Lewis's Woodpecker

Types of Woodpeckers in Vermont (with Pictures)

We’ll go through the most frequent woodpecker species in Vermont, including photographs and important facts. Only reliable sources were used to collect the data, which was then verified with an ornithologist.

There are many different types of woodpeckers that can be found in Vermont. In this blog post, we will discuss the four most common types of woodpeckers in the state. These include the Downy Woodpecker, Hairy Woodpecker, Northern Flicker, and Pileated Woodpecker. We will provide a brief description of each bird, as well as some information on their preferred habitat and diet.

Most Common Woodpeckers in Vermont

Red-headed Woodpecker

Red-headed Woodpeckers

The Red-headed Woodpecker is a beautiful bird with a striking redhead. The male has a completely red head, while the female has a redhead with a white stripe down the middle. Both sexes have a white back and wings with black bars and a white belly. They are about the same size as a Robin – about nine inches long.

Red-headed Woodpeckers are the only woodpeckers in Vermont that have a complete redhead. They live in forests and wooded areas and can be seen climbing up trees to search for food. They eat insects, acorns, nuts, and fruit.

Red-headed Woodpeckers are declining in numbers due to habitat loss and the use of pesticides. You can help them by creating a bird-friendly habitat in your backyard!

Here are some tips:

  • Plant native trees and shrubs, which provide food and shelter for birds.
  • Avoid using pesticides, which can poison birds.
  • Provide a water source, such as a birdbath, for birds to drink and bathe in.

By following these simple tips, you can help the Red-headed Woodpecker and other birds thrive! Vermont is a great place to live if you love nature and want to help protect it.

Downy Woodpecker

Downy Woodpeckers

Downy Woodpecker Scientific name: Picoides pubescens

The Downy Woodpecker is the smallest woodpecker in North America. They have a black head and back, white cheeks and belly, and a red cap. They are about six inches long and weigh about an ounce. Downy Woodpeckers often forage on the ground or cling to tree trunks while pecking insects out of crevices. Their diet consists mostly of insects and spiders, but they will also eat berries and nuts. In the winter, when insects are scarce, Downy Woodpeckers will visit suet feeders.

Downy Woodpeckers are found in forests across North America. In Vermont, they are most common in the northern and western parts of the state. Downy Woodpeckers nest in tree cavities. Both males and females excavate the nest cavity, which is usually about eight inches deep and four inches wide. The female lays three to eight eggs, which she incubates for about two weeks. The young chicks stay in the nest for about two more weeks, until they are able to fly.

Downy Woodpeckers are very common birds and can be found in backyards and parks throughout North America. They are easy to identify because of their black and white plumage and their small size.

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

The Yellow-bellied Sapsucker is a small woodpecker that can be found in North America. These birds are known for their love of sap, which they get by drilling holes into trees. While most people think of them as pests, they actually play an important role in the ecosystem by helping to spread tree diseases.

Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers are also interesting to watch, as they can be very acrobatic. In Vermont, these birds can be found in the eastern and central parts of the state.

Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers are small woodpeckers that typically measure about nine inches in length. They have a black back and wings, with a white belly and throat. Males usually have a red patch on their heads, while females do not. These birds are found in wooded areas and make their homes in tree cavities.

While Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers mainly eat insects, they get the majority of their water from the sap. They drill holes into trees and drink the sap that oozes out. They can also be quite messy, as they often spread the sap around while feeding.

Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers play an important role in the forest ecosystem. By drilling holes into trees, they help to distribute tree diseases. This is because the sap that they feed on is full of bacteria and other microorganisms. When they drill holes into a tree, they introduce these microorganisms to the tree, which can help to spread diseases.

Hairy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker Scientific name: Picoides villosus

The Hairy Woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker that is found in North America. The bird gets its name from the long, stiff feathers on its back and head, which look like hairs. The Hairy Woodpecker has black and white plumage with a red patch on the back of its head. The bird is about 16 inches long with a wingspan of 24 inches.

The Hairy Woodpecker is a very good climber and can often be seen scaling trees in search of food. The bird feeds on insects, larvae, and other small creatures that it finds in the bark of trees. The Hairy Woodpecker is a very important part of the ecosystem and helps to control the population of insects.

Northern Flicker

Northern Flicker

Northern Flickers are medium-sized woodpeckers with a long, slightly curved bill. They have a black back and cap, white sides and belly, and rufous or chestnut wings and tails. Males have a red mustache stripe that extends from the bill to the forehead. Females lack the mustache stripe but have a small red patch on the nape of the neck. Both sexes have a white rump that is conspicuous in flight. Juveniles are similar to adults but duller and lack the mustache stripe or red nape patch.

Flickers are often seen feeding on the ground, where they eat ants and other insects. They also eat fruit, berries, and seeds. In Vermont, Flickers are most often seen in deciduous forests and woodlands, but they also occur in coniferous forests, orchards, parks, and residential areas.

Flickers nest in tree cavities. Both sexes excavate the cavity, which is usually about 15 feet off the ground. The female lays four to six eggs and incubates them for about two weeks. The young fledge in another two weeks.

Northern Flickers are common birds and can be found throughout most of the United States. In Vermont, they are one of the most common woodpeckers. They are a year-round resident in the state.

Related post: Types of Woodpeckers in Kansas

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker

The red-bellied woodpecker is a small to medium-sized woodpecker with black and white plumage. The belly is pale pink or salmon-colored, and the wings are barred with black and white.

This bird is found in deciduous forests of eastern North America, from southern Canada to northern Florida. It is a common bird, and its loud drumming can be heard in springtime. The red-bellied woodpecker is a cavity nester, and both sexes excavate nesting holes.

This bird feeds on insects, fruits, and nuts. It is also known to visit backyard bird feeders.

The red-bellied woodpecker is a small to medium-sized woodpecker with black and white plumage. The belly is pale pink or salmon-colored, and the wings are barred with black and white. This bird is found in deciduous forests of eastern North America, from southern Canada to northern Florida.

It is a common bird, and its loud drumming can be heard in springtime. The red-bellied woodpecker is a cavity nester, and both sexes excavate nesting holes.

This bird feeds on insects, fruits, and nuts. It is also known to visit backyard bird feeders. The red-bellied woodpecker is a fun bird to watch, and it is a great addition to any backyard birding list.

Black-backed Woodpecker

Black-backed Woodpeckers

The Black-backed Woodpecker is a small to medium-sized woodpecker with a black back, wings, and tail. The head is white with a black cap, and the underparts are white. The bill is chisel-shaped and slightly longer than the head. The Black-backed Woodpecker is found in forests across North America.

Black-backed Woodpeckers are solitary birds, and males and females have similar plumage. They forage on the ground, in trees or in dead logs, for insects and other small prey. Black-backed Woodpeckers make a drumming noise by quickly hitting their beaks against a tree trunk. This is used to attract mates and to establish territories.

The Black-backed Woodpecker is a cavity nester, and both sexes excavate nesting holes in trees. The female lays three to seven eggs, which are incubated for about two weeks. The young birds fledge at around four weeks of age. Black-backed Woodpeckers may live for up to twelve years in the wild.

The Black-backed Woodpecker is a shy bird, but it can be attracted to backyard feeders with suet or peanut butter. These birds are important members of forest ecosystems, and they help to control insect populations.

Lewis’s Woodpecker

Lewis's Woodpecker

The Lewis’s Woodpecker is a small woodpecker that measures about seven inches in length. It has a black back, white belly, and red cap. The bird can be identified by its two white stripes on the side of its head. Lewis’s Woodpeckers are common in open areas with large trees, such as parks, orchards, and farms.

These woodpeckers feed on insects that they find in trees or on the ground. They also eat fruit and seeds. Lewis’s Woodpeckers are cavity nesters and will often use old holes made by other birds, such as bluebirds or tree swallows. They will also excavate their own nesting cavities in dead trees.

Lewis’s Woodpeckers are quiet birds and are not often seen by people. However, they can be heard hammering on trees as they search for food. These woodpeckers are common in the eastern United States, from Maine to Texas. They are also found in parts of Canada and Mexico. Lewis’s Woodpeckers are year-round residents in most of their range and do not migrate.

American Three-Toed Woodpecker

American-Three-Toed Woodpecker

The American three-toed woodpecker is a small to medium-sized woodpecker that is native to North America. The adult has black upperparts, white underparts, and a white face with a black mask. The wings are black with white bars, and the tail is black with white outer feathers. The sexes are similar in appearance, but the juvenile has brown upper parts and a spotted white underbody.

The American three-toed woodpecker is found in forests across North America. It prefers open or mixed forest habitats with large trees for nesting and foraging. This woodpecker feeds on insects, spiders, fruit, and seeds. It typically forages on the trunk and branches of trees, but sometimes forages on the ground.

The American three-toed woodpecker is a shy bird that usually stays hidden in the trees. It typically moves slowly and deliberately when it does move around. This woodpecker is monogamous and pairs bond for life. The nest is a hole excavated in a tree by the male and lined with wood chips. The female lays three to seven eggs, and both parents help care for the young.

The American three-toed woodpecker is not considered to be at risk of extinction. However, its populations have declined in some areas due to habitat loss. This woodpecker is a common sight in many parts of its range and is an interesting bird to watch.

Pileated Woodpeckers

Pileated Woodpeckers

Pileated Woodpecker Scientific name: Dryocopus pileatus

Pileated Woodpeckers are the largest woodpecker in North America. They have a black body with a red crest on their head. They are also the only woodpecker that has a white mustache.

Pileated Woodpeckers live in forests near large trees. They eat insects and nuts. These woodpeckers in Vermont can be found from May to September.

During the winter, they migrate to the south. Pileated Woodpeckers are very noisy birds and can be heard from a long-distance away. They drum on trees to warn other birds of danger or to mark their territory.

Pileated Woodpeckers are shy birds and are not often seen by people. If you are lucky enough to see one, it will be a moment you will never forget.

Pileated Woodpeckers mate for life and usually have two to four chicks per year. The female woodpecker incubates the eggs for about two weeks. Both parents feed the chicks until they are old enough to fend for themselves.