Red-naped Sapsucker

Types of Woodpeckers in Kansas (with Pictures)

With pictures and important information, we’ll show you the most frequent woodpeckers in Kansas. Only reputable sources were used to gather the data, which was then verified by an Ornithologist.

There are many different types of woodpeckers that can be found in Kansas. In this blog post, we will discuss the most common types of woodpeckers in the state. These include the downy woodpecker, hairy woodpecker, northern flicker, and Pileated Woodpecker. We will give a brief description of each bird, as well as some interesting facts about them.

Most Common Woodpeckers in Kansas

Red-headed Woodpeckers

Red-naped Sapsucker

The Red-headed Woodpecker is a beautiful bird with a bright red head, black body, and white wings. These woodpeckers are found in open woods and forest edges across North America. The male and female look very similar, but the female has a smaller patch of red on her head.

Red-headed Woodpeckers feed on insects, especially ants. They also eat fruit and black oil sunflower seeds. These woodpeckers live in a variety of habitats, including forests, grasslands, and wetlands. They can be found in both rural and urban areas.

These birds are very active and often seen hopping along the ground or flying from tree to tree. They are also known for their loud, high-pitched calls. Red-headed Woodpeckers are interesting birds to watch and enjoy. If you are lucky enough to see one, take a moment to appreciate these beautiful creatures.

Downy Woodpecker (Picoides)

Downy Woodpeckers

The Downy Woodpecker is the smallest woodpecker in North America. They have a black cap, white cheeks, and a short bill. Downy Woodpeckers are often mistaken for Hairy Woodpeckers because of their similar coloring but can be distinguished by their smaller size and less prominent red mustache stripe. These birds are found in deciduous forests across North America where they nest in tree cavities. Downy Woodpeckers are year-round residents and do not migrate.

The Downy Owl is a small owl with a black cap and white cheeks. It has a short bill and is often mistaken for a Hairy Woodpecker. The Downy Owl is found in deciduous forests across North America where it nests in tree cavities. Downy Owls are year-round residents and do not migrate.

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker

The Red-bellied Woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker, measuring about 11 inches long. They have black and white plumage, with a red cap on their head. The belly is light orange or yellow in color. These birds are cavity nesters, meaning they build their nests in tree cavities. They typically eat insects, but will also eat fruits and nuts.

The Red-bellied Woodpecker is found in the eastern United States, from Maine to Florida. They are year-round residents in Kansas. Look for them in wooded areas, where they can be seen climbing trees in search of food. These birds are often heard before they are seen, as they have a loud, drumming sound. If you’re lucky, you may even see them catching insects in mid-air!

The best time of year to see the Red-bellied Woodpecker in Kansas is during the spring and summer months. Keep your eyes peeled and your ears open, and you’re sure to spot one of these beautiful birds.

In Kansas, the red-bellied woodpecker is a year-round resident in wooded areas, where it can be seen climbing trees in search of food. The best time of year to see the red-bellied woodpecker is during the spring and summer months.

Pileated Woodpeckers

Pileated Woodpeckers

The Pileated Woodpecker is one of the largest woodpeckers in North America. They have a characteristic black and white plumage, and a large red crest on their head. They are usually found in mature forests, but can also be seen in open areas near trees.

Pileated Woodpeckers are known for their loud drumming on trees. They use this to attract mates and to warn other woodpeckers of their territory. These birds also use their beaks to create large cavities in trees, which they then use for nesting and roosting.

Pileated Woodpeckers are shy birds and are not often seen by humans. If you do see one, it is important to give them space and not disturb their natural habitat. By doing so, we can help these beautiful birds continue to thrive.

Williamson’s Sapsucker

williamson's sapsucker

The Williamson’s sapsucker is a medium-sized woodpecker with a black back, white belly, and rusty wings. The head has a red cap, yellow eyebrow, and white throat. The male also has a red breast. These birds are found in the western U.S. and Canada. In the winter, they move south into Mexico.

The Williamson’s sapsucker drills holes in trees to get at the sap. They also eat insects, berries, and fruits. The female excavates a nest cavity in a dead tree or stump. She lays four to six white eggs in the nest. Both parents help to incubate the eggs and feed the young birds.

The Williamson’s sapsucker is named after Lt. Robert S. Williamson, who was on the Lewis and Clark expedition in 1804-06. The scientific name for this bird is Picoideswilliamsonii. This species is not considered to be at risk and its numbers are stable. However, like all birds, it is affected by habitat loss and fragmentation. You can help this species by planting native trees and shrubs in your yard or garden. You may be lucky enough to attract a Williamson’s sapsucker to your own backyard!

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

yellow-bellied sapsucker

The Yellow-bellied Sapsucker is a woodpecker that is found in North America. They are small to medium-sized birds with black and white plumage. The male has a red throat and the female has a yellowish throat. These birds are known for their habit of drilling holes in trees to drink the sap. They also eat insects and fruits. The Yellow-bellied Sapsucker is a common bird in Kansas and can be found in woodlands, parks, and gardens. If you are lucky, you may even see one in your backyard!

These birds are interesting to watch as they go about their daily activities. If you have never seen a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, be sure to keep an eye out for them the next time you are in Kansas!

Red-naped Sapsucker

Red-naped Sapsucker

The red-naped sapsucker is a medium-sized woodpecker found in North America. The adult male has a red cap extending to just below the nape, while the female has a black cap with a white band at the nape. Both sexes have a black back with white bars and a yellow breast with black spots. They have a long, black tail with white barring on the underside.

Red-naped sapsuckers are cavity nesters and will use old woodpecker holes, natural cavities in trees, or man-made nest boxes. They prefer to live in open areas near large trees, where they can forage for their food.

These woodpeckers are unique in their feeding habits. They drill small holes in trees and drink the sap that flows out. They also eat insects attracted to the sap, as well as fruit and berries. In winter, they may cache large quantities of food (up to 150 acorns!) to help them survive when food is scarce.

Red-naped sapsuckers are mostly monogamous, and both parents help raise the young. The chicks stay with their parents for up to a year. These birds are cavity nesters and will use old woodpecker holes, natural cavities in trees, or man-made nest boxes. They prefer to live in open areas near large trees, where they can forage for their food.

The best time to see Red-naped sapsuckers is during the breeding season (April-May) when the males are establishing territories and attracting mates. However, these birds can be seen year-round in many parts of North America.

Related article: Types of Woodpeckers in New Hampshire

Flickers

Northern Flicker (also known as Yellow-Shafted Flicker):

Northern Flicker

The Northern Flicker is a large woodpecker that can be found in most of North America. They are one of the few woodpeckers that exhibit sexual dimorphism, with the male being significantly larger than the female. They have a distinctive black and white barred pattern on their wings and a red patch on the nape of their neck.

Northern Flickers are cavity nesters, meaning they nest in holes in trees. They will also use birdhouses if available. The female lays anywhere from three to eight eggs, and both parents help incubate them and feed the young. Northern Flickers are diurnal, meaning they are active during the day.

Red-tailed Northern Flicker:

The Red-tailed Northern Flicker is a subspecies of the Northern Flicker. They are found in western North America, from British Columbia to central Mexico. They are very similar in appearance to the Northern Flicker but can be distinguished by their red tail feathers.

Red-tailed Northern Flickers are also cavity nesters and will use birdhouses if available. They lay anywhere from four to eight eggs, and both parents help incubate them and feed the young. Red-tailed Northern Flickers are diurnal, meaning they are active during the day.

Both the Northern Flicker and the Red-tailed Northern Flicker make great backyard birds! They are attracted to birdhouses and backyard feeders, and will readily eat a variety of foods, including insects, sunflower seeds, and fruit.

So if you’re looking for a large woodpecker to add to your backyard bird list, be sure to check out the Northern Flicker or the Red-tailed Northern Flicker! They are sure to provide you with plenty

Lewis’s Woodpecker

Lewis's Woodpecker

Lewis’s Woodpeckers are fairly large woodpeckers, measuring about 18 inches in length. They are black with white wings and a white back and have a red cap on their head. Lewis’s Woodpeckers nest in holes that they excavate in trees, and will also use abandoned woodpecker holes.

These birds can be found in open forests and woodlands throughout Kansas. Lewis’s Woodpeckers are insectivores and eat a variety of insects, including ants, beetles, caterpillars, and grasshoppers. They also eat fruit and seeds.

These woodpeckers are generally shy and secretive and can be difficult to observe. However, they can sometimes be seen foraging for insects on the ground or in the trees. Lewis’s Woodpeckers are a common sight in Kansas and can be found in many of the state’s wooded areas.

They are beautiful birds to watch, and their distinctive call is a familiar sound in the woods. If you are lucky enough to see one of these birds, you will certainly be impressed by their size and beauty.

Hairy Woodpecker

hairy woodpecker

The Hairy Woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker with a black cap, white face and throat, and black back. The male has a red mustache. They have a long, straight bill and are mainly gray above and white below. These birds often forage on the ground or in trees near water. They eat insects, larvae, and sometimes berries.

The Hairy Woodpecker is found in North America from Alaska to Newfoundland, south to Florida, and the northern Gulf Coast. In Kansas, they are most common in the eastern half of the state. Look for them in woodlands, parks, and even your backyard! These birds will nest in dead trees or stumps, often excavating a new cavity each year. The female lays three to seven eggs in a nest made of wood chips. Both parents help incubate the eggs and care for the young birds.

You can attract Hairy Woodpeckers to your yard by providing nesting sites and food. To create a nesting site, install a dead tree or snag, or drill holes in a log. You can also attract them with suet backyard feeders, which offer insects for the birds to eat.

American Three-Toed Woodpecker

American-Three-Toed Woodpecker

The American three-toed woodpecker is a small to medium-sized woodpecker that is found in North America. The adult has black upperparts, white underparts, and a blackhead with white stripes. The wings are black with white bars and the tail is black with a white tip. The bill is chisel-shaped and the legs are short. The American three-toed woodpecker is a cavity nester and feeds on insects, fruits, and nuts.

The American three-toed woodpecker is a fascinating bird that is well worth learning more about! If you find yourself in Kansas, be sure to keep an eye out for this amazing bird!