williamson's sapsucker

Types of Woodpeckers in Washington State (with Pictures)

There are many different types of woodpeckers that can be found in Washington State. In this blog post, we will discuss the most common ones. The three most common woodpeckers in Washington are the Pileated Woodpecker, the Northern Flicker, and the American Three-toed Woodpecker. Each of these birds has its own unique characteristics and habits. We will go over each one in detail below!

Only reputable sources and an Ornithologist were used to verify the data.

Most Common Woodpecker Species of Washington State

American-Three-Toed Woodpecker

American Three-Toed Woodpecker

The American three-toed woodpecker is a small to medium sized woodpecker that is found in North America. The back and wings are black with white bars, the belly is white, and the head has a red cap. Males and females look alike. These birds are about 16 cm long with a wingspan of about 26 cm.

Woodpeckers are known for their loud drumming on trees. This is how they communicate with other woodpeckers and also attract mates. The American three-toed woodpecker drums at a rate of about 15 times per second.

These birds eat insects, spiders, and other small invertebrates. They will also eat fruit and nuts. The American three-toed woodpecker is an important bird for controlling insect populations.

The American three-toed woodpecker is not considered to be a threatened or endangered species. However, their numbers have declined in some areas due to habitat loss.

Pileated Woodpeckers

Pileated Woodpeckers

The Pileated Woodpecker is the largest woodpecker in North America, and one of the most striking birds in Washington State. They are black with a white belly and throat, and have a red crest on their head. Males also have a red mustache. These birds are very large, measuring 16-21 inches long with a wingspan of 26-30 inches.

Pileated Woodpeckers are very active birds, and are often seen climbing up trees or flying from one tree to another. They eat a variety of insects, as well as fruits and nuts. These birds nest in cavities in trees, and will sometimes excavate their own nests.

Hairy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpeckers

The Hairy Woodpecker is a black and white woodpecker that can be found in North America. It is one of the largest woodpeckers on the continent, and its name comes from the long feathers on its back. The Hairy Woodpecker is a very important bird to the forest ecosystem because it helps to control insect populations.

The Hairy Woodpecker is mostly black with some white on its wings and tail. The bird has a very long bill and a strong body. It is about 16 inches long and weighs about ounces.

The Hairy Woodpecker can be found in forests across North America. It is most commonly seen in the eastern United States, but it can also be found in the western states, including Washington.

The Hairy Woodpecker is an important bird to the forest ecosystem because it helps to control insect populations. The bird eats insects, including beetles, ants, and wasps.

By eating these insects, the Hairy Woodpecker helps to keep the population of these insects under control. This is important because these insects can damage trees and other plants in the forest.

White-headed Woodpecker

White-headed Woodpecker

The White-headed Woodpecker is a small to medium-sized woodpecker with a white head and black back. They are found in forests of the western United States and Canada.

The White-headed Woodpecker is the only woodpecker in North America with a completely white head. Both sexes have a black back, wings, and tail, with white spotting on the wings. They have a black bill and legs. Juveniles have a brown head and back.

The White-headed Woodpecker is a shy bird and is not often seen in open areas. They are more likely to be found in forests where they can find dead trees to nest in and forage for food.

These woodpeckers eat insects, berries, and nuts. They use their long tongues to reach into crevices to find food.

The White-headed Woodpecker is declining in population due to habitat loss and fragmentation. Protecting forests is important for the survival of this species.

You can help the White-headed Woodpecker by:

  • -Protecting forests and woodlands
  • -Creating nest boxes for these birds
  • -Providing perches and nesting sites in your yard or garden
Northern Flicker

Northern Flicker

The Northern Flicker is a member of the woodpecker family. They are medium-sized birds with brownish-red plumage on their backs and wings. The underside of their wings and tails are yellow.

Male Northern Flickers have a black ” mustache” mark on their face, while females have a red mark. Both sexes have a red mark on their breast. Northern Flickers are found in wooded areas across North America. In Washington State, they are most common in the eastern part of the state.

Northern Flickers are active during the day and spend much of their time foraging for food on the ground. Their diet consists mainly of insects, but they will also eat berries and nuts.

Northern Flickers will often perch on a branch and watch for prey before swooping down to catch it. They use their long tongues to extract insects from crevices in trees.

During the breeding season, male Northern Flickers will drum their beaks against a tree trunk or other hard surface to attract a mate. Once they have found a mate, they will excavate a nest cavity in a tree.

The female will lay between four and eight eggs in the nest. Both parents help to incubate the eggs and care for the young birds.

Red-Breasted Sapsucker

Related post: Types of Woodpeckers in Texas

Red-Breasted Sapsucker

The red-breasted sapsucker (Sphyrapicus ruber) is a medium-sized woodpecker found in North America. It is the only member of the genus Sphyrapicus.

The red-breasted sapsucker is a fairly small woodpecker, measuring between 18 and 21 cm (between seven and eight inches) in length and weighing between 40 and 50 grams (between one and two ounces).

The red-breasted sapsucker has a black back and wings, with a white breast and belly. The male red-breasted sapsucker has a red throat and forehead, while the female has a yellow throat and forehead.

The red-breasted sapsucker is found in coniferous and mixed forests across North America. It is a migratory bird, wintering in the southern United States and Mexico. The red-breasted sapsucker nests in tree cavities, often excavating its own cavity.

The red-breasted sapsucker is an opportunistic feeder, eating insects, berries, and tree sap. The red-breasted sapsucker is known to tap trees for sap, using its long tongue to lap up the sweet liquid.

The red-breasted sapsucker is a fairly common bird, with a population of around one million individuals. The red-breasted sapsucker is not currently considered to be at risk of extinction.

However, the red-breasted sapsucker faces a number of threats, including habitat loss and degradation, as well as competition from other species of birds.

Downy Woodpeckers

Downy Woodpecker

The Downy Woodpecker is the smallest woodpecker in North America. It has a black body with white stripes on its back and wings. The male has a red patch on the back of its head, while the female does not.

Downy Woodpeckers are found in forests and woods across North America. They nest in tree cavities and eat insects, spiders, and berries.

Downy Woodpeckers are active during the day and are often seen climbing up trees in search of food. They also like to feed on suet at bird feeders.

When they are not feeding or nesting, Downy Woodpeckers can often be seen sitting on tree branches or flying from one tree to another. These little birds are a joy to watch and listen to!

Red-naped Sapsucker

Red-naped Sapsucker

The Red-naped Sapsucker is a medium-sized woodpecker that is found in North America. The adult male has a red nape (back of the neck) and crown, while the female has a brown nape and crown.

Both sexes have white cheek patches, black wings with white bars, and a yellow breast with black streaks. The Red-naped Sapsucker is the only North American woodpecker that has a red nape.

The Red-naped Sapsucker breeds in coniferous forests in western North America from Alaska to northern Mexico. It winters in the southern United States and Mexico.

This bird is a permanent resident in most of its breeding range, but northern birds may migrate south in winter.

The Red-naped Sapsucker excavates shallow holes in tree bark to reach the sap beneath. It also drills deeper holes to reach insects that are attracted to the sap.

This bird often returns to the same tree day after day, making a neat row of holes. The sap from these holes drips down the tree and is eaten by insects, which the sapsucker then captures.

The Red-naped Sapsucker often feeds on ants, beetles, flies, moths, wasps, and other insects. It also eats berries and fruit.

williamson's sapsucker

Williamson’s Sapsucker

The Williamson’s Sapsucker is a medium-sized woodpecker that is found in the western United States and Canada. This bird gets its name from the fact that it drills holes in trees and drinks the sap.

The Williamson’s Sapsucker is black, white, and yellow with a red throat. These birds are about 15 inches long.

The Williamson’s Sapsucker is a shy bird that is not often seen. When they are seen, they are usually in pairs or alone. These birds are most active at dawn and dusk.

They nest in trees and make a loud drumming noise when they are searching for food. The Williamson’s Sapsucker eats insects, berries, and sap.

If you see a Williamson’s Sapsucker, be sure to take a picture! These birds are not often seen and it is a treat to catch a glimpse of one.

Lewis's Woodpecker

Lewis’s Woodpecker

The Lewis’s Woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker with black and white plumage. The back is black with white spots, the underparts are white, and there is a red cap on the head.

This bird is found in open woodlands in the western United States. It feeds on insects, berries, and nuts. The Lewis’s Woodpecker is named after Meriwether Lewis, who was the first to describe this bird.

The Lewis’s Woodpecker is a shy bird but can be seen in small flocks during the winter. This woodpecker is not often seen at feeders but may visit if there are suet or nuts available.

This bird nests in cavities in trees and often uses old abandoned nests of other birds. The Lewis’s Woodpecker is declining in numbers due to habitat loss and fragmentation.

When looking for the Lewis’s Woodpecker, keep an eye out for its distinctive red head. This woodpecker is most active during the day, so you’re likely to see it during the day as it forages for food. Look for this woodpecker in woodlands in the western United States.

How to attract woodpeckers?

Woodpeckers are attracted to suet, nuts, and berries. You can also put out a birdbath or small pond for them to drink from and take a dip in. Woodpeckers also like trees with rough bark that they can use for pecking. If you have a wooded area on your property, that is the best place to attract woodpeckers.

You can also put up a birdhouse for them to nest in. Be sure to put the birdhouse high up off the ground and away from any trees or shrubs. Woodpeckers are shy birds, so it may take some time before they start using your birdhouse. Once they find it, though, they will likely use it year after year.

Are woodpeckers protected in WA?

Yes, woodpeckers are protected in Washington state. It is illegal to kill or capture them without a permit. If you find an injured woodpecker, you can take it to a wildlife rehabilitation center for care.

Does Washington have woodpeckers?

Yes! There are three species of woodpeckers that call Washington state home: the Red-naped Sapsucker, the Williamson’s Sapsucker, and the Lewis’s Woodpecker.

What do woodpeckers look like in Washington state?

Each of these woodpeckers has unique plumage. The Red-naped Sapsucker is black, white, and yellow with a red throat. The Williamson’s Sapsucker is black, white, and yellow with a red throat. The Lewis’s Woodpecker is black and white with a red head.

What type of woodpeckers are in Washington state?

There are three species of woodpeckers that call Washington state home: the Red-naped Sapsucker, the Williamson’s Sapsucker, and the Lewis’s Woodpecker.