gila woodpecker

Types of Woodpeckers in New Mexico (with Pictures)

There are many different types of woodpeckers that can be found in New Mexico. In this blog post, we will discuss the four most common types of woodpeckers in the state. These include the Acorn Woodpecker, Hairy Woodpecker, Downy Woodpecker, and Pileated Woodpecker. Each of these birds has its own unique characteristics and habits. We will go over what makes each one special and how to identify them.

The data was acquired only from trustworthy sources and verified with an Ornithologist.

Most Common Woodpeckers in New Mexico

Hairy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

The Hairy Woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker found in North America. They are black and white with a black cap and a white back. The males have a red patch on the back of their head.

The females do not have this patch. These birds are about 16 to 20 cm long with a wingspan of about 30 cm. They weigh about 50 to 70 grams.

Hairy Woodpeckers are found in forests and woodlands. They nest in tree cavities. These birds eat insects, larvae, and wood-boring beetle grubs. They use their long tongue to reach the food inside the trees. Hairy Woodpeckers are also known to eat fruit, nuts, and seeds.

The Hairy Woodpecker is a year-round resident in New Mexico. These birds are most active during the day. You can hear their loud call in the forests and woodlands of New Mexico.

Acorn Woodpecker

Acorn Woodpecker

The Acorn Woodpecker is a small black and white bird with a red cap on its head. They are found in woodlands across North America. These birds are known for their habit of drilling holes in trees to store acorns.

Acorn Woodpeckers are social birds that live in family groups. They are also known to be very noisy, often making a loud drumming sound with their beaks.

If you are lucky enough to spot an Acorn Woodpecker, you may see them drilling holes in tree trunks or flying from branch to branch in search of food.

red-headed woodpeckers

Red-headed Woodpecker

The red-headed woodpecker is one of the most easily identifiable birds in North America. It is a large, black and white bird with a bright red head. The back and wings are black, and the belly is white.

The male has a red patch on the back of his head, while the female does not. These birds are found in wooded areas across the continent, and they are known for their loud, high-pitched calls.

Red-headed woodpeckers are very active birds. They are constantly moving about in search of food, and they are often seen hanging upside down from tree branches.

These birds eat a variety of insects, as well as nuts, berries, and fruits. They will also visit bird feeders in search of food.

Red-headed woodpeckers are excellent climbers, and they are often seen scaling tree trunks in search of food. They are also known for their nesting habits.

These birds will excavate large holes in trees in which to build their nests. They will also use these holes to store food for the winter months.

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker

The red-bellied woodpecker is a small to medium sized woodpecker with a black and white striped back, white underparts, and a reddish wash on the belly. The male has a red cap whereas the female’s cap is gray. This bird can be found in woodlands across eastern North America.

The red-bellied woodpecker is a cavity nester and will excavate its own nest hole or use an existing one. This bird feeds on insects, nuts, and fruits. The red-bellied woodpecker will often cache food for later consumption.

This bird is not currently considered to be at risk of extinction. However, habitat loss and fragmentation are potential threats to the species.

The best way to attract a red-bellied woodpecker to your backyard is to provide a suet feeder or a birdhouse. These birds are also attracted to areas with lots of trees.

Red-Breasted Sapsucker

Red-breasted Sapsucker

The red-breasted sapsucker is a medium-sized woodpecker with a black back, white belly, and rusty patches on the wings. The male has a red breast, while the female’s is yellowish.

These birds are found in coniferous or mixed forests in North America. They drill neat rows of holes in trees to eat the sap and insects attracted to it.

The red-breasted sapsucker is a shy bird, but it will often come to backyard feeders. It is an interesting bird to watch, and it can be fun to try to attract one to your yard.

If you live in an area where these birds are found, you can put out a suet feeder or a sapwell to attract them. You may also see these birds feeding on fruit or flying insects.

These birds are cavity nesters, and they will often use man-made nest boxes. If you put up a nest box in your yard, you may be able to attract a red-breasted sapsucker to it. These birds are also known to nest in old woodpecker holes.

gila woodpecker

Gila Woodpecker

The Gila Woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker found in the southwestern United States and Mexico. The adult male has a red cap, black back, white belly, and black wings with white bars. The adult female has a brownish back and a whitish belly. Both sexes have a black bill and yellow eyes. Juveniles are similar to adults but have brownish caps.

The Gila Woodpecker is a cavity nester and excavates holes in dead trees or cacti for nesting. Both sexes help to excavate the nest hole which is about three inches wide and up to two feet deep. The female lays between three and eight eggs in the nest.

The Gila Woodpecker feeds on insects, fruits, and seeds. Insects make up the majority of the diet and are obtained by foraging on the trunks and branches of trees. Fruits and seeds are eaten when they are available. The Gila Woodpecker is known to store acorns and other nuts in crevices in trees to eat later.

The Gila Woodpecker is found in woodlands, canyons, and deserts in the southwestern United States and Mexico. In New Mexico, the Gila Woodpecker is found in the Gila National Forest and Lincoln National Forest. The Gila Woodpecker is a permanent resident and does not migrate.

Northern Flicker

Northern Flicker

The Northern Flicker is a beautiful bird with a reddish brown back and black and white barred wings. The underparts are pale yellow with black bars on the breast. Adults have a red crescent on the nape of their neck and a black mustache mark.

The male also has a red patch on his wing. Juveniles are similar to adults but lack the red patches. The Northern Flicker is a member of the woodpecker family and is the only North American woodpecker with this plumage. They are also one of the few birds that have adapted to eating ants.

The Northern Flicker is found in open woods, parks, and gardens throughout North America. They are most common in the western United States, but can also be found in the eastern United States and Canada. In New Mexico, they are year-round residents.

The Northern Flicker is a solitary bird except during breeding season. They nest in tree cavities or nest boxes. The female lays between four and six eggs which hatch after about two weeks. The young birds fledge after about four weeks.

The Northern Flicker is an important bird for controlling insect populations. They eat a variety of insects, including ants, beetles, grasshoppers, and wasps. They also eat fruits and berries. You can attract Northern Flickers to your yard by putting out a suet feeder or a bird bath.

Golden-fronted Woodpecker

Golden-fronted Woodpecker

The Golden-fronted Woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker found in North America.

Males have a golden-yellow forehead and cap, while females have a white forehead.

Both sexes have black and white stripes on the face, back, and wings. The belly is white with black bars.

These woodpeckers are found in open woodlands, forest edges, and riparian areas.

They nest in tree cavities which they excavate themselves. Both parents help to raise the young.

The Golden-fronted Woodpecker is a permanent resident of New Mexico. In the winter, they will form small flocks and forage together.

arizona woodpeckers

Arizona Woodpeckers

There are many different types of woodpeckers in Arizona, but the Arizona woodpecker is the largest. It is black with a white breast and has a red crest. The male has a black moustache. The female does not. Both sexes have white stripes on their wings.

The Arizona woodpecker is found in the desert and in the mountains. It is a very shy bird and is not often seen. When it is seen, it is usually high up in a tree or on a power line.

The Arizona woodpecker eats insects, berries, and acorns. It also drinks sap from trees.

The Arizona woodpecker nests in a hole in a tree. The female lays six to eight eggs. Both parents help to raise the young.

The Arizona woodpecker is not endangered. However, it is protected by law in some states.

Lewis's Woodpecker

Lewis’s Woodpecker

The Lewis’s Woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker found in North America. The adult male has a red cap, white face, and black back. The adult female has a brown cap and back.

Both sexes have a white belly with black bars. Juveniles are similar to adults but have browner plumage. This woodpecker can be found in open woodlands, forest edges, and riparian areas. It feeds on insects, berries, and fruits.

The Lewis’s Woodpecker is a cavity nester and will excavate its own nest hole or use an existing one. This woodpecker is not currently considered threatened or endangered. However, habitat loss and fragmentation are a concern for this species.

Downy Woodpeckers

Downy Woodpecker

The Downy Woodpecker is the smallest woodpecker in North America, and can be found in woods across the continent. They are black and white, with a black cap, white cheeks, and a white back with small black spots.

The male has a red patch on the back of his head, while the female does not. Downy Woodpeckers are very vocal, and their calls can be heard throughout the day.

Downy Woodpeckers are acrobatic birds, and are often seen hanging upside down from tree branches. They eat insects, which they find by drilling holes into tree bark. Downy Woodpeckers will also visit bird feeders, where they eat sunflower seeds.

In New Mexico, Downy Woodpeckers can be found in a variety of habitats, including forests, woodlands, and even urban areas. They are year-round residents of the state, and can be seen all across New Mexico.

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

The Yellow-bellied Sapsucker is a small woodpecker, measuring between seven and eight inches in length. The back of the head and upper body are black, while the lower body is white with yellowish spots.

The wings are barred with black and white stripes, and the tail is black with white bars. Juveniles have duller plumage than adults.

The Yellow-bellied Sapsucker is found in wooded areas across North America. In the summer, they can be found in the northern United States and southern Canada. They migrate to the southeastern United States and Mexico in the winter.

The Yellow-bellied Sapsucker feeds on sap from trees. They drill holes in the bark of trees and sip the sap that flows out. They also eat insects, berries, and fruits.

The Yellow-bellied Sapsucker is a cavity nester. The female excavates a nest hole in a tree using her bill. She lines the nest with wood shavings and soft materials. The female lays four to six eggs in the nest.

Both parents incubate the eggs for about two weeks. The young sapsuckers leave the nest after about three weeks.

The Yellow-bellied Sapsucker is a protected species in some states, including New Mexico.

Red-naped Sapsucker

Red-naped Sapsucker

The Red-naped Sapsucker is a small woodpecker that is black, white, and reddish brown in color. This bird can be found in the western United States and Mexico. The male has a red nape (back of the neck) while the female has a yellow nape.

Both sexes have a white breast with black and white stripes on the back. The wings are black with white bars and the tail is black with a white tip. The bill is long and straight, and the legs are short.

These birds breed in coniferous forests where they excavate nest holes in trees. They also eat sap from trees, as well as insects and fruit. Red-naped Sapsuckers are often seen flying from tree to tree in search of food.

They will also visit bird feeders. When they are not feeding, they can be found perching on trees or wire fences.

If you see a Red-naped Sapsucker, you may hear it make a loud, rapid drumming noise on a tree trunk. This is the bird’s way of attracting a mate or defending its territory. You may also hear the bird make a “pik” sound when it is eating sap from a tree.

American-Three-Toed Woodpecker

American Three-toed Woodpecker

The American three-toed woodpecker is a small to medium sized woodpecker. The length of the bird ranges from six to eight inches and the wingspan can be up to fifteen inches. The back of the head and neck are black with a white line that goes down the middle of the back.

The sides of the face are white with a black line that goes through the eye. The belly is white with black spots. The male and female look alike, but the male has a red patch on the back of the head.

The American three-toed woodpecker can be found in forests across North America. In New Mexico, they are most often found in the mountains and in the northern part of the state. The woodpecker feeds on insects, berries, and nuts. They will also eat sap from trees.

The woodpecker excavates nesting cavities in trees. Both the male and female help to excavate the nest. The nesting cavity is usually about twelve inches deep and six inches wide. The female lays three to seven eggs in the nest. The young hatch after about two weeks. Both parents help to feed the young.

williamson's sapsucker

Williamson’s Sapsucker

The Williamson’s sapsucker is a medium-sized woodpecker with black and white plumage. The male has a red throat and breast, while the female has a brown throat and breast.

This species is found in coniferous forests of the western United States and Mexico. They nest in cavities excavated in trees, often using man-made structures such as power poles and buildings.

The Williamson’s sapsucker drills holes in trees to feed on sap and insects. They also eat fruit, berries, and seeds. These birds are most active during the day, but they may also be seen feeding at night.

When foraging, Williamson’s sapsuckers often use their tails as props. They also bob their heads and flick their tongues while feeding.

This behavior is thought to help the birds locate insects under the bark. Williamson’s sapsuckers are known to cache food, storing sap in tree holes for later consumption.

How to attract woodpeckers?

Woodpeckers are attracted to trees, especially those with sap. They also like bird feeders. To attract woodpeckers, try putting up a bird house or feeding station in your yard.

You can also try hanging fruit from tree branches or playing recordings of woodpecker sounds. Woodpeckers are interesting birds to watch, so take some time to learn about them. You may be surprised by how much you enjoy observing these feathered friends.

How often Woodpeckers are seen in New Mexico in Summer and Winter?

Woodpeckers are more often seen in New Mexico during the winter months. However, they can be spotted throughout the year if you know where to look.

In summer, woodpeckers can be found in forests and mountains, while in winter they are more likely to be seen in urban areas.

Does New Mexico have woodpeckers?

Yes, New Mexico does have woodpeckers. In fact, there are several different species of woodpeckers that can be found in the state.

How do I identify a woodpecker?

There are a few ways to identify a woodpecker. One way is to listen for the sound of the bird pecking on a tree trunk.

Woodpeckers also make a “pik” sound when they are eating sap from a tree. Another way to identify a woodpecker is by its appearance.

Are there woodpeckers in Albuquerque New Mexico?

Yes, there are woodpeckers in Albuquerque New Mexico. There are several different species of woodpeckers that can be found in the state, including the American three-toed woodpecker and the Williamson’s sapsucker. Woodpeckers are more often seen in New Mexico during the winter months.

Are woodpeckers protected in NM?

Yes, woodpeckers are protected in NM. The American three-toed woodpecker and the Williamson’s sapsucker are both protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. This act makes it illegal to hunt, kill, or capture these birds.