arizona woodpeckers

Types of Woodpeckers in Arizona (with Pictures)

We’ll go through the most frequently encountered woodpeckers in Arizona, along with photographs and essential information. Only reputable sources were used to compile this data, which was verified by an Ornithologist.

There are many different types of woodpeckers in Arizona. Woodpeckers are interesting birds, and they can be quite entertaining to watch. If you live in Arizona, or if you are planning on visiting soon, it is a good idea to learn about the different types of woodpeckers that you might encounter.

Most Common Woodpeckers in Arizona

Arizona Woodpeckers

arizona woodpeckers

Arizona woodpeckers can be identified by their characteristic black and white plumage. They have a long, pointed bill that is used to extract insects from trees. Woodpeckers are cavity nesters, meaning they excavate their own nests in tree trunks or branches. They also use their bills to drum on trees as a form of communication. Woodpeckers are found in forests throughout Arizona.

Their diet consists primarily of insects, which they glean from tree bark or catch in flight. They will also eat berries and nuts. Woodpeckers play an important role in forest ecosystems by controlling insect populations.

They are also important in the process of seed dispersal.

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

The yellow-bellied sapsucker is a small woodpecker found in North America. They are easily identified by their black and white plumage, and the red stripe on their head. Yellow-bellied sapsuckers typically live in forests near water and can be found in both deciduous and coniferous forests.

These birds are known for their unique feeding habits; they drill holes in trees and then lap up the sap that flows out. They also eat insects, berries, and fruits. In addition to their unusual diet, yellow-bellied sapsuckers are also interesting because they are one of the few woodpecker species that migrate. They spend the winter in Central America and Mexico and return to North America in the spring.

Yellow-bellied sapsuckers are not typically aggressive birds, but they will defend their territory if necessary. They are monogamous, and both parents help care for the young. These birds can live up to 12 years in the wild.

Yellow-bellied sapsuckers are a common sight in Arizona and can be found in many of the state’s forests.

Lewis’s Woodpeckers

Lewis's Woodpecker

The Lewis’s Woodpecker is a stunning bird with a black body and bright redhead. These woodpeckers are found in the southwestern United States, including Arizona.

They prefer open woodlands with plenty of trees for nesting and foraging.

Lewis’s Woodpeckers are fairly large birds, measuring about nine inches in length.

They have a long, slender bill that is perfect for extracting insects from crevices in trees. These woodpeckers are also skilled climbers, and can often be seen scaling the trunks of tall trees.

Lewis’s Woodpeckers feed mainly on insects, but they will also eat fruit and seeds when available.

They are particularly fond of acorns and other nuts. In the spring and summer months, these woodpeckers often eat ants, beetles, and wasps. In the fall and winter, they switch to a diet of fruits and seeds.

Lewis’s Woodpeckers are social birds, and often form small flocks during the winter.

They are very vocal, and can often be heard making a loud “pecking” sound as they forage in the trees. These woodpeckers are monogamous, and pairs typically stay together year-round.

Williamson’s Sapsucker

williamson's sapsucker

Williamson’s Sapsuckers are medium-sized woodpeckers, typically 11 inches in length. They have a black head and back, with white stripes down their sides.

Their wings are black with white patches, and they have a bright red throat and belly.

Williamson’s Sapsuckers live in coniferous forests in the western United States and Canada. In Arizona, they are found in ponderosa pine forests at elevations of 4000-8000 feet.

Williamson’s Sapsuckers drill holes in trees to access sap, which they eat along with insects. They also eat fruit and berries.

Williamson’s Sapsuckers are shy birds and are typically seen alone or in pairs. They are usually quiet but can make a loud hammering noise when drilling into trees. They migrate south for the winter, spending time in Mexico and Central America.

Williamson’s Sapsuckers are interesting birds to watch and are an important part of our western forests.

Red-headed Woodpecker

red-headed woodpeckers

The Red-headed Woodpecker is a beautiful bird with a redhead and neck and white underparts. It has a black back, wings, and tail. The adult male has a red crown, while the female has a black forehead.

Both sexes have a white line running down the center of their backs. Juveniles are similar to adults, but their heads are brownish-red.

The Red-headed Woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker that measures about nine inches in length. Its wingspan is about 15 inches. It weighs between two and three ounces.

The Red-headed Woodpecker is found in open woods, forest edges, and swamps. It is a resident of the eastern United States, but it can also be found in parts of Canada and Mexico.

The Red-headed Woodpecker feeds on insects, nuts, and fruits. It often catches insects in midair. It will also eat suet from bird feeders.

The Red-headed Woodpecker is a cavity nester. It will excavate its own nest hole or use an existing one. The nest is usually in a dead tree or limb. The female will lay four to six eggs in the nest. Both parents help incubate the eggs and care for the young birds.

Red-Breasted Sapsucker

The Red-Breasted Sapsucker is a medium-sized woodpecker that can be found in Arizona. They have a blackhead, neck, and back, with a red chest and belly.

They are the only North American woodpecker with these colors. They have a long, slightly curved bill, and white stripes down their face. Males and females look alike.

Red-Breasted Sapsuckers are found in forests, especially coniferous forests. They nest in trees, making a hole in the tree for their nest. They often return to the same tree to nest each year.

These birds feed on sap from trees, as well as insects. They use their long bill to pry open the bark of trees and drink the sap. They also catch insects in flight. Red-Breasted Sapsuckers are year-round residents in Arizona.

Red-breasted sapsuckers are interesting birds to watch. They are very active, constantly moving around and foraging for food.

Gila Woodpecker

gila woodpecker

The Gila woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker found in the southwestern United States and Mexico. The adult male has a red cap, black back, white throat and belly, and a yellow breast. The adult female has a brown back and a white throat and belly.

The Gila woodpecker is found in desert habitats, where it nests in cactus plants or holes excavated in saguaro cacti.

The Gila woodpecker feeds on insects, fruits, and berries. It often caches food in crevices in tree bark. The Gila woodpecker is a shy bird and is not often seen. It is the only woodpecker found in the southwestern United States.

The Gila Woodpecker can be identified by its characteristic red cap, black back, and white throat. It is found in desert habitats in the southwestern United States and Mexico.

The Gila Woodpecker feeds on insects, fruits, and berries. It is a shy bird and is not often seen. The Gila Woodpecker is the only woodpecker found in the southwestern United States.

If you are lucky enough to see a Gila Woodpecker, you will most likely see it in a desert habitat in the southwestern United States or Mexico.

The Gila Woodpecker is a shy bird, so it is not often seen. If you do see one, you will notice its characteristic red cap, black back, and white throat.

The Gila Woodpecker feeds on insects, fruits, and berries.

The Gila woodpecker is an excellent example of an animal that has adapted to its desert environment. The red cap helps the bird to blend in with its surroundings. The Gila woodpecker is a shy bird, but it is still an important part of the desert ecosystem.

Related post: Types of Woodpeckers in New York

Red-naped Sapsucker

Red-naped Sapsucker

The red-naped sapsucker is a medium-sized woodpecker with a black back, white belly, and reddish head. Males have a red nape (back of the neck), while females have a brown nape.

Both sexes have white wing bars and a black tail with white outer feathers. These birds are found in woodlands, especially pine forests, across western North America.

Red-naped sapsuckers drill shallow holes in trees to reach the sap within.

They also eat insects, berries, and tree frogs. In winter, they may form small flocks and visit bird feeders. These birds mate for life and excavate nest cavities in dead trees or branches.

The female lays between three and seven eggs, which are incubated for about two weeks. After hatching, the young sapsuckers stay in the nest for another four to six weeks before fledging (leaving the nest).

The red-naped sapsucker is a common bird of the western United States. These birds are attracted to sap wells and can often be seen drilling holes in trees.

They are also known to visit bird feeders in winter. Red-naped sapsuckers breed from late spring into summer, laying three to seven eggs in a cavity excavated by the male.

The young hatch after two weeks of incubation and remain in the nest for another four to six weeks. Red-naped sapsuckers are generally considered beneficial birds, as they help extract sap from trees and also eat insects.

However, their drilling can also cause damage to tree bark. These woodpeckers are interesting to watch and make for a great addition to any birding list.

Acorn Woodpecker

Acorn Woodpecker

The Acorn Woodpecker is a small black and white woodpecker with a red cap. They are found in oak woodlands, riparian corridors, and other habitats with large trees. They forage on the bark of live trees for insects, as well as acorns and other nuts.

Acorn Woodpeckers are known for their ability to store acorns in tree crevices, which they use as a food source during the winter months. They are also known for their loud drumming, which is used to communicate with other members of their species.

Acorn Woodpeckers are social birds, living in small family groups or large flocks. They are monogamous, and the male and female work together to build their nest.

The nest is a hole in a tree, which is lined with soft materials such as grasses, moss, or hair. The female lays between three and six eggs, and both parents help to incubate them. The young birds leave the nest about two months after hatching.

Acorn Woodpeckers are omnivorous, eating a variety of insects, nuts, and berries. They can be beneficial to ecosystems by helping to disperse acorns and other nuts.

However, they can also be destructive when they forage on live trees for insects. Acorn Woodpeckers are common in Arizona, and their populations are believed to be stable.

If you live in Arizona and have an oak tree on your property, there’s a good chance you’ve seen an Acorn Woodpecker.

These small black and white woodpeckers with red caps are interesting birds that are known for their love of acorns, their loud drumming, and their social behavior. While they can be beneficial to ecosystems by dispersing acorns, they can also be destructive when they forage on live trees.

American Three-Toed Woodpecker

American-Three-Toed Woodpecker

The American three-toed woodpecker is a small to medium-sized woodpecker that is found in North America. The bird has a black body with white wings and a whitetail.

The male has a red cap on his head, while the female has a black cap. The bird gets its name from the fact that it has three toes on each foot, instead of the usual four.

The American three-toed woodpecker is found in coniferous forests in the mountains of Arizona. The bird nests in tree cavities and feeds on insects, berries, and nuts. The bird is also known to eat sap from trees.

The American three-toed woodpecker is a popular bird for birdwatchers. The bird is not shy and will often approach people. The bird is also known to be active during the day, which makes it easy to spot.

If you’re lucky enough to see an American three-toed woodpecker in Arizona, you’ll be able to witness an amazing bird that is both beautiful and unique.

Black-backed Woodpecker

Black-backed Woodpeckers

The Black-backed Woodpecker is a large woodpecker that is found in the western United States and Canada. They are black with a white stripe down the middle of their back, and they have a red crest on their head.

They are one of the largest woodpeckers in North America, and they can weigh up to a pound.

Black-backed Woodpeckers live in open forests and woodlands, where they can find plenty of trees to hunt insects in. They mainly eat insects, but they will also eat berries and seeds if they are available.

Black-backed Woodpeckers use their strong beaks to drill into trees in search of food. They also use their beaks to make nesting holes in trees.

Black-backed Woodpeckers are not very social birds, and they mostly stay alone or in pairs. However, during the breeding season, they will form small colonies. Black-backed Woodpeckers mate for life, and they usually have one mate at a time.

If you are lucky enough to see a Black-backed Woodpecker in the wild, you will likely hear them before you see them. They make a loud, drumming sound with their beaks on trees.

Northern Flicker

Red-tailed-Northern-Flicker

Northern Flickers are medium-sized woodpeckers with a black and white barred pattern on their wings. They have a red patch on the back of their head, which is where they get their name – “flicker.”

Northern Flickers can be found in open habitats such as fields, meadows, and parks. They are also common in woodlands and forests.

Northern Flickers are very active birds. They spend a lot of time foraging for food, which includes insects, spiders, fruits, and berries. Northern Flickers are also known to eat ants – up to 250 per day!

When they’re not eating or looking for food, Northern Flickers can often be seen perching on tree branches or flying from one place to another.

Downy Woodpecker

Downy Woodpeckers

Downy Woodpeckers are one of the smallest woodpeckers in North America.

They have black and white feathers, a small red cap on their head, and a short black beak. Downy Woodpeckers live in forests and woodlands, as well as urban areas. They eat insects, spiders, fruits, and nuts.

Downy Woodpeckers are known for their acrobatic abilities, as they can hang upside down from tree branches while looking for food.

They are also known for their loud drumming noises, which they use to communicate with other woodpeckers.

Downy Woodpeckers are a common sight in Arizona. They can be found in forests, woodlands, and even urban areas. Downy Woodpeckers eat a variety of insects, including ants, beetles, and caterpillars.

They also eat spiders, fruits, and nuts. Downy Woodpeckers are known for their acrobatic abilities – they can hang upside down from tree branches while looking for food.

They are also known for their loud drumming noises, which they use to communicate with other woodpeckers.

Hairy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

The Hairy Woodpecker is a woodpecker found in North America. The bird is black with white stripes on its back and has a red patch on the back of its head. The Hairy Woodpecker is about 18 cm long and weighs about 50 grams.

Habitat: The Hairy Woodpecker is found in forests, woodlands, and parks. The bird prefers to nest in trees, but will also nest in buildings and on telephone poles.

Behavior: The Hairy Woodpecker is a very active bird, and is often seen climbing trees or flying from tree to tree. The bird uses its long beak to drill into tree bark to find food. The Hairy Woodpecker is also known to eat insects, berries, and nuts.

Diet: The Hairy Woodpecker’s diet consists mainly of insects, but the bird will also eat berries and nuts. The Hairy Woodpecker has been known to eat ants, beetles, caterpillars, centipedes, cockroaches, crickets, wasps, and wood-boring larvae.

What do Arizona woodpeckers eat?

Arizona woodpeckers are known to eat a variety of different foods, including insects, berries, and nuts. In terms of insects, woodpeckers have been known to eat ants, beetles, caterpillars, and more.

How do you get rid of woodpeckers in Arizona?

The best way to get rid of woodpeckers is by using a combination of scare tactics and hazing.

Scare tactics include anything that startles or scares the bird away. Some examples are shiny objects, loud noises, or motion-activated sprinklers. You can also try hanging streamers or Mylar balloons from the areas where the woodpecker is active.

Hazing is a form of harassment that uses non-lethal methods to deter an animal from an area. For woodpeckers, this could involve spraying them with water from a hose or using an air horn or whistle to startle them.