Golden-fronted Woodpecker

Types of Woodpeckers in Texas (with Pictures)

Texas is home to many different types of woodpeckers. Woodpeckers are a type of bird that is known for their habit of pecking on tree trunks. They use their beaks to extract insects from the crevices in the bark. There are many different species of woodpecker, and each has its own unique features. In this blog post, we will discuss the most common types of woodpecker in Texas!

This information was obtained only from reputable sources and has been verified by an Ornithologist.

Most Common Woodpeckers of Texas

Downy Woodpeckers

Downy Woodpecker

The Downy Woodpecker is the smallest woodpecker in North America, measuring just six to seven inches in length. The male has a black back and wings with white spots, while the female’s plumage is more brownish.

Both sexes have a black bib, white belly and sides, and a small patch of red feathers on the back of the head.

The Downy Woodpecker is a common sight at backyard bird feeders, where it can often be seen clinging upside down to the side of a tree trunk or feeder pole. These acrobatic little birds are also adept at catching insects in mid-air.

When foraging for food, Downy Woodpeckers will often use their long tongues to probe deep into crevices in tree bark.

Downy Woodpeckers are found in forests and woodlands throughout North America. In the winter, these birds often form small flocks and can be seen foraging for food together.

Downy Woodpeckers are known to mate for life, and the pair will often work together to excavate a nesting cavity in a tree. These woodpeckers are also known to use man-made structures, such as birdhouses, for nesting.

Lewis's Woodpecker

Lewis’s Woodpecker

The Lewis’s Woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker with a black body and white wing patches. The male has a red cap, while the female has a brownish-red cap.

This bird is found in open woodlands of western North America. In Texas, it is most commonly seen in the Panhandle and West Texas.

The Lewis’s Woodpecker is a cavity nester, which means it excavates its own nesting hole in a tree.

This bird feeds on insects, fruits, and nuts. It often forages by acrobatically flipping over leaves in search of food. The Lewis’s Woodpecker is also known to eat the eggs of other birds.

The Lewis’s Woodpecker is a very social bird. It often forms flocks with other woodpeckers and even non-woodpecker species.

This bird has a loud, high-pitched call that sounds like “kik-kik-kik.” The Lewis’s Woodpecker is an important part of the ecosystem, as it helps to control insect populations.

red-cockaded woodpecker

Red-cockaded Woodpecker

The Red-cockaded Woodpecker is a small to medium sized woodpecker. The adult male has a black back with white bars, a white chest and belly, and a red cap. The adult female has a black back with white bars, a white chest and belly, but does not have a red cap.

Immature birds are similar to the adult female, but have brownish caps. The Red-cockaded Woodpecker is the only woodpecker in North America that excavates cavities in living trees.

The Red-cockaded Woodpecker is found in the southeastern United States from Virginia to central Florida and west to eastern Texas. In Texas, the Red-cockaded Woodpecker is found in the Pineywoods and Post Oak Savannah ecoregions.

The Red-cockaded Woodpecker prefers to nest in mature pine forests. The bird excavates cavities in living trees, typically longleaf pines. A group of Red-cockaded Woodpeckers is called a “cluster”.

Clusters typically consist of a breeding pair of birds and one or more non-breeding “helpers”. Helpers are usually the offspring of the breeding pair from previous years.

Northern Flicker

Northern Flicker

The Northern Flickers are members of the woodpecker family. These birds are very distinctive with their red underwings and tail. The males have a black mustache mark on their face.

The Northern Flicker is the only North American woodpecker that feeds primarily on the ground. You can often see them digging for ants and other insects with their long tongues. Flickers are also known to eat berries and fruits.

The Northern Flicker is a social bird and often seen in pairs or small flocks. They are most active at dawn and dusk. During the day they perch on tree branches or power lines.

These birds mate for life and nesting season is usually from April-May. The female will lay anywhere from four to eight eggs in a nest made of wood chips and bark.

The Northern Flicker is one of the most widespread woodpeckers in Texas. They are found in forests, parks, and even backyards. If you see a woodpecker with a red breast and yellow underwings, you have probably spotted a Northern Flicker!

The best time to see a Northern Flicker is during the nesting season, which is from April to May. The female will lay anywhere from four to eight eggs in a nest made of wood chips and bark.

If you see a woodpecker with a red breast and yellow underwings, you have probably spotted a Northern Flicker! These birds are very distinctive and make a great addition to any birdwatching list.

Acorn Woodpecker

Acorn Woodpecker

The Acorn Woodpecker is a small bird with a black and white plumage. The male has a red head, while the female has a black head. Both sexes have a white belly and wings. The Acorn Woodpecker is about the size of a robin.

The Acorn Woodpecker feeds on insects, larvae, and acorns. It is a common bird in wooded areas of Texas. The Acorn Woodpecker often excavates holes in trees to store acorns.

The Acorn Woodpecker is a social bird and often forms flocks with other birds. It is an active bird that is often seen climbing trees in search of food. The Acorn Woodpecker is a vocal bird and often makes a loud, harsh call.

The Acorn Woodpecker is a small bird with black and white plumage. The male has a red head, while the female has a black head. Both sexes have white bellies and wings. The Acorn Woodpecker is about the size of a robin.

The Acorn Woodpecker feeds on insects, larvae, and acorns. It is a common bird in wooded areas of Texas and often excavates holes in trees to store acorns.

Red-naped Sapsucker

Red-naped Sapsucker

Red-naped Sapsuckers are small, woodpeckers with a black back, white belly, and rusty red cap. They have a white line running down their neck and a black stripe that extends from their bill, through their eye, to the back of their head. Males also have a red throat. These birds are found in woodlands, often near pines.

Red-naped Sapsuckers drill neat rows of holes in trees to reach the sap within. They also eat insects, berries, and tree nuts.

You might see these birds hovering in front of a tree trunk or hanging upside down from a branch as they feed. In springtime, listen for their loud, flute-like song.

The best place to look for Red-naped Sapsuckers is in woodlands near pines. These birds are often found in the same areas as other woodpeckers, such as Lewis’s Woodpeckers and Williamson’s Sapsuckers.

Red-naped Sapsuckers are most active during the day, so keep an eye out for them while you’re hiking or birdwatching.

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker

The red-bellied woodpecker is a small to medium-sized bird with black and white plumage. The male has a red cap while the female has a black cap. The belly of this bird is indeed reddish but can be hard to see unless the bird is in just the right light.

This species gets its name from the small patch of red feathers on the lower belly. The red-bellied are common woodpeckers in Texas and can be found in woods and forests across the state. This bird is known for its loud, high-pitched call which sounds like “kik- kik- kik.”

The red-bellied woodpecker is also known for its habit of drumming on trees and other hard surfaces. This behavior is used to attract mates and to establish territory.

The red-bellied woodpecker is an important bird in the ecosystem as it helps to control insect populations. This species is also a popular bird with birdwatchers and nature enthusiasts.

hairy woodpecker

Related post: Types of Woodpeckers in Nebraska

Hairy Woodpecker

The Hairy Woodpeckers are medium-sized woodpeckers found throughout North America. It is the largest woodpecker in its range, and has the longest bill of any North American woodpecker.

The adult Hairy Woodpecker is black with white stripes on its back and wings, and a white belly. It has a red patch on the back of its head, and a red crest.

The Hairy Woodpecker is an agile climber, and is often seen scaling tree trunks in search of food. Its diet consists mainly of insects, but it will also eat berries and nuts. The Hairy Woodpecker is a noisy bird, and its loud call can often be heard in forests.

The Hairy Woodpecker is a common bird, and is not considered to be at risk of extinction. However, like all woodpeckers, it is vulnerable to habitat loss and degradation. The Hairy Woodpecker is found in forests across North America, and its populations are thought to be stable.

Red-Breasted Sapsucker

Red-Breasted Sapsucker

The red-breasted sapsucker is a medium-sized woodpecker, measuring between 18 and 20 cm in length and weighing 50–60 g. The plumage is predominantly black, with white stripes on the face and wings.

The breast is red in males and yellow in females, while the belly is white. Juveniles have a brownish plumage with paler streaks.

The red-breasted sapsucker has a long tongue which it uses to extract sap from tree wounds. It also feeds on insects, berries, and fruits. The red-breasted sapsucker breeds in coniferous and mixed forests in North America.

The female lays between three and seven eggs in a nest hole which is excavated in a tree. Both parents feed the young birds.

The red-breasted sapsucker is classed as a least concern species by the IUCN. However, its numbers have declined in some parts of its range due to habitat loss and the use of pesticides.

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

The yellow-bellied sapsucker is a medium-sized woodpecker with a black and white striped back, black wings and tail, and a rusty breast. Males have a red throat and females have a white throat. These birds are found in woods, especially near streams or other sources of water.

Their diet consists mostly of sap from trees, but they will also eat insects. To get to the sap, they drill small holes in the tree bark and then lap up the sap with their long tongues.

In the spring, yellow-bellied sapsuckers mate and nest in trees. The female lays between three and seven eggs in a nest made of wood chips and bark. Both parents help to incubate the eggs and care for the young birds.

If you live in an area where yellow-bellied sapsuckers are found, you may be able to attract them to your yard by putting up a suet feeder. These birds are also attracted to fruit trees, so you may see them in your garden or yard if you have these types of trees.

Ivory-coloured Woodpecker

Ivory-coloured Woodpeckers

The ivory-coloured woodpecker is a small to medium-sized woodpecker that is found in the forests of Texas. These birds are mostly white with some black on their wings and tail. They have a black stripe that runs down their back and a black cap on their head. The male and female Ivory-coloured Woodpeckers look alike.

The Ivory-coloured Woodpecker is a shy bird and is not often seen. When they are seen, they are usually alone or in pairs. These birds are very active and can be seen climbing trees, flying from branch to branch, or pecking at tree trunks.

The Ivory-coloured Woodpecker eats insects and larvae that it finds in trees. It also eats fruits, nuts, and seeds.

The Ivory-coloured Woodpecker is a monogamous bird. The pair will mate for life and build their nest together. The female will lay between two and five eggs in the nest. Both parents will care for the young birds until they are old enough to leave the nest.

pileated woodpeckers

Pileated Woodpeckers

Pileated woodpeckers are among the largest woodpeckers in Texas, and they’re fairly common in Texas. If you’re lucky enough to spot one of these birds, you’ll be able to identify it by its distinctive appearance and behavior.

The pileated woodpecker is a large bird, with a body length of 16 to 21 inches. Its wingspan can reach up to 30 inches, and it weighs between 12 and 20 ounces. The bird is black with white stripes running down its back and sides. It has a red crest on its head, and its bill is long and straight.

Pileated woodpeckers are known for their loud, harsh calls. They also have a distinctive drumming behavior, in which they rapidly tap their beaks against tree trunks or branches. This behavior is used to communicate with other birds, as well as to find insects hidden beneath the bark.

Pileated woodpeckers are mostly found in forests, where they feed on insects, berries, and nuts. They nest in tree cavities, which they excavate themselves. These birds are not migratory, so you can usually spot them year-round in Texas.

Golden-fronted Woodpecker

Golden-fronted Woodpecker

The Golden-fronted Woodpecker is a beautiful bird that can be found in Texas. These woodpeckers are small to medium sized, and they have a black body with a golden-yellow head. The back of their neck and upper chest are also black, but their belly is white.

They have a long bill that is black, and their legs and feet are also black. Golden-fronted Woodpeckers can be found in woodlands, forests, and parks. They prefer to nest in trees that have dead wood because they use this wood to build their nests. These birds eat insects, fruits, and nuts.

You can often see them climbing trees or flying from branch to branch in search of food. If you’re lucky, you might even see them drilling holes into trees with their beaks! Golden-fronted Woodpeckers are interesting birds to watch, and they can make great pets.

If you’re thinking about getting a Golden-fronted Woodpecker as a pet, be sure to do your research first. These birds are not for everyone, but if you think you can provide them with the care they need, then they make wonderful pets.

williamson's sapsucker

Williamson’s Sapsucker

The Williamson’s Sapsucker is a medium sized woodpecker that is found in the western United States and Mexico. They are black, white, and yellow with a red throat patch.

The male has a white forehead while the female has a brown forehead. Williamson’s Sapsuckers are shy birds and are not often seen at bird feeders. They prefer to nesting in aspens, cottonwoods, and willows.

The Williamson’s Sapsucker drills small holes in trees to get at the sap. They also eat insects that are attracted to the sap.

You can often hear them drilling on trees during the day. In the spring, the male Williamson’s Sapsucker will often tap on tree trunks or branches to attract a mate.

Red-headed Woodpeckers

Red-headed Woodpecker

The Red-headed Woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker found in North America. It is the only member of its genus, Melanerpes. The adult male has a bright red head and neck, while the female has a brown head with some red on the nape.

Both sexes have white underparts with black bars on the sides, a black back with white spots, and a white rump. The adult male also has a red crest, while the female has a brown crest. Juveniles have a brown head and back with white spots.

The Red-headed Woodpecker is found in woodlands across much of North America east of the Rockies. It is a non-migratory bird and will often stay in the same area year-round.

The Red-headed Woodpecker prefers to nest in trees, but will occasionally nest in power poles or other man-made structures.

The diet of the Red-headed Woodpecker consists primarily of insects, although they will also eat fruits, nuts, and berries.

They are known to eat more than their body weight in insects each day. The Red-headed Woodpecker is an important bird for controlling insect populations.

Golden-fronted Woodpecker

Gold-fronted Woodpecker

The Gold-fronted Woodpecker is a small to medium-sized woodpecker with a black back and wings, white belly, and grayish head. The most distinguishing feature of this bird is the large gold patch on its forehead and face.

The adult male has a red cap, while the female’s is black. Both sexes have a white line running down the center of their back.

This woodpecker is found in open woodlands, where it feeds on insects and larvae. It also eats berries and nuts.

The Gold-fronted Woodpecker nests in cavities in trees, often excavating its own hole. Both parents help to raise the young.

This bird is a common sight in Texas, where it is year-round resident.

How to attract woodpeckers?

You can attract woodpeckers to your yard by putting up a birdhouse or feeder. Be sure to put the birdhouse in a location where there are trees nearby. Woodpeckers also like to nest in dead trees, so if you have any on your property, leave them be.

You can also attract woodpeckers by providing them with a source of food. Insects are their primary food source, so putting out a birdbath or feeding them live insects will usually bring them to your yard.

Fruit is also a favorite food of woodpeckers, so putting out a fruit feeder might also attract them. Be sure to check with your local wildlife department to find out what type of food is best to put out for woodpeckers in Texas.

What is the largest woodpecker in Texas?

The largest woodpeckers in Texas are the Golden-fronted woodpeckers. This bird is a small to medium-sized woodpecker with a black back and wings, white belly, and grayish head. The most distinguishing feature of this bird is the large gold patch on its forehead and face.

What woodpeckers live in North Texas?

The following woodpeckers are found in North Texas: the Williamson’s Sapsucker, Red-headed Woodpecker, Gold-fronted Woodpecker, and Golden-fronted Woodpecker. These birds are all common sights in Texas and can be attracted to your yard by putting out a birdhouse or feeder.

Are woodpeckers rare in Texas?

No, woodpeckers are not rare in Texas. In fact, there are several different species of woodpeckers that can be found in the state. The most common species are the Williamson’s Sapsucker, Red-headed Woodpecker, Gold-fronted Woodpecker, and Golden-fronted Woodpecker.