Northern Flicker

Types of Woodpeckers in NJ (with Pictures)

Woodpeckers are a common sight in New Jersey, and there are many different types of them. In this blog post, we will discuss the most common woodpecker species in NJ, as well as what makes them unique. We will also provide some tips on how to identify different woodpecker species. So if you’re interested in learning more about these fascinating birds, keep reading!

The information was obtained and verified by a bird biologist.

Most Common Woodpeckers in New Jersey

Downy Woodpeckers

Downy Woodpecker

The Downy Woodpecker is the smallest woodpecker in North America. Adults are about seven inches long with a black and white striped back, wings, and tail. The head is black with a small white patch behind each eye.

Both sexes have a small red patch on the back of the head, but it is usually more prominent on males. The bill is short and black, and the legs and feet are gray. Juveniles have brownish-black upperparts with buffy streaks on the back.

The Downy Woodpecker can be found in woodlands, parks, and backyards throughout North America. These birds are year-round residents of New Jersey. downy woodpeckers are most active during the day, although they may feed nocturnally.

They typically forage for insects on tree trunks and branches, using their bills to drill holes in the bark. Downy Woodpeckers will also eat sap, berries, and nuts. These birds often nest in tree cavities excavated by the male. Both sexes help to raise the young.

The Downy Woodpecker is a common bird, and its numbers have remained stable in recent years. However, this species may be declining in some parts of its range due to habitat loss.

Northern Flicker

Northern Flicker (or Yellow-shafted Flicker)

The Northern Flicker is a member of the woodpecker family. These birds are fairly large, measuring about 11 to 13 inches in length with a wingspan of up to 19 inches. They have brownish-red upperparts with black bars and buffy underparts with black spotting.

The male has a red crescent on his chest, while the female has a brownish-red crescent. Northern Flickers are also distinguished by their long, pointed beaks and long tongues, which they use to probe for ants and other insects.

Behaviorally, Northern Flickers are very active birds. They are constantly in motion, climbing trees and hopping on the ground in search of food. They are also known to be quite vocal, making a variety of loud calls and drumming noises with their beaks.

When they are not eating or searching for food, Northern Flickers enjoy spending time in the sun, basking in the warm rays.

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker

The red-bellied woodpecker is a small to medium-sized woodpecker with crimson on the lower belly and sides of the neck. The back is zebra-striped black and white, while the wings are mostly white with large black patches. This bird also has a conspicuous white rump.

The tail is long and black, with white outer feathers. The red-bellied woodpecker’s bill is chisel-shaped and black, and the legs and feet are gray. Adult males have a small red cap on the top of the head, while females have a smaller patch of red or no red at all. Juveniles look similar to adults but their plumage is duller.

This bird is found in woods and forests throughout much of the eastern United States. The red-bellied woodpecker feeds on insects, nuts, and fruits. It often climbs tree trunks in search of food, using its strong bill to drill into bark to find insects to eat. This bird also frequents bird feeders.

The red bellied woodpeckers are a relatively common bird, and their number has been stable in recent years. This species is not considered to be at risk of extinction.

Red-headed Woodpeckers

Red-headed Woodpeckers

The red-headed woodpecker is a beautiful bird that can be found in New Jersey. These birds are very small, and they have red heads with white patches on their wings.

They also have black bodies with white stripes running down their backs. These birds are very shy, and they will usually only come out during the day when there are no people around. When they are scared, they will often hide in trees or under leaves.

If you see one of these birds, it is important to remember that they are very delicate and should not be handled.

These birds are most active during the day, and they usually only come out at night if there is a full moon. They are very social creatures, and they will often build their nests in trees near other red-headed woodpeckers.

These birds are also very good at flying, and they can often be seen chasing each other through the air. When they are not flying, they will usually be found perched on a tree branch or sitting on the ground.

hairy woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

The Hairy Woodpecker is a common bird found in New Jersey. It is a medium sized woodpecker with black and white stripes on its back. The male has a red patch on the back of its head, while the female does not.

The Hairy Woodpecker can be seen pecking at trees in search of food. It also feeds on insects and berries. The Hairy Woodpecker is a friendly bird that can often be seen around people.

The Hairy Woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker, measuring between 16-19 cm in length and 30-35 cm in width. The bird has blackish upperparts with white stripes running down its back, while its underparts are mostly white.

Its head is black with a white line running from the beak to the back of the head. The male Hairy Woodpecker has a red patch on the back of its head, while the female does not.

The Hairy Woodpecker is found in woods and forests across North America. In New Jersey, it can be found in both urban and rural areas. The bird feeds on insects, berries, and tree sap. The Hairy Woodpecker is a friendly bird that can often be seen around people.

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

The Yellow-bellied Sapsucker is a medium-sized woodpecker, measuring between 17 and 19 cm in length with a wingspan of 30 to 34 cm. The adult male has a red forehead, throat, and breast while the female has a yellow throat and breast. Both sexes have a black back, wings, and tail with white bars.

The belly is yellow in both sexes, although it can look more orange or even red in some males. The juvenile is similar to the adult but with a brownish back and wings.

The Yellow-bellied Sapsucker breeds in deciduous and mixed forests across Canada and the northeastern United States. In New Jersey, they are found in the northern and western parts of the state. They are a migratory species, wintering in the southeastern United States, Mexico and Central America.

The Yellow-bellied Sapsucker drills small holes in tree bark to reach sap underneath. They also eat insects, berries and fruits. You may see them feeding on suet at bird feeders.

The best time to see Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers in New Jersey is from April to May during the breeding season and again from September to October during migration. Look for them in forests and woodlands, especially near maples and birches. Listen for their distinctive “pik” call.

Pileated Woodpecker

Pileated Woodpecker

The Pileated Woodpecker is a very distinctive bird and is the largest woodpecker in North America. They are black with white stripes on their face and neck and have a red crest on their head.

The male has a red line running down the middle of his crest while the female does not. Both sexes have white underparts with black bars. They have a wingspan of up to four feet and can be up to two feet long from head to tail.

Pileated Woodpeckers are found in forests across North America. In New Jersey, they are most commonly found in the northern and central parts of the state. They prefer woods with large trees that are at least ten acres in size.

Pileated Woodpeckers are cavity nesters and will excavate their own nesting holes or use ones that have been made by other birds.

Pileated Woodpeckers are mostly active during the day and can often be seen climbing up tree trunks in search of insects to eat.

How do I attract woodpeckers to my backyard?

One of the best ways to attract woodpeckers to your backyard is to put up a birdhouse. Woodpeckers are cavity nesters, which means they like to nest in holes in trees. By putting up a birdhouse, you’ll provide them with a perfect place to nest. Birdhouses should be made of wood and should be put up in early spring.

Another way to attract woodpeckers is to put out a bird feeder. Woodpeckers love to eat insects, so putting out a bird feeder filled with mealworms is a great way to attract them. You can also put out a suet feeder, which is a type of bird feeder that is filled with a high-fat substance that birds love. Suet feeders should be put out in the winter months when woodpeckers are looking for extra food to help them survive the cold weather.

Are woodpeckers protected in NJ?

Yes, woodpeckers are protected in New Jersey. The state has four species of woodpeckers that are listed as either threatened or endangered: the Red-headed Woodpecker, the Ivory-billed Woodpecker, the Hairy Woodpecker, and the Pileated Woodpecker. All four of these species are protected under the Endangered Species Act. In addition, the state has two species of woodpeckers that are listed as threatened under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act: the Yellow-bellied Sapsucker and the Red-cockaded Woodpecker. These laws protect woodpeckers from being killed, captured, or harmed in any way.

What does it mean when woodpeckers pecking at your house?

It’s not uncommon for woodpeckers to peck at houses. They usually do this because they’re looking for insects to eat. Woodpeckers will also peck at houses in order to create a nesting hole. If you have a woodpecker that is repeatedly pecking at your house, it’s important to take steps to deter it. Otherwise, the woodpecker could cause damage to your house.

What is the most common woodpecker in New Jersey?

The most common woodpecker in New Jersey is the Yellow-bellied Sapsucker. The Yellow-bellied Sapsucker is a small to medium-sized woodpecker that is found in forests across North America. In New Jersey, they are most commonly found in the northern and central parts of the state.

What types of woodpeckers are in New Jersey?

The four most common types of woodpeckers in New Jersey are the Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, the Red-headed Woodpecker, the Hairy Woodpecker, and the Pileated Woodpecker. All four of these species are protected under state and federal law.