cowbird is a small blackbird that is found in North Dakota. They have a brown head and a white throat.

Brown-headed Cowbirds are mainly insectivores, but will also eat fruits and berries. Common insect prey includes beetles, ants, bees, and wasps.

Brown-headed Cowbirds prefer to live in open areas near water, such as meadows, prairies, and pastures. They are not very common in North Dakota but can be found in the eastern part of the state.

Brown-headed Cowbirds are interesting birds to watch. They are known for following herds of bison and cows around in order to eat the insects that they stir up.

Eastern Kingbird

Eastern Kingbird

The Eastern Kingbird is a small songbird. They have a blackhead, back, and tail with a white throat and belly. their wings are dark with two white bars. Adult birds have a red crown, which they can sometimes flash during courtship or when agitated.

Their call is a sharp “chik” or “spick”, and their song is a series of piping notes.

Eastern Kingbirds are found in open habitats near water. They often hunt from perches, flying out to catch insects in midair.

Their diet consists mainly of flying insects, which they capture by swooping down on them from a vantage point. They also eat berries and seeds in the winter.

Eastern Kingbirds are common across most of North America and can be found in a variety of habitats including forests, fields, wetlands, and urban areas.

They are territorial backyard birds, defending their territory against other kingbirds, crows, and hawks. During the breeding season, they often chase away larger birds that come too close to their nest.

Eastern Kingbirds are one of the most common bird species in North Dakota and can be found in a variety of habitats including forests, fields, wetlands, and urban areas.

Barn Swallows

Barn Swallows

Barn swallows are one of the most common backyard birds in North Dakota. They have a characteristic long, forked tail and are about six inches long. Barn swallows are generally brown or black with a white breast.

They often build their nests under eaves or other overhangs on buildings. Barn swallows eat mostly insects, but can also eat small fish or spiders.

They are very agile flyers and can often be seen swooping down to catch insects in mid-air. Barn swallows are migratory, and most of them leave North Dakota for the winter months.

However, a few stay all year round. Barn swallows are an important part of the ecosystem, as they help to control the population of insects.

Barn swallows are one of the most common birds in North Dakota. They have a characteristic long, forked tail and are about six inches long. Barn swallows can be generally brown or black with a white breast often

Common North Dakota’s Fall and Winter Birds:

  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • Brown-headed Cowbird
  • Eastern Kingbird
  • Barn Swallow
  • American Goldfinch
  • House Finch
  • Pine Siskin
  • Common Redpoll
  • Hoary Redpoll

List the most Common North Dakota birds of spring, summer, and early fall:

  • The American Goldfinch
  • House Finch
  • Pine Siskin
  • Common Redpoll
  • Hoary Redpoll
  • Brown-headed Cowbird
  • Eastern Kingbird
  • Barn Swallow

Common Small birds in North Dakota:

  • House Finch
  • Pine Siskin
  • Common Redpoll
  • Hoary Redpoll
  • Brown-headed Cowbird
  • Eastern Kingbird
  • Barn Swallow

Tips for attracting birds to your yard in North Dakota:

  • put out a variety of food, including seeds, nuts, fruits, and insects
  • provide fresh water in a birdbath or other container
  • offer shelter from the wind and rain
  • place a nesting box in your yard
  • keep your cat indoors
  • avoid using pesticides and herbicides in your yard

Black oil sunflower seeds for bird feeders:

Are a good choice for North Dakota, as they are high in fat and protein.

Other good birdseed options include white proso millet, red milo, cracked corn, and peanuts.

Insects are an important part of a bird’s diet, so consider putting out a dish of mealworms or crickets.